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BANGKOK 20 November 2018 18:14
Will27

All Aussie Related Stuff (excluding the old age pension)

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I think that renewing the card for a further five years and assuming you will automatically remain eligible is incorrect.   Medicare can be cancelled at any time (and so can the card) if they data-match with Immigration records and determine you are a non-resident.   

 

If you don’t log into your MyGov account, or receive a hard copy letter (for whatever reason) you will be none the wiser. Until you try to use your card in the future.  

 

My best friend (non res) has just been through the drama of re-enrolling her eldest kid who is starting uni in Australia next year. 

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Telstra TV box.

Not sure this is the right place for this post but will ask anyway, has anyone taken a Telstra TV box to Thailand and been able to use it? Essentially it is a Telstra branded ROKU box.

Cheers

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9 hours ago, Richard70au said:

Telstra TV box.

Not sure this is the right place for this post but will ask anyway, has anyone taken a Telstra TV box to Thailand and been able to use it? Essentially it is a Telstra branded ROKU box.

Cheers

Hey hey, I have no idea, but while you're asking, has anyone taken the Optus version - 'Fetch' DVR - to Thailand and does it work? 

 

I bought my Fetch outright to replace the TiVo that has been allowed to die out in Australia.  The Fetch is brilliant for watching the Netflix and Stan streaming services with, saves all that stuffing around with Chromecast and similar.   

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20 hours ago, Richard70au said:

Telstra TV box.

Not sure this is the right place for this post but will ask anyway, has anyone taken a Telstra TV box to Thailand and been able to use it? Essentially it is a Telstra branded ROKU box.

Cheers

Do you mean permanently, or just while on holiday ? Either way, don't they only work through Telstra broadband ? I know you need a Telstra broadband account to get one. Guess the way to find out would be to try it on a friend's Optus or other connection ?

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Has anyone else noticed the presence of plain clothes officials at BKK Qantas flights departure gates?(they stand immediately next to the final boarding pass/passport computer)

I’ve often wondered who they are and what they’re doing. This may explain...




This article is from the November 11 issue of The Daily Telegraph Digital Edition.

RECORD NUMBER OF CRIMINALS STOPPED FROM FLYING TO AUSTRALIA


THE number of criminals, illegal immigrants and suspected terrorists kicked off flights bound for Australia has skyrocketed by 300 per cent.

A whopping 555 individuals were booted off flights in 2017-18 , up from the 136 people “offloaded” from planes to Australia the year before.

Some of the passengers taken off flights because they posed a “risk to the border” included individuals trying to enter the country illegally to work or live, as well as suspected criminals and others who were a national security concern, The Sunday Telegraph understands.

In most cases, Australian Border Force officials have worked with airlines such as Qantas and Emirates to keep these undesirables out.

Hundreds of other passengers with fraudulent documents have also been stopped before they could board flights. It’s estimated taxpayers would have been forced to fork out $15 million for authorities to detain and eventually deport the 205 people with fraudulent documents if they hadn’t been stopped from entering Australia.

Another 4584 travellers were stopped at airports and refused entry when they reached Australia in 2017-18 .

The ABF attributes the massive increase in the number of passengers booted off flights to Airline Liaison Officers working more closely with airlines, resulting in more awareness among airline staff of potential threats. Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton said ALOs were “crucial” to protecting Australia’s borders.

ABF Strategic Border Command Assistant Commissioner Erin Dale agreed ALOs played a critical role in keeping “unscrupulous individuals” out of Australia.

ALOs are stationed in 19 airports.


Copyright 2018 News Pty Limited

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10 hours ago, Nemises said:

Has anyone else noticed the presence of plain clothes officials at BKK Qantas flights departure gates?(they stand immediately next to the final boarding pass/passport computer)

I’ve often wondered who they are and what they’re doing. This may explain...




This article is from the November 11 issue of The Daily Telegraph Digital Edition.

RECORD NUMBER OF CRIMINALS STOPPED FROM FLYING TO AUSTRALIA


THE number of criminals, illegal immigrants and suspected terrorists kicked off flights bound for Australia has skyrocketed by 300 per cent.

A whopping 555 individuals were booted off flights in 2017-18 , up from the 136 people “offloaded” from planes to Australia the year before.

Some of the passengers taken off flights because they posed a “risk to the border” included individuals trying to enter the country illegally to work or live, as well as suspected criminals and others who were a national security concern, The Sunday Telegraph understands.

In most cases, Australian Border Force officials have worked with airlines such as Qantas and Emirates to keep these undesirables out.

Hundreds of other passengers with fraudulent documents have also been stopped before they could board flights. It’s estimated taxpayers would have been forced to fork out $15 million for authorities to detain and eventually deport the 205 people with fraudulent documents if they hadn’t been stopped from entering Australia.

Another 4584 travellers were stopped at airports and refused entry when they reached Australia in 2017-18 .

The ABF attributes the massive increase in the number of passengers booted off flights to Airline Liaison Officers working more closely with airlines, resulting in more awareness among airline staff of potential threats. Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton said ALOs were “crucial” to protecting Australia’s borders.

ABF Strategic Border Command Assistant Commissioner Erin Dale agreed ALOs played a critical role in keeping “unscrupulous individuals” out of Australia.

ALOs are stationed in 19 airports.


Copyright emoji767.png 2018 News Pty Limited

But lets just import some people from Africa & get some cultural enrichment. 

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This didn't come as a big surprise.

 

In their own words: Centrelink staff reveal contractor woes

 

Outsourced call centre workers are telling Centrelink customers incorrect information, transferring calls unnecessarily and making errors, according to a union survey of Human Services workers.

As more privatised call centres for Centrelink open around the country, the Community and Public Sector Union has published a report on the effects of privatisation at the agency, including results of a survey of nearly 1300 workers at the Department of Human Services.

The government has funded 2750 call centre jobs through private companies since 2017, as well as other contractors working in the compliance area.

Last month Human Services Minister Michael Keenan said a report from KPMG showed contractors performed as well as or better than full-time public servants on many measures. But the report itself, and any other findings have been kept under wraps.

Human Services secretary Renée Leon told Senate estimates last month that the use of labour hire was necessary to keep up service standards due to the average staffing level cap.

The union opposes the use of contractors in the call centres and has opposed the staffing level cap.

 

According to the survey, 85 per cent of respondents say private call providers are having a negative impact on service standards. They report the private call centre staff don't have the training they need, and clients are waiting longer to have their issues resolved because their issues can't always be fixed by the private contractors.

The report also found 85 per cent of Human Services staff surveyed said they had to fix issues that had been caused by the calls to private call centre staff.

The survey allowed staff to describe the effects of the private call centre workers, with staff detailing how their work was effected, including customers being aggressive or annoyed when they eventually spoke to a public servant.

"Customers often want more detailed information and these call centres cannot provide it so the customers are put through to normal DHS call centre staff and have to wait a long time anyway for their enquiries to be satisfactorily completed," one respondent said.

"Often, they are even more annoyed once they get through for having to wait twice and speaking to two different people to get their answers which does not make our organisation look very good at all. The only difference is that it is making the numbers of unanswered calls and timeliness figures look a lot better, which isn't the real story at all."

Staff also describe customers being given incorrect information that leads to missed payments, or increased contact with the agency.

"They often advise customers that they will be able to access something – eg advance/urgent payment etc and handoff for customers to DHS staff only to be told not eligible. This has led to an increase in customer aggression/dissatisfaction," one respondent said.

"Private call centre staff are advising customers that they cannot ask for a review of a decision unless they provide additional evidence. This is blatantly incorrect and denying the customer their right to review a claim that was incorrectly allocated by a private call centre. This meant that a customer's claim took an extra five months to be completed," said another.

Human Services staff believe that while waiting times to get calls answered initially is going down, the number is skewed because customers must wait while their call is transferred - sometimes multiple times.

"Yes the customer's call may be answered quickly initially, but then they wait longer because they are transferred two or three times to speak to the right person," one respondent said.

Staff also said Centrelink clients are ending up with debts, or without payments, due to mistakes.

"A common occurrence to have to take over a case started by a contract worker who has provided misinformation and completed a customer’s income review incorrectly causing an incorrect debt outcome for the customers," a respondent said.

Staff also reported that more people were attending service centres and saying they had been advised to do so over the phone, even though their issue could have been dealt with over the phone.

The Community and Public Sector Union has signalled that the use of contractors at the department will be a major focus of its campaigning in the lead up to the next election.

"DHS workers know the inside story on why the services they provide to the community have declined under this government, with our survey providing damning statistics particularly on the use of labour hire and privately run call centres. Workers have seen the impact of massive job cuts and now they’re also seeing the flow-on impacts from farming work out to corporate interests focussed on profits not people," the union's deputy secretary Melissa Donnelly said.

 

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^ Take that with a grain of salt.   

 

I work in I.T., and have worked for outsourcer/s on more than one Federal Govt. account (Dept.).  To say many of the APS staff are resentful of the arrangement is like saying many Italians are Catholic.  Too right they are!  You would not believe the amount of effort some staff put into trying to white-ant the "interlopers".  When they are not down the road having a coffee that is, or taking the day off on 'flex time'.     

 

So, these privatised call centre staff have my empathy.  I'll bet they are given shoddy documentation and little help from the 'in house' staff, all while being cold shouldered and peppered with unrealistic requests for service. 

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Couldn’t agree more!
Aussies back home do not understand mai pen rai. I feel sorry for them.

Thank you Thailand for not having the aggressive Australian way of life.




This article is from the November 17 issue of The Daily Telegraph Digital Edition. http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/.




AUSSIES ARE BECOMING MORE AGGRO

GOOD manners are on the decline as Australians become angrier and more aggressive, a wellbeing study suggests.

Busy lifestyles, impatience and less focus on politeness are being blamed for people increasingly getting hot under the collar.

Almost three in four adults polled believed our society was becoming more short-tempered .

Changing values and social norms were among the biggest reasons identified in the National Australia Bank research, along with drugs, alcohol,and money worries.

NAB head of behavioural economics Dean Pearson said traditional politeness and respect did not appear to be as keenly valued as in the past.

“We do not seem to be treating ourselves as politely in how we speak to each other, whether it be speaking to a child or someone serving us in a shop,” he said.

“We’re in a big hurry, so there’s intolerance and an expectation of not having things get in our way.”

The rise of social media also seemed to have added to rudeness.

Job stress, family breakdown, soft penalties for criminals and traffic congestion were other causes for society becoming angrier and more aggressive, according to the survey of 2000 Australians.


Copyright 2018 News Pty Limited

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^ There was a 'click bait' article in the fairfax media late in the week - "Boomers, your privileged, tax-deducted time is up: Millennials have arrived":

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/boomers-your-privileged-tax-deducted-time-is-up-millennials-have-arrived-20181104-p50dxj.html

 

The title says it all, piece of crap article, but it was near open warfare in the comments section.  And I think this is part of the problem - social media.  It allows us to say things we'd never say face to face, and that is flowing over into real life as the Daily Terror article of Nemises' illustrates. 

 

Read the SMH comments over a coffee if you have a spare little while.  And then wonder if there's any relationship between "Millennial' population numbers, their anger, their sense of entitlement, their social-media-savvy whining, and your pension access etc. being whittled away.  😁

 

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On ‎11‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 9:28 AM, moojar said:

^ There was a 'click bait' article in the fairfax media late in the week - "Boomers, your privileged, tax-deducted time is up: Millennials have arrived":

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/boomers-your-privileged-tax-deducted-time-is-up-millennials-have-arrived-20181104-p50dxj.html

 

The title says it all, piece of crap article, but it was near open warfare in the comments section.  And I think this is part of the problem - social media.  It allows us to say things we'd never say face to face, and that is flowing over into real life as the Daily Terror article of Nemises' illustrates. 

 

Read the SMH comments over a coffee if you have a spare little while.  And then wonder if there's any relationship between "Millennial' population numbers, their anger, their sense of entitlement, their social-media-savvy whining, and your pension access etc. being whittled away.  😁

 

I read that article the other day and it certainly got my anger levels up.

Boomers never went to war, Vietnam and conscription doesn't count?

These empty headed morons basically want Boomers to hand over their easily obtained houses(!) to them so they can afford to keep buying the latest electronic toys, fashions, boutique beard grooming and their avocado toast.

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The other day I chose to opt out of the new all-encompassing "My Health Record" scheme.  Fairly simple process.

Apart from having concerns about privacy (I'm sure ATO or CL would delve into it if they felt the need), it wouldn't be an up to date record unless they had a way of including overseas medical records.

Any thoughts?

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On 11/18/2018 at 4:36 PM, Old Croc said:

The other day I chose to opt out of the new all-encompassing "My Health Record" scheme.  Fairly simple process.

Apart from having concerns about privacy (I'm sure ATO or CL would delve into it if they felt the need), it wouldn't be an up to date record unless they had a way of including overseas medical records.

Any thoughts?

Yes, I opted out a while back too. 

 

I think on the surface it's a good idea, all your health records in one place and accessible to any doctor you go to - valuable if you're in an accident or something for example.  But I don't trust the government / the bastards to keep the access to a true 'need to know' - there is already talk of private health funds having access to our online health records.  But mostly I don't trust anything stored online.  Remember all those celebrity nudes stolen from the cloud?    

 

This sort of article helped convince me to opt out: https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/jul/22/my-health-record-identical-to-failed-uk-scheme-privacy-expert-says

 

Quote

Australia’s impending My Health Record system has a privacy framework that is identical to a failed system in England that was cancelled after it was found to be selling patient data to drug and insurance companies, a British privacy expert has said.

 

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On a lighter note, the government are promising to cut the immigration intake.

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/enough-enough-enough-scott-morrison-says-he-will-cut-australia-s-migration-intake-20181119-p50h1e.html

 

Quote

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will cut the number of migrants coming to Australia, declaring the "roads are clogged" and buses, trains and schools in Sydney and Melbourne "are full".

 

There's an election in the first half of 2019 and the Libs are well behind in the polls, so this is grain of salt stuff.  But still, the conversation is starting.  

 

It's a funny situation - NSW politicians have been pleading for years to cut the intake. But VIC are all excited about Melbourne becoming the biggest city in 15 or 20 years and seem to want the tap to stay on.  But they are doing some spectacular navel gazing lately over the deranged "terrorist" with a knife in the Melbourne CBD a couple of weeks ago, they are now statistically the 'violent crime' capital, they have an 'African gang problem', and there's breaking news today re yet another 'terrorist cell' arrest down there.  Maybe they would like a slow down in immigration now too.   

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