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BANGKOK 17 October 2018 05:53

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Am I able to apply for my Thai citizenship in the U.S. if I am in Thailand? My mother being Thai and I'm born American. Will they all correspondent by mail with all my paperwork?

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16 minutes ago, Jeffreyza said:

if I am in Thailand?

you mean NOT in Thailand?

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If your mother is Thai, then aren't you Thai wherever you were born?

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You already have Thai nationality. The only thing you need is proof of it. That requires getting a Thai birth certificate from the Thai embassy or one of the official consulates in the US if that was where you were born.

Here is info for doing the application on the embassy website. http://thaiembdc.org/thai-birth-certificate-eng/

You can submit the application at the Department of Consular Affairs of the MFA in Bangkok. They will then forward it to the embassy in Washington DC.

After have your birth certificate you would have to be registered in house book at an Amphoe to get a Thai ID number.. You would need the permission of the head of household shown in house book to do be registered in it. After the registration is done you could get a Thai ID card and passport.

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Don't forget that as long as you are under 30 you can be drafted for military in Thailand, so it might make sense to wait until you are 30

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If you are in Thailand now get an official (certified) birth certificate from the state in which you were born. Take that birth certificate to the US Embassy Consulate Citizens Affairs office and complete an affidavit stating it is your true birth certificate and have the Consulate sign and stamp it. Take both documents to a translation office (several at Phloenchit BTS area) and have them translate and get MFA approval. Get a copy of your mother's ID card, House Registration and passport. Take all the documents to the district office where you intend to be placed in a House Registration Book along with two witnesses. Most district offices will accept this method and it saves a lot of time and expense dealing with Embassy in WDC. Some office want a little more documentation to prove your identity and mother's Thai nationality, but mine did not when I used this method to get my son's ID card and passport.

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4 hours ago, jackdd said:

Don't forget that as long as you are under 30 you can be drafted for military in Thailand, so it might make sense to wait until you are 30

We had the same concerns with my stepson. 

I’d adopted him years ago, so he held a US passport. Before he left for college in the US he renounced Thai citizenship, so if and when he ever returned to Thailand for a visit there would never be any issues of him having missed the military draft circus

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1 hour ago, GinBoy2 said:

We had the same concerns with my stepson. 

I’d adopted him years ago, so he held a US passport. Before he left for college in the US he renounced Thai citizenship, so if and when he ever returned to Thailand for a visit there would never be any issues of him having missed the military draft circus

When you say ‘renounce’ - do you mean he submitted an application to the Minister of Interior and the renunciation was posted in the royal gazette?

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We(he) since he was 18, submitted it to the Government. If it was posted in some royal gazette, I have no idea. To be honest we don't really care. He won't go back to live in Thailand, it was more to ensure that if he entered Thailand on his US passport for a vacation there would never be a problem

Edited by GinBoy2

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I was born in the U.S. I've lived in Thailand on and off for 10 years. I just see a lot of benefits from having a Thai nationality also.

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10 hours ago, GinBoy2 said:

I’d adopted him years ago, so he held a US passport. Before he left for college in the US he renounced Thai citizenship, so if and when he ever returned to Thailand for a visit there would never be any issues of him having missed the military draft circus

That was an extreme measure to take since there is more than one way to avoid being drafted.

If living outside Thailand and attending school a waiver can be a applied for at a Thai embassy or official consulate.

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25 minutes ago, ubonjoe said:

That was an extreme measure to take since there is more than one way to avoid being drafted.

If living outside Thailand and attending school a waiver can be a applied for at a Thai embassy or official consulate.

It more a case that even back then, we knew it was only a matter of time before we all moved back. It was never going to be a temporary thing. 

Voy has made a new life for himself, job, girlfriend, for us it just simplified things. He’s totally American, US citizen, can get a Mexican passport as well because of me as well, he has no need for a rather useless Thai passport

 

Now we’re all back here, me and Mrs G are a few hours drive from him and my daughter, who he actually rents a room from.

 

Pretty soon he’s gonna marry his girlfriend, then we might actually get some grandkids, since my girls seem rather uninterrestested in procreation LOL

Edited by GinBoy2

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