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Samui Bodoh

One year smoke-free; a few thoughts

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Was a heavy smoker for about 20 years (quite several times and one cig was indeed all it took to start back) and quite cold some 34 years ago (in Conakry, Guinea where a pack would have cost about 30 times more locally as added motivation - just did not order any and too cheap to pay that much extra locally - it worked).  

 

Suspect am feeling negative effects of that smoking even new - stage 2 bladder cancer two years ago could well have been a result of such smoking.  

Image result for cigarette merchants of death

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1 hour ago, Andrew Dwyer said:

First of all:

Well done OP !! you should be proud of yourself, it is certainly an achievement worthy of praise.

I, like many others, started smoking at an early age ( 13 or 14 ) , peer pressure I guess is the official title but realistically it was just wanting to be “ one of the lads” !!
After this juvenile phase had passed was the time to realise it was a stupid idea and quit but the damage was done and I was hooked.

Along came a girlfriend who became a wife and then along came children which in turn led to a more responsible lifestyle for the sake of the family and I quit smoking.
Like the OP I quit without any aids using only my willpower and the feeling that I was helping myself and my family meant that quitting smoking became easy and literally a no brainer !!

But then came the fall !
Ten whole years after I succumbed, working a traveling lifestyle with many hours to kill away from family and friends I found myself at the hotel bar in a small town in Taiwan and temptation reared it’s ugly head !
Drinking a beer with an American work associate who was in a similar situation ( far too many nights away from home in foreign lands ) it seemed that he was gaining a lot of pleasure from chain smoking his favourite brand of menthol cigarettes.
In a moment of weakness, assisted by alcohol, I foolishly “ tried “ a menthol !!
It was amazing !!, no coughing or spluttering, a deep minty taste seemed to go well with the local beer.
I spent a pleasant evening chatting with this new found friend, lamenting about our lonely traveling lifestyles, drinking copious amounts of the local brew and smoking half a pack of his newly found “ amazing “ menthol cigarettes !!
Next day after work I called in at the local convenience store to reimburse my new buddy with a pack of his favourite “ cancer sticks “. Spotting them on the shelf i motioned to the shopkeeper that this is what I wanted, raising one finger I indicated I wanted one pack but an inner unknown force somehow managed to raise an adjoining finger and before I knew it I had purchased two packs and my fate was sealed, I was back on the baccy !!
Naturally I weaned myself back onto normal smokes, Marlboro lights being my poison of choice using the excuse that “ lights “ somehow made it okay to smoke !!

A few years passed and while having a coughing fit one morning I realised that I had arose and was craving a cigarette before anything else, before coffee, before breakfast and at that moment I knew I was creating my own path to an early grave !!

I stopped that same day, probably 18 years ago, and have never put a cigarette near my lips since then, and never will.

Smoking is a foolish pastime that everyone knows is for losers .
Redemption is only achieved by quitting .

Some need a little encouragement to stop and I think the money on a jar on your desk is a good incentive. Or maybe work out how many days it takes to save xxx amount of baht and on that day buy yourself a treat ( new helmet, DVD player, new sneakers, whatever !! ) with the money accumulated.

Or just man up and go cold turkey !!
It’s really not that hard, just need to realise that you will eliminate a lot of future health issues if you do it now !!
So do it !!

( sorry about the long winded post just wanted to put forward my opinion that it’s not hard to stop but keeping stopped is the real battle !! )

Excellent post.

 

You have described the scenario that frightens the hell out of me. I don't really drink anymore, but that insidious thought of 'go on, one little smoke won't hurt...' is terrifying; I have visions of the imaginary devil on my shoulder that we sometimes see in bad movies.

 

As I noted in my post, I am confident in my ability to keep not smoking, but let me ask a question to you or to anyone else out there;

 

When does the thinking about smoking end?

 

There is one habit that, no matter what, I still haven't been able to lose. Every time I leave the house (it seems), I find myself unconsciously patting my upper shirt pocket to see if my smokes are there. Obviously they aren't there, but I notice the gesture quite frequently, and assume that I am still doing it even when I don't actively notice it.

 

Any thoughts? We are all different, but I would be curious if anyone would provide an answer...

 

Cheers

 

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Excellent post.
 
You have described the scenario that frightens the hell out of me. I don't really drink anymore, but that insidious thought of 'go on, one little smoke won't hurt...' is terrifying; I have visions of the imaginary devil on my shoulder that we sometimes see in bad movies.
 
As I noted in my post, I am confident in my ability to keep not smoking, but let me ask a question to you or to anyone else out there;
 
When does the thinking about smoking end?
 
There is one habit that, no matter what, I still haven't been able to lose. Every time I leave the house (it seems), I find myself unconsciously patting my upper shirt pocket to see if my smokes are there. Obviously they aren't there, but I notice the gesture quite frequently, and assume that I am still doing it even when I don't actively notice it.
 
Any thoughts? We are all different, but I would be curious if anyone would provide an answer...
 
Cheers
 

Sometimes smoking is more of a habit than an urge .

When I was 17 I passed my driving test and borrowed my mother’s car every evening to visit the gf ( until leaving home at 20 ).
I would depress the cigarette lighter and by the time I had reversed the car out of the drive and pointed it in the right direction it had popped up ready to light the cigarette already in my mouth.
Whether I felt the urge to smoke or not I don’t remember it was just automatic !!
These habits need to be replaced with something else, I guess I could have had chewing gum in the car to replace the lighting up, would have probably worked.

So, find a replacement for your habit or urges is the answer I suppose.
Difficult when you want to smoke while drinking I know, maybe take up darts ? .

If you still have urges after 1 year then you should think about some replacement.


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It's probably just muscle memory, so I wouldn't worry about patting your top pocket until suddenly, one day, you find .... lol. Just joking. 

 

The bad news is that you'll never stop thinking about smoking. It's not possible simply because of the influences that are around you pretty much all of the time - that might be seeing someone sneak outside for a fag, or giving yourself a little self-praise for having achieved a goal aided by clear lungs. The urge for a smoke will also arise from time to time, but I think you already know that. There is no magic formula to stopping it, so I find that the best way to control the urge is simply to carry on with my business as usual and let it pass naturally. I quit both smoking and drinking at the same time, and like you, I fear the black dog in the corner should I get back on the turps again (I can drink if I want to, I just decided not to).

 

PS: Another urge to overcome is the desire to lecture smokers or bitch about their habit. I find this counter-productive and just simply let things flow. They all know, anyway.

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I don’t find I have the urge anymore, in fact I find it repulsive and wonder what on earth I ever saw in the habit.

When I stopped I guess there was a period when I struggled against the urge especially when I was drinking.
Not sure how I overcame that it was a long time ago but I certainly don’t have any desire to smoke now.
I don’t drink now but that’s only changed in the last 3 years so didn’t affect my stopping smoking.

I have to agree with Dexlowes last statement. It doesn’t work trying to preach to smokers to stop and I wouldn’t do that in person, only a little bit on TVF .
It wouldn’t do any good anyway and I wouldn’t have appreciated it in my smoking period. If smokers just respect the “ clean air” of others then they are free to do as they please IMO.


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I'm in my late 50's and thus come from a generation and time when everyone smoked. Teachers used to smoke in class. The Flintstones hawked cigarettes on TV. Doctors preferred Camels. My mom and dad smoked. My sister smoked. Every single one of my friends smoked. But not me. I never did. I never tried. There was no desire to ever try, I always hated it. I had absolutely no peer pressure at all.

 

I remember as a young kid sitting on my grandfather's lap while dad drove the car, no seatbelts of course, and them both puffing away. I always wound the window down regardless of weather and closed the ashtray as soon as they were done. I remember granddad saying to my dad, "This one'll never smoke!"

 

I can't tell you how many times I have vocalized my happiness for never having started. I've never met a smoker who says they're glad they started.

 

Good for you OP. Well done and keep it up. haha......

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5 hours ago, Samui Bodoh said:

It means going to bed one night as a smoker, waking up the next as a non-smoker.

Or, as in my case, leaving one airport (BKK) as a smoker and arriving at the other airport (AMST) as a non smoker....

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I'm in my late 50's and thus come from a generation and time when everyone smoked. Teachers used to smoke in class. The Flintstones hawked cigarettes on TV. Doctors preferred Camels. My mom and dad smoked. My sister smoked. Every single one of my friends smoked. But not me. I never did. I never tried. There was no desire to ever try, I always hated it. I had absolutely no peer pressure at all.
 
I remember as a young kid sitting on my grandfather's lap while dad drove the car, no seatbelts of course, and them both puffing away. I always wound the window down regardless of weather and closed the ashtray as soon as they were done. I remember granddad saying to my dad, "This one'll never smoke!"
 
I can't tell you how many times I have vocalized my happiness for never having started. I've never met a smoker who says they're glad they started.
 
Good for you OP. Well done and keep it up. haha......

Good for you man, certainly wish I had never smoked !!

I once found a carton of Kent cigarettes at the back of one of the kitchen cabinets, they must have been my fathers who had smoked briefly while in College, must have been there at least 20 years.

Yup, I smoked the lot !!


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Congratulations ! 

It gets easier (to stay away from cigarettes) as time goes by. I've been "clean" for almost 6 1/2 years now. 

These days all it takes is a whiff of someone's smoke to make me cringe (inside) and remind me of all the reasons I quit and don't want to ever start again. I have to control myself if I am close to someone that just had a cigarette as the urge to make a face and shy away (while waving my hand to try and fan away the smell) is strong.

 

I don't (generally) nag on people that do smoke as I've been there and know how hard it is to quit but I will tell them why I quit and offer suggestions if they want to quit as well. My dad smoked for (about) 62 of his 77 years, including his final 2 years after he'd been diagnosed with lung cancer. In his words, it was the only vice he had left.
Even after watching him waste away and finally pass on, I still wasn't motivated to quit myself.

 

Until I noticed my own health starting to suffer. About 1 1/2 years after dad passed on I noticed that I was getting the hacking cough with every puff and the "wheezing" breathing to go along with the lungs that always seemed to be congested. When I was younger I'd only get the hack if I lit up right after doing some heavy physical exertion. Then it started happening with the first puff of each cigarette. Then it started happening with each puff of each cigarette.
I was so used to that happening with dad that I'd actually became conditioned to pausing in the middle of sentence to let him finish hacking up a lung, then I'd carry on with the rest of the sentence. It finally dawned on me that I might not even live as long as dad did if I kept going the way I was.

 

I feel so much better since I quit. No more hacking cough, wheezing breath, congested lungs. No more stinking breath, clothes and house. No more cravings to have a cigarette, especially at times when you simply can't.

 

I like being able to sit on an airplane for 10-12 hours and not care that I can't smoke. I like being able to sit somewhere and know that I don't reek like a smelly ashtray. I like yawning or taking a deep breath without breaking into a fit of coughing and horking up lung oysters.

I forget what the supposed timeline is for how long it takes to get back to being on about the same level (health-wise) as someone who never smoked, but I like to think that if I hadn't quit, I might not even be here today !
I did put on some weight after I quit but I'm working on getting rid of that now. It'll take some effort but it will be worth it. 

Of course now, with the benefit of hindsight, I wish I'd never started smoking or, at the very least, could have quit when I was still in my teens or early 20s, but that was a different era and a different attitude towards smoking back then.

 

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7 minutes ago, helloagain said:

Many come here to smoke and drink yourself to early death, good luck to you

I think in the far off future that a lifetime of modern day eating habits will send more folk to an early death...

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Congratulations! One year down, the rest of your life to go. At this stage you are only a reformed smoker. It will get easier as time progresses. Trust me.

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