Jump to content
BANGKOK 17 November 2018 13:33
webfact

Chakthip seeking Interpol assistance for ex-monk’s custody

Recommended Posts

Chakthip seeking Interpol assistance for ex-monk’s custody

By THE NATION

 

4018f2af84f827d73f4861dd9af4c850.jpeg

 

THAI ATTEMPTS to secure custody from Germany of Phra Phrommedhi, the fugitive former assistant abbot of Wat Samphanthawongsaram who is wanted for allegedly laundering millions of embezzled state funds, should be known on Friday, a source at the police head office said.

 

National police chief Pol General Chakthip Chaijinda flew to France with his team on Sunday night in what is reported to be an effort to seek help from the Interpol head office to secure the extradition of the fugitive monk, now known by his lay name Phra Chamnong Iam-intra. 

 

Chakthip’s previous trip to Frankfurt to take custody of the monk was a failure as Germany turned down the request and questioned “undemocratic” Thailand’s credibility, the source said. If coordination with Interpol were fruitful, Chakthip’s team would travel to Frankfurt to pick up the fugitive and return to Thailand on June 16 as previously scheduled, the source said. 

 

Meanwhile, the ongoing investigation has found more evidence of corruption. Bangkok’s Wat Sa Ket allegedly received Bt62.5 million from the National Office of Buddhism (NOB) on two occasions – Bt30 million on December 21, 2015 for dhamma training for children and youth; and Bt32.5 million on January 7, 2016 to propagate Buddhism – a police source said.

 

Under these projects, the temple said it would allocate money to 13 temple branches but the police probe initially found nine branch temples did not get any money while four temples got only Bt2 million each, the source said. The rest was wired to others’ bank accounts and allegedly spent on wrong purposes, the source said. 

 

Wat Sa Ket’s former abbot Phra Phromsitti (Thongchai Sukhayano) and assistants have been in custody over accusations of embezzling NOB budgets and money laundering.

 

Meanwhile, the president of the Network of Lawyers and People for Protection of Buddhism, Vorakorn Pongthanakul, led members to visit the five former senior monks at the Bangkok Remand Prison. 

 

Vorakorn told reporters that the five ex-monks – the former abbot of Wat Sam Phraya, the former secretary of Bangkok chief monk, and three former abbot assistants of Wat Sa Ket – had turned down his group’s offer of legal assistance as the ex-monks already had their own lawyers.

 

Meanwhile, Department of Special Investigation chief Pol Colonel Paisit Wongmuang said the disciplinary committee probing senior investigator Pisitchai Sawangwattanakorn over his Facebook posts that raids and arrests would be made at four Bangkok temples should conclude their investigation in 30 days. Paisit said that Pisitchai had admitted that he had based the information for the posts about police’s ongoing investigation on news reports from media and his own imagination.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30347781

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-06-15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I’m sure Interpol will break a few rules to p*** off the international community by helping return a corrupt monk to a corrupt and unelected government. What do they have to lose? 

 

Thailand, look up the word ‘sovereign nation’.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
an effort to seek help from the Interpol head office to secure the extradition of the fugitive monk
Matthew 7:7–8
"Ask, and it will be given you. Seek, and you will
find. Knock, and it will be opened for you.
For everyone who asks receives. He who seeks
finds. To him who knocks it will be opened.
Just doesn't seem to be working must be seeking help from the wrong people !
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Darcula said:

 

Bwahhahahahahaha. Ban on sauerkraut imports coming soon.

 

 

And the Thai Bratwurst will soon have three ends. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Chakthip’s previous trip to Frankfurt to take custody of the monk was a failure as Germany turned down the request and questioned “undemocratic” Thailand’s credibility, the source said. If coordination with Interpol were fruitful, Chakthip’s team would travel to Frankfurt to pick up the fugitive and return to Thailand on June 16 as previously scheduled, the source said.

Interpol = International Thai Police? Could German cops just show up in Thailand, arrest somebody and that without a work permit? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, YetAnother said:

how does that follow ? Interpol is not Germany; if Germany decides to keep the criminal , they can;

might be explained by the nitwit thinking of the thai police; trying , by means-not-likely-to-be-fruitful, to impose thai law abroad

Oh, and the German and French justice systems are fantastic and both countries are prime examples of shining democracy?

In the EU they are, and that filthy body is highly undemocratic.

And more or less doing the bidding of France and Germany.

Sometimes I can't escape the feeling there is more democracy in Thailand as in the bloody EU.

Edited by hansnl
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am puzzled by this report.My understanding was that Interpol is essentially a co-ordinating agency acting in the interests of member countries to counter cross border crime and circulate information on accused criminals who had left their home jurisdiction.It has no significant independent powers.In this case a member country, Germany , has a Thai national in custody (or under close observation) so there is no issue of Chaktip's whereabouts.How then can Interpol help the Thais in the matter of extradition? If some explanation of the rules was needed for a small underdeveloped country was needed, I can see how Interpol might play a role.But we are talking about Germany here, a highly developed sophisticated country with very clear ideas about democracy and human rights.Surely the Thais dialogue should be directly with Germany.The latter will have its own procedures and if eventually it decides to extradite the whole process will need to be completed.They will abide to their own timetable and will not be dictated to by the Thais.

 

Am I missing something? I don't condemn the Thai authorities as on the face of it Chakthip has a case to answer.My puzzlement may be of course be because of The Nation's slovenly reporting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be interesting to know if some of the money paid to the Wat by the NOB ended up back in the hands of those in the NOB..... If i was a betting man, i know which way i would bet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×