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BANGKOK 14 December 2018 21:59
Jonathan Fairfield

VIDEO: Dramatic new footage of Tham Luang cave rescue released

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Most awaited video : How Mu Pa footballers were rescued

 

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The Thai Navy SEAL Facebook page on Wednesday released a video clip that shows for the first time how the 13 Mu Pa Academy football team members were evacuated from the Tham Luang cave.

 

The 12 young footballers and their 25-year-old assistant coach were trapped in the cave since June 23 after flash floods blocked their exit.

 

They were rescued after a marathon operation involving Thai and foreign experts. The mission ended on June 10.

 

 

The video showed the boys being extracted from inside the flooded cave amid darkness in what was described as the first time such a method was used in a rescue operation.

 

The footage gave an insight into a complex operation that had numerous divers using pulleys, ropes and rubber piping to take the stranded footballers to safety.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30349885

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-07-12
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I guess it worked, but I would never have agreed to such a level of sedation.  Breathing is hard enough with a face mask on, never mind with reduced awareness and lung function.  Moving on.

 

  When are we going to get the details of how often the kids and the coach went in to that cave?  they went so far in, it is almost incomprehensible the passages they navigated or crawled through.  The American TV showed a one hour documentary last night that was not too sensationalistic, but it did say the coach had taken the kids in there before.

 

  What the heck sort of "team building" was this supposed to be?  Was this the Thai version of the American "Snipe hunt"?  Some strange ritual?  I mean, the TV show showed the bikes and shoes and shin pads all right there in front of the cave, so the kids did go in barefoot.   Almost unbelievable

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21 minutes ago, gk10002000 said:

I guess it worked, but I would never have agreed to such a level of sedation.  Breathing is hard enough with a face mask on, never mind with reduced awareness and lung function.  Moving on.

 

  When are we going to get the details of how often the kids and the coach went in to that cave?  they went so far in, it is almost incomprehensible the passages they navigated or crawled through.  The American TV showed a one hour documentary last night that was not too sensationalistic, but it did say the coach had taken the kids in there before.

 

  What the heck sort of "team building" was this supposed to be?  Was this the Thai version of the American "Snipe hunt"?  Some strange ritual?  I mean, the TV show showed the bikes and shoes and shin pads all right there in front of the cave, so the kids did go in barefoot.   Almost unbelievable

I read one article that claimed to have interviewed another boy on the team who did not go that day, he said he had been in there further than they were when they were trapped. It sounded like he knew the place where they were. I took that to indicate that he had been in the cave a few times at least, but it didn't say that explicitly.

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Posted (edited)

saw the video. I think the strategy they used was perfect. When I read some posts from before the rescue happened, being  against drugging the boys I did not agree.

As somebody mentioned above - much easier for the rescue team to carry a plastic strecher with a calm person than have to take care when they move on their own. Probably the boys were not totally unconscious but more in a dreaming state, still breathing spontaniously.

When you get operated you want do be sedated, unconsious, drugged. Otherwise you would suffer a lot or the operation would be impossible. Easer for the patient easier for the operator. When you wake up - everything good.

The rescue mission was kind of operation. 

And now I understand them better using the ambulances, blocking the view and the immediate transport to the hospital.

What a pity for the press, they couldn't interview the boys at the exit. I know they would have loved to.

Edited by sweatalot
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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, jerry921 said:

Well I guess that settles the debate we had in another thread about whether to sedate them. I was not correct, I thought they'd just give them some kind of light "chill pill" that left them conscious and able to act on their own rather than knock them out completely, but those who said any kind of sedation was a really bad idea were obviously the farthest off base. In retrospect, the SEALs are big strong guys and it was probably a lot easier and safer for them to drag along an unresponsive teenager on a plastic sheet stretcher than to deal with a panic under water. Biggest concern might have been making sure their face mask stayed water-tight and didn't get knocked off accidentally.

 

I wonder if the symptoms experienced by one boy (described as low pulse and irregular heart rhythm) were the result of the anesthesiologist misjudging the dose a bit. He had a tough guess to make, because normally patients are well fed and their exact weight is checked prior to sedation. I'm not a doctor and I don't know how much difference knowing the exact weight makes, but they always are very careful to find out for a hospital operation. In this case he probably had to ask the boys how much they weighed, which wouldn't have been a recent measurement, and then guess how much weight they lost due to starvation.

 

He seems to have done an excellent job under the circumstances. He should write a medical paper on the topic to pass along his knowledge and experience. I'm really glad we didn't end up with a live but brain-damaged rescuee. That was my biggest worry, that they'd get them out but drown them in the process.

They transported in supplies, equipment, tanks and god knows what else.

 

Why would you assume a scale was out of the question?

Edited by HooHaa
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