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BANGKOK 16 October 2018 17:50
Boy Wonder

Moving to Thailand, working online - what do I do?

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I'm a Software Engineer in the USA, working full-time. I want to move to Thailand for 6+ months. My plan is to continue working my job remotely.

 

What are the steps I should take here? Should I just go to Thai embassy and apply for 60 day visa and just keep renewing as long as I want to stay? Do I need a work permit to do my online remote work?

 

Any help appreciated. Thanks!

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Good advise fom the above. Only thing to add is that, IF using the Tourist VISA excempt flying in and out of Thailand, just do that,, but use the airport no landborders...

 

This Tourist VISA excempt can also be extended for another 30 days, so you have 60 days for each trip out of Thailand...

 

glegolo

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Working in Thailand as a digital nomad without a work permit is not strictly legal, but is tolerated by the authorities. As a practical matter, there is no way to get a work permit. As long as your employer is not Thai, and you do not have Thai clients, the authorities will leave you alone even if they become aware of it. For a six month stay, just use tourist visas.

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7 hours ago, Boy Wonder said:

What are the steps I should take here

make sure you have a good internet connection

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1 hour ago, BritTim said:

Working in Thailand as a digital nomad without a work permit is not strictly legal, but is tolerated by the authorities. As a practical matter, there is no way to get a work permit. As long as your employer is not Thai, and you do not have Thai clients, the authorities will leave you alone even if they become aware of it. For a six month stay, just use tourist visas.

 

I'd be careful differentiating between "tolerated by the authorities" and "the authorities don't have the tools (or the marching orders) today to crack down". 

 

It may seem like nit picking, but it's a lot like a few years back when people lived in Thailand for decades on monthly visa runs.  Had they known that a switch could flip one day and throw their lives into turmoil, they may have done things differently.  They may have either expended the time, money and effort to get legal right out of the blocks, or not invested as much as they did in their Thai life, including, in many cases, starting families they were forced to leave behind. 

 

I know a lot of guys who wish they had invested in getting legal rather than buying that new car, the condo, or the house for their GF.  By the time things changed, they no longer had the wherewithal.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, impulse said:

I'd be careful differentiating between "tolerated by the authorities" and "the authorities don't have the tools (or the marching orders) today to crack down". 

I understand your point, but there is plenty of evidence that the authorities really do have a policy of tolerating digital nomads.

 

There was a single case a few years ago where a co-working space in Chiang Mai was raided. As I recall, about a dozen digital nomads were present. No one was charged, and it is now widely recognized that the raid was a mistake. There have been no subsequent raids at any of the hundreds of co-working spaces all around Thailand catering to digital nomads. If the authorities wanted to crack down, it would be simple.

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3 hours ago, impulse said:

 

I'd be careful differentiating between "tolerated by the authorities" and "the authorities don't have the tools (or the marching orders) today to crack down". 

 

It may seem like nit picking, but it's a lot like a few years back when people lived in Thailand for decades on monthly visa runs.  Had they known that a switch could flip one day and throw their lives into turmoil, they may have done things differently.  They may have either expended the time, money and effort to get legal right out of the blocks, or not invested as much as they did in their Thai life, including, in many cases, starting families they were forced to leave behind. 

 

I know a lot of guys who wish they had invested in getting legal rather than buying that new car, the condo, or the house for their GF.  By the time things changed, they no longer had the wherewithal.

 

 

 

To the OP,  this subject is still open to interpretation regarding the Thai law.

 

Many posts on this subject (including this thread) are opinions rather than finite clear unambiguous interpretation of the laws by appropriate government agencies.

 

Some contributors in the various threads on this subject (and there have been many) claim they have been told by various government officers that it's all OK and no work permit (WP) is needed. However requests for proof, links etc., have never been supplied. It's not only WP laws, there are tax implications also.

 

On the other hand if your working in your own apartment or hotel who will see you? 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Boy Wonder said:

Thank you VERY much. This is exactly the sort of information I was looking for. I was completely unaware that working remote was unorthodox, and I tend to overshare at times... definitely avoided some potential issues by reading this. I will go in with a tourist visa and renew it every 3 months (I can't be bothered flying every month to renew the monthly visa upon arrival), and I'll be sure to keep my head down about how I make my money.

 

Again, thanks a bunch.

after 2 months go to immigration, get a 1 month extension 1,900

thna after 3 months you need leave the country and get anew visa, head to Laos, Cambodia or Myanmar

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Posted (edited)

Amazed no one is advising the legal route.. 

 

Contact iglu.in.th and have them provide you a work permit and B visa.. Its the real law. 

 

Yes you pay income tax (but you can then deduct it from your home country contributions) and social costs (you get medical benefit). No visa runs, red caret treatment, and fully legit. 

Edited by LivinLOS

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, BritTim said:

<snip>

If the authorities wanted to crack down, it would be simple.<snip2>

If the authorities at some point crack down, they will likely crack down on visas, not a raid on persons sitting in a shared work space. But that will likely involve persons on visas for much longer term than the OP.

 

But if you are in a shared work space, I would keep another browser window open so you could quickly switch over and say that you are just writing a letter to your mother.

Edited by JLCrab

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1 hour ago, LivinLOS said:

Amazed no one is advising the legal route.. 

 

Contact iglu.in.th and have them provide you a work permit and B visa.. Its the real law. 

 

Yes you pay income tax (but you can then deduct it from your home country contributions) and social costs (you get medical benefit). No visa runs, red caret treatment, and fully legit. 

 

Are you sure that's legal?   Or is it another one of many dodges like ED visas for people who never bother with going to classes?   They worked like a charm for decades, until one day they didn't.

 

I'm not claiming they're not 100% legit.  I don't know.  That's why I'm asking.   But I do know that a lot of services held out over the years as "perfectly legal" (monthly visa runs, proxy shareholders, companies set up just to own real estate, ED visas for the perpetually truant, and on and on...) were really operating in the gray (that's being generous, BTW) and many of those loopholes have since slammed shut.   For example, what is the description of the work, and the locations specified on the WP?  (Anyone remember the legally permitted dive instructors who got banged up for helping their students carry their gear- because the location and activity wasn't spelled out on their WP's)?

 

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1 hour ago, LivinLOS said:

Amazed no one is advising the legal route.. 

 

Contact iglu.in.th and have them provide you a work permit and B visa.. Its the real law. 

 

Yes you pay income tax (but you can then deduct it from your home country contributions) and social costs (you get medical benefit). No visa runs, red caret treatment, and fully legit. 

And very expensive

 

If the OP is here for 6 months it really is not worth it, as others have said if he works at home who is going to know?

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