Jump to content
webfact

Thai Public Health bans foods containing trans fats

Recommended Posts

Good first move!  This will be a hit on a large food corporations that don't give a hoot about peoples' health and only care about their bottom line.  Use cheap and harmful ingredients at the expense of the unknowing and uninformed consumers.....

 

Image result for evil corporations profit over health

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about foods high in oxalic acid?

Many of us are riddled with toxic oxalate crystals that are destroying our health but the medical profession, with the exception of Dr. William Shaw, says nothing!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Topdoc said:

What about foods high in oxalic acid?

Many of us are riddled with toxic oxalate crystals that are destroying our health but the medical profession, with the exception of Dr. William Shaw, says nothing!

LOl, ok.If it is a concern you can stop eating spinach, beets, rhubarb, bran flakes etc.

And give a pass on the mass produced potato chips.  🙂 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, falang07 said:

Actually, this would be a really good thing for the health state of the population in Thailand, if they left immediately.

Yeah, good luck with that. 

 

ThaiBev agreed to purchase more than 240 existing KFC restaurants in Thailand for about 11.3 billion Thai baht ($340 million). A deal is also in place for the company to take over stores that are being developed, with the cost of those locations to be determined when the transaction closes, according to a filing. KFC is operated by Louisville, Kentucky-based Yum! Brands Inc., which also runs the Taco Bell and Pizza Hut chains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nutritionists hail ban on trans fats

By The Nation

 

1d91ef84120231476d3c6b23d4f4c144.jpeg

 

Thai nutritionists and health advocates have praised a recent Public Health Ministry regulation banning the production, import and distribution of industrially produced trans fats and food products containing them.
 

Trans fats have been linked to cardiovascular disease.

 

The June 13 ministerial regulation was published in the Royal Gazette on July 13 and widely shared on social media.

 

The ministry cited clear scientific evidence that trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated oils pose a greater risk of cardiovascular disease.

 

It said they would be banned under the Food Act 1979 beginning in six months.

 

Nutritionist Sanga Damapong on Sunday said trans fats were found in foods including crispy snacks, French fries, cookies, shortening, margarine, non-dairy creamer and dry fast foods.

 

“Trans fats can cause many deaths because they contribute to the risk of cardiovascular disease,” he said.

 

Thailand has moved quickly to ban them, he said, noting that it took the United States two or three years before it did the same in June.

 

Sanga said trans fats, a type of unsaturated fat, were first industrially produced from vegetable fats 50-60 years ago, greatly reducing the cost of manufacturing some food products while extending their shelf-life, eliminating odour and arguably making the food tastier.

 

“Since they began being used commercially around the world, people noticed an increase in non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, predominantly heart attacks and strokes, high blood pressure and diabetes,” Sanga said.

 

“Studies were conducted and trans fats were identified as the culprit.”

 

He believes the ban will have little effect on Thai food manufacturers since the ministry advised them that the ban was coming and they’ve already made adjustments.

 

They have another six months to alter product labels, he said.

 

Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Science lecturer Jessada Denduangboripant said on Facebook that the ministry regulation would close a loophole that allowed food manufacturers to claim their products had “trans fat 0 gram” when in fact they contained less than one gram of trans fats per serving.

 

“This is good for consumers because we no longer have to worry about trans fats or verifying food labels,” he said.

 

A Sunday post about the regulation on the popular Thailand-based Facebook page “Drama-addict” had garnered 20,000 likes, 15,000 comments and 10,000 shares as of Monday.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30350165

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-07-16

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, geriatrickid said:

The whole world is against you isn't it? Are you  even aware of what goes on around you? You know something as simple as the fact that the companies you cite operate in the EU and in North America and they removed artificially hydrogenated oil aka transfat from their products a decade ago? That's when the oils were banned/restricted.  It is a deadly substance and unnecessary. The only reason it continues to be used is that it allows a greater profit margin to be generated using products that would  have otherwise been unfit for human consumption. The reason oils were turned into solids was to facilitate long term storage and to allow for a longer retention of the oil before they had to be disposed of. 

 

You call it nanny state, but those of us who believe in honesty, and integrity see the requirement as protecting the public against the dangerous and  unethical practices of greedy entities who wish to harm people.  In case you missed it, Thailand has an epidemic of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, exacerbated by by the heavy use of processed "food".   Instead of lamenting the removal of a dangerous artificial substance, you should be asking why it took over  a decade for the ban to be proposed for Thailand.

 

 

Not sure I agree, western food packaging allows trans fats to be labeled as 0 if below certain levels. I agree with the desire to get rid of such harmful products but I am not sure it is possible nor am I sure it will actually happen here if it was possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, webfact said:

Thailand has moved quickly to ban them, he said, noting that it took the United States two or three years before it did the same in June.

So the USA banned them in June, other countries did so years ago, it's just appeared on the Thai agenda and they are congratulating themselves on the speedy implementation! 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So does this mean they will also ban any kind of vegetable oil ??? [They all produce trans fats when heated]
Including all other oils apart from Coconut oil and Palm Oil for cooking ??? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 19 August 2018 20:06
Sponsors
×