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BANGKOK 21 November 2018 03:37
SlyAnimal

Graduate Diploma in Teaching

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Posted (edited)

Any recommendations on universities in Thailand that offer a graduate diploma in teaching or similar?  (I.e. a 1 year course, in English, that would provide me with a full teaching license at the conclusion).

I'm not looking for something online, more looking for classes that I can attend and learn from etc.  I had one recommended to me by a colleague, but their course didn't start this term due to a lack of numbers.  If I'm going to do some study then I'll want to commit to it, so am hoping to get a few institutions that I can communicate with so that if one falls through I'd have a backup.

 

Edited by SlyAnimal

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Check with Ramkhamhaeng Univ. in Bangkok. No personal experience, but 10 yrs.ago, a then colleague did something there.

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Posted (edited)

1.  Nottingham PGCEi (UK, online & F2F)

2. Framingham State U. M.Ed. (US, online & F2F)

3.  St. Roberts/IFUGAO/PCU Grad Dip.Teaching (PH, online & F2F)

4. St. Theresa Grad. Dip. in Teaching (PH, F2F)

Edited by aidenai
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If you're going to commit to something worthwhile to improve your career then definitely do the Nottingham or Sunderland PGCEi (yes, they are mostly online).

 

I know a few people who have done them over recent years and all ended up in decent schools on good money. 

 

Any of the Thai or Filipino ones wouldn't be accepted at decent places and not improve your career or salary. If that doesn't bother you then I would assume they are a piece of p*** to complete. 

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The Nottingham education faculty is one of the most highly rated in the world, but the PGCE(i) does not give you qualified teacher status in the UK or here. It does, however, have a Thai start in October, and will give you a preferred status, though not QTS. 

 

You've raised this question in different forms several times over the years. 

 

If you don't want to go back to NZ to get QTS, why not work for a language school here rather than a government school (I think I can guess the answer, but a bit of devil's advocacy may help)?

 

 

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You've raised this question in different forms several times over the years. 
 


Completely agreed on.
@Slyanimal, if you would have followed your own advices you gave to members of this forum when you were a moderator, you would have obtained a Grad. Dip. Ed, Grad. Dip. T.P., or PGCE(i), perhaps 3 years ago.

Shame on you. Just saying.
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10 hours ago, aidenai said:

 


Completely agreed on.
@Slyanimal, if you would have followed your own advices you gave to members of this forum when you were a moderator, you would have obtained a Grad. Dip. Ed, Grad. Dip. T.P., or PGCE(i), perhaps 3 years ago.

Shame on you. Just saying.

 

And you're a self inflated, condescending know it all.  Just saying ?

 

Why would I have taken the effort/cost to study for a GradDip in the past?  I've only taught for 1 year in the past 4 (Hence why you probably haven't seen me on Thaivisa much).

Besides, I had half of the teaching licence exams finished, and was hearing about Thai teachers doing seminars to complete this pathway to their full licence.  Surely if the government was offering these to Thai teachers, they'd also offer them to foreign teachers in English right?

Except they didn't, at least not that I could find.

But even then, my Thai is pretty good, so I attended one of the Thai seminars at a Rajabhat University.  A lot of the vocabulary was academic, and it was going to require a lot of additional study in the evenings to learn the new vocab, but having an excuse to learn more Thai was half the reason I signed up anyway.

Except Krusapa advised the Rajabhat that they wouldn't give credit to foreigners for the seminars, even if I passed the same tests etc at the end as the Thai teachers.

But even then, a teacher's licence shouldn't really be that important anyway.  Work permits had been issued to other teachers at my school, who didn't have degrees or teacher's licences, every year for the past 5+ years.  They didn't stand up to the examination of immigration for the extension of Non-B visas, but I'm on a marriage extension these days so could join the club.

Except that the teacher who organized them transferred to another school, and the new teachers organizing work permits can only do so if the teacher has a licence.


But even then, that isn't a problem because I've only used my 2nd waiver, so still have a 3rd remaining.  The only caveat to that is that if I use it, I'll finally need to do some study within the next 2 years.  The only question that remains now is where to study, and when (Since I shouldn't "need" to take my 3rd waiver straight away, I can simply wait until I'm ready to study).

Which is why I've come here to ask about institutions, it isn't the first time I've done so during the almost 10 years I've been using Thaivisa, and it won't necessarily be the last either, but as time progresses more information becomes available, more institutions open courses for foreigners, particularly now with foreigners having to rely on a GradDip to get their full licence.

 

I never wanted to study via a university on the other side of the world, and especially not an online university with astronomical fees.  Studying online works for some people, but I know that face to face contact works better for me, so the Nottingham etc universities have always only been a fringe option for me.  If they were the University of Auckland, Waikato or Otago, then I'd have likely lept at the opportunity, but they aren't, and the aforementioned universities' online courses require some attendance in person.

Which is why I've been looking at alternatives, trying to find information about other available courses.  Now I know of 2 other institutions in Bangkok which offer teaching qualifications (St Teresa's & St Robert's), institutions I'd never heard of when I used to frequent TV years ago, maybe I'll hear of more soon too.  And so if it turns out that these institutions, or other institutions/options are better than the limited options I was aware of in the past, then waiting will have been in my best interests.

But hey, shame on me right?

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14 hours ago, My Thai Life said:

If you don't want to go back to NZ to get QTS, why not work for a language school here rather than a government school (I think I can guess the answer, but a bit of devil's advocacy may help)?

 

 

I live in the countryside in Isaan, so there aren't any language schools nearby (And I wouldn't move just for a job, as my wife's family are here).

 

Plus I hate Bangkok lol, I lived there for a year while I was studying Thai, and have contemplated moving there for a year to do my GradDip or to possibly study something else, but wouldn't want to live there longterm.

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Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, SlyAnimal said:

I live in the countryside in Isaan, so there aren't any language schools nearby (And I wouldn't move just for a job, as my wife's family are here).

 

Plus I hate Bangkok lol, I lived there for a year while I was studying Thai, and have contemplated moving there for a year to do my GradDip or to possibly study something else, but wouldn't want to live there longterm.

Well, you have a problem then don't you? Beggars can't be choosers.

 

StR has a newish all online option but as many constantly post here - wondering if the school will be accepted at all for the full credential, this seems an even further stretch. Qualified programs must be in classroom or at worst, mixed. I don't see how this is approved, but that is my judgement. It may also take nearly two years from the time you sign up until the time you have your 'diploma' and transcripts in hand.Check former Jenny5000s posts and I have info that concurs.

 

I am not at all certain, you need to call St Roberts but I believe they have not held classes outside Bangkok for years, at least not on any consistent basis. If YOU get a bunch of 'teachers' together, they may make that effort to serve you.

 

From my experience, you will learn absolutely nothing at 'schools' that do not use westerners or HKG/SIN as teachers. For double the money, get a real degree that is internationally portable and you can be somewhat proud of. It opens China and Vietnam to you.

 

1.5-2 years for the paperwork.

Edited by ozmeldo
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I admire your tenacity Sly.

 

Increasingly the MoE is looking for teachers with QTS from their own country; it's quite possible that this will be mandatory in the future. Online courses, even from highly reputable unis, do not provide this (as I'm sure you know).

 

I've checked the St Theresa website - does it really provide a Thai TL license? or just a route to apply for one?

 

If you want to be future-proofed I'd still recommend going "home" and getting QTS. It will also open up a wider range of options, and provide access to higher level positions.

 

Whichever route you take, your career as a foreigner in the Thai government sector will be extremely limited.

 

Good luck one way or the other, you've always struck me as being one of the most genuine posters here.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Yeah Jenny5000 has contacted me with some info about their time spent studying at St Roberts.  This is probably my preferred option as I've settled down in Thailand (Thai wife + child + house etc), and am not too worried about a better qualification, I just want to have the option of teaching in my wife's hometown without the fear of being arrested lol.


When I first came to Thailand, and was unattached, I wanted to make teaching more of a career, to try and pursue the higher salaries etc.  However I just see it as a lifestyle job now, a job which fits in well with family life ? 

Edited by SlyAnimal

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On 7/20/2018 at 9:39 AM, SlyAnimal said:

And you're a self inflated, condescending know it all.  Just saying ?

 

Why would I have taken the effort/cost to study for a GradDip in the past?  I've only taught for 1 year in the past 4 (Hence why you probably haven't seen me on Thaivisa much).

Besides, I had half of the teaching licence exams finished, and was hearing about Thai teachers doing seminars to complete this pathway to their full licence.  Surely if the government was offering these to Thai teachers, they'd also offer them to foreign teachers in English right?

Except they didn't, at least not that I could find.

But even then, my Thai is pretty good, so I attended one of the Thai seminars at a Rajabhat University.  A lot of the vocabulary was academic, and it was going to require a lot of additional study in the evenings to learn the new vocab, but having an excuse to learn more Thai was half the reason I signed up anyway.

Except Krusapa advised the Rajabhat that they wouldn't give credit to foreigners for the seminars, even if I passed the same tests etc at the end as the Thai teachers.

But even then, a teacher's licence shouldn't really be that important anyway.  Work permits had been issued to other teachers at my school, who didn't have degrees or teacher's licences, every year for the past 5+ years.  They didn't stand up to the examination of immigration for the extension of Non-B visas, but I'm on a marriage extension these days so could join the club.

Except that the teacher who organized them transferred to another school, and the new teachers organizing work permits can only do so if the teacher has a licence.


But even then, that isn't a problem because I've only used my 2nd waiver, so still have a 3rd remaining.  The only caveat to that is that if I use it, I'll finally need to do some study within the next 2 years.  The only question that remains now is where to study, and when (Since I shouldn't "need" to take my 3rd waiver straight away, I can simply wait until I'm ready to study).

Which is why I've come here to ask about institutions, it isn't the first time I've done so during the almost 10 years I've been using Thaivisa, and it won't necessarily be the last either, but as time progresses more information becomes available, more institutions open courses for foreigners, particularly now with foreigners having to rely on a GradDip to get their full licence.

 

I never wanted to study via a university on the other side of the world, and especially not an online university with astronomical fees.  Studying online works for some people, but I know that face to face contact works better for me, so the Nottingham etc universities have always only been a fringe option for me.  If they were the University of Auckland, Waikato or Otago, then I'd have likely lept at the opportunity, but they aren't, and the aforementioned universities' online courses require some attendance in person.

Which is why I've been looking at alternatives, trying to find information about other available courses.  Now I know of 2 other institutions in Bangkok which offer teaching qualifications (St Teresa's & St Robert's), institutions I'd never heard of when I used to frequent TV years ago, maybe I'll hear of more soon too.  And so if it turns out that these institutions, or other institutions/options are better than the limited options I was aware of in the past, then waiting will have been in my best interests.

But hey, shame on me right?

Why not just give up on the bureaucracy and [email protected]#@t that is teaching in Thailand and go online? Better money and you can stay with your family.

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22 minutes ago, youreavinalaff said:

Why not just give up on the bureaucracy and [email protected]#@t that is teaching in Thailand and go online? Better money and you can stay with your family.

 

The money is definitely handy, and that's what keeps me from quitting when I get frustrated, but I mainly teach as it's fun and a good way to get involved with the community.

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23 minutes ago, SlyAnimal said:

 

The money is definitely handy, and that's what keeps me from quitting when I get frustrated, but I mainly teach as it's fun and a good way to get involved with the community.

Teaching students who want to learn is fun. Not too many of those in Thai schools. There are many ways to get involved in the local community.

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Posted (edited)
On 7/21/2018 at 10:38 AM, My Thai Life said:

I admire your tenacity Sly.

 

Increasingly the MoE is looking for teachers with QTS from their own country; it's quite possible that this will be mandatory in the future. Online courses, even from highly reputable unis, do not provide this (as I'm sure you know).

 

I've checked the St Theresa website - does it really provide a Thai TL license? or just a route to apply for one?

 

If you want to be future-proofed I'd still recommend going "home" and getting QTS. It will also open up a wider range of options, and provide access to higher level positions.

 

Whichever route you take, your career as a foreigner in the Thai government sector will be extremely limited.

 

Good luck one way or the other, you've always struck me as being one of the most genuine posters here.

 

 

Regarding the underlined question, none of the PGCE or Grad Dip courses provide a TCT license, they all allow you to apply for one.  The ones that Aidenai posted are currently offered and are currently accepted by the TCT.  I don't know anyone who has taken the St. Theresa course, but I do know people who have taken all of the others and now have licenses.

 

If I was younger - say 45 or under - I would take the Nottingham or Framingham, as they are overseas universities and will be accepted in other countries.  Because I am older, I took the St. Roberts course and now have a TCT teacher's license which allows me to teach and renew my visa without any worries.

Edited by otherstuff1957

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