Jump to content
webfact

Why Thailand needs the death penalty

Recommended Posts

Why Thailand needs the death penalty

By The Nation

 

images.jpg

 

The majory supports capital punishment, though there is a middle way short of abolition
 

Amnesty International has come under fire for deploring the execution on Monday of a convicted criminal who stabbed to death a teenager while stealing his phone and wallet. The victim was found with 24 knife wounds. The violent crime was committed in Trang province in July 2012 by a man with a history of arrests who turned 26 this year.

 

Amnesty’s Facebook page on Tuesday was inundated with comments criticising its attack on Thailand’s first execution since August 2009. Amnesty International Thailand’s claim that there is no evidence the death penalty has any deterrent effect was challenged by angry Thai netizens who support retaining capital punishment and rebuked the group for protecting “evil criminals”.

 

A live online broadcast of an Amnesty International Thailand press conference on Tuesday outside Bang Kwang Central Prison, where the execution by lethal injection was carried out, drew many angry comments from viewers criticising the group’s stance against Thailand’s latest punishment by death.

 

Some asked if the anti-execution campaigners sincerely believed that someone who cruelly killed one of their own family members did not deserve to be punished by death. The Facebook Live broadcast was full of “angry” emoticons posted by viewers.

 

Meanwhile, in an online opinion survey, 96 per cent of the 78,000 respondents showed support for the execution of convicted murderers. Judging from that reaction, we may conclude that a large segment of Thai society agrees with executing convicted perpetrators of violent crimes.

 

To change those minds, Amnesty International and other such groups will need to produce convincing evidence that a more humane penalty – such as lengthy or life imprisonment – is an effective method for turning people convicted of violent crimes and repeat criminal offenders into law-binding citizens.

 

It’s wise to show leniency to first-time criminals and those who commit criminal offences out of rage or perceived necessity. But when it comes to repeat offenders and seasoned criminals, can we really see the possibility of reform?

 

Capital punishment has been rare in Thailand in the 15 years since the country adopted a “more humane” method of execution, by lethal injection, in December 2003. The execution on Monday was the seventh since then. Many citizens blame a lack of harsh punishment for a seeming rise in violent crime in recent years, such as rape-murders and killings that involve dismemberment and other gruesome acts.

 

We should opt for a middle path between the two extremes, between the abandonment of capital punishment as advocated by Amnesty International and applying the death penalty for anyone convicted of a killing. 

 

The death penalty should be reserved for premeditated murder. The Thai justice system seems to follow this middle path. There are more than 500 prisoners currently on death row, and only one person has been executed.

 

Yes, we should consider the rights of the convicted criminals regardless of their sins. But we also should not ignore the feelings and rights of their victims’ aggrieved families. The authorities have to ensure justice for all parties involved in criminal cases and make sure no innocent people are punished for crimes they did not commit.

 

Anyone can have a rosy view of humanity from time to time – believing that perpetrators of violent crimes and repeat offenders can be reformed someday. But they also should accept the fact that not all of those criminals can be reformed, no matter how much effort goes into it.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/opinion/30348252

 

thenation_logo.jpg

-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-06-21
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, webfact said:

It’s wise to show leniency to first-time criminals and those who commit criminal offences out of rage or perceived necessity. But when it comes to repeat offenders and seasoned criminals, can we really see the possibility of reform?

 

NO

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think of this execution as a signal of what could happen if you break the law. A big change is coming, and some lawbreakers better be careful.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, webfact said:

there is no evidence the death penalty has any deterrent effect

I dont think this statement tells the story. It's not about deterring other offenders, it's about dealing with the one you are holding.

1 hour ago, webfact said:

they also should accept the fact that not all of those criminals can be reformed

Which is perhaps the main part of the story. Should a person who shows no sign of reforming their ways be kept in prison for 50 years at the taxpayer's expense? Its a dilemma with no obvious easy answer. 

I dont like the idea that a govt has the right to put someone to death, especially in a system so open to abuse as the Thai one. But I still dont know what we should do with an obviously dangerous psychopath. Add religion into the mix and the argument will go on for a long time!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Death penalty should be kept and used when heinous crimes are committed and beyond any sliver of doubt, 

Absolute conclusive, non tampered with evidence, there would be more reasons not to carry out the sentence because of so many doubts, but where you have in some cases admission, and barbaric crimes committed against fellow humans, then  society should have the right to remove the right to live,

some people are just evil, mitigation of drugs , alcohol, love, lack of defence monies or inept defence the list is very long, on grounds to keep these people incarcerated for very long periods or life, 

and there are some  (not many) who fall in to  that level of evilness that warrant removal, 

yesterday this same argument was raised and if you remember just recently the fellow who cut up his business partner, he should forfeit his life, no question, so some do fall over that compassion line and as a society we need to have lines if you like, or parameters of the law and acceptance of going out side of that parameter, there are consequences that society will come down hard on. 

I agree with most a very touchy and complex subject any doubt at all then no death penalty

but the fellow  mentioned above, that was calculated, premeditated and hidden to deceive, and used the proceeds to enhance his life, 

so what justice does this  victim have,  he can not speak from the grave, and if he could, I think we all know what his request of sentence would be to the judge presiding over sentencing, so does the victim have a voice,  no its lost in arguments of law, and badgered compassion.

 

Some how we have started to lose sense of right and issues are starting to get pulled and stretched and muddled, you have no right to kill period,

but mitigating situations and circumstances do happen in this complex life.

When it is a case as above then no question you should be removed from society and lessen the burden.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree with Nev above.  The death penalty might deter the corrupt officials who rob the needy.   One a month for a couple of years might do it though Thais are slow learners and greed is genetically ingrained.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, nev said:

Maybe if the death penalty was brought in for corrupt politicians, police and the high so who blatantly break the rules to enhance their weath and not just for the poor, Then I can agree.

China has used this policy to eradicate the corrupt why not Thailand, Oh I know why those that make the decisions would not want their mates ending up on death row would they.

That would be quite some row though😁

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 18 July 2018 03:56
Sponsors
×