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BANGKOK 13 November 2018 08:10

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"When people come in we must immediately bring them back from where they came,"

I'm curious, is that proper grammar?

 

Sent from my BLL-L22 using Tapatalk

 

 

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I don't think so. But I'll admit I don't know all the rules.

 

I would suggest,

 

"When people come in we must immediately send them back from where they came from."

 

or

 

"When people come in we must immediately send them back from whence they came,."

 

I'd welcome being corrected and/or informed of the actual grammar" rules"  involved.

 

 

 

 

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1.  "Take" or "bring".  I have just reviewed this to prepare a lesson this past weekend. The choice depends on where the listener is situated, relative to the speaker. Sometimes, the object is a third person, such as a small child who can not transport himself, or an adult who does not know the route or doesn't have his own transportation. 

2. "Send"-  the object is to be delivered by a third party: (Send it by mail.) If the object is a person, that person is capable of transporting himself; e.g. "Send him downstairs"

3.  There is nothing wrong with saying "from where they came", though at least in North America, beginning with the preposition ("from", in this example) is usually considered stiff or formal.  Especially in spoken English, we usually say "where they came from"

4. In North America at least, "whence" is archaic. Everyone uses "where", whether speaking or writing.

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