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BANGKOK 15 November 2018 00:29
yosib157

Brother in Law

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Hi there,

 

I have tried many online translation services (which as usual contradict each other) -- I even asked the missus who came up with uncle as I think one of the online systems shows?

So, I'm after a general translation for 'brother-in-law'. Is there one which covers every relative or, is there one for husband of older and younger sister? Either way I need it for next weekend's nieces wedding. After almost 2 decades I have every family member's name but missing the term for Brother-in-Law when I gather them together for photographs.

 

Thanks in advance

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According to Thai gf

Brother in law of younger sister Nong Kuey, Brother in law of older sister Pee Kuey.

 

Sorry for typing it how i hear it. This is what the GF says.

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13 minutes ago, robblok said:

According to Thai gf

Brother in law of younger sister Nong Kuey, Brother in law of older sister Pee Kuey.

 

Sorry for typing it how i hear it. This is what the GF says.

Tx for that quick response. Wife's out at the moment but I see what other suggestions I get and probably will go with the consensus.

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2 hours ago, robblok said:

Brother in law of younger sister Nong Kuey

น้องเขย  nóng kŏie       younger brother-in-law

Listen:

http://www.clickthai-online.de/cgi-bin/playmp3.pl?188247

 

But be aware: my German/Thai dictionary supplies 10(!) different translations/variations.

เขย  kŏie

is the "generic" word for male relatives by marriage (son in law, brother in law).

Edited by KhunBENQ

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Sorry, I started and then realised I was talking a load of b...ox.

 

 

But I was going to say that he is not the brother-in-law of older/younger sister, they are THEIR husbands, but YOUR brothers in law.

 

A bit off topic, but I had a friend and his father who married two sisters. So they were brothers-in-law, if he had a child with his wife, then his father would be grandfather and also uncle (by marriage). 

Edited by wgdanson
  • Haha 1

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2 hours ago, KhunBENQ said:

พี่เขย  pêe kŏie       brother-in-law

Listen:

http://www.clickthai-online.de/cgi-bin/playmp3.pl?252201

 

 

Thanks guys. I'm going with the excellent info from KhunBENQ and another friend who says the same. I'll run it past the missus when she comes back from yet another temple tamboon.

And yes, I did mean hers (who are also my) brothers-in-law as she has a house full of pee sow.

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brother-in-law n. (older) พี่เขย pîi-kə̌əi

 

brother-in-law n. (younger) น้องเขย nɔ́ɔng-kə̌əi

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The husbands of your wife’s พี่สาว are not your พี่เขย because they have not married one of your relatives.
These are definitions, names are far more likely to be used in the family.



Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

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4 hours ago, tgeezer said:

The husbands of your wife’s พี่สาว are not your พี่เขย because they have not married one of your relatives.
These are definitions, names are far more likely to be used in the family.



Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

 

in that case the word for the relationship is เกี่ยวดอง or ดอง when there's relation due to the in laws

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My answer to that is of course, I don t know. I've only just started looking up these words in longdo.
There is a danger of me discovering my ignorance of familial relationships in English. I have two brothers both married, I call the girls my sisters in law, they call me their brother in law but I am not married to any sibling of theirs. I am their husband's brother. I feel that my sisters in law may have it wrong.
If we were Thai and I was married to either one's sister I would be that one's brother in law but to the other one I would still be only her husband's younger brother.
I think that เกี่ยวดอง (related by marriage), if you felt that you were, or เป็นหญาติกันอย่างซับซ้อน is the explanation someone might give when cornered don't you?

Can we pin it down?



Sent from my iPad using Thaivisa Connect

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On 11/12/2018 at 1:30 AM, digbeth said:

 

in that case the word for the relationship is เกี่ยวดอง or ดอง when there's relation due to the in laws

As I originally wrote, after 18 years names, relationships and who belongs to who is no problem. The event we are attending is the wedding of our (our because I married her aunt and they are all my adopted family)  oldest niece. For years I have wanted to be there when all the wife's siblings are gathered together with their offspring and theirs. So, hopefully as we are all traveling in with the now 4 generations. No family feuds, nobody in hospital or run off with a n other and so on. 

In these days of Smartphones and (brilliant) hd pictures, I still want to use my little camera and muster them all together in the groups I want. Brother -in-Law was the only relatives name I didn't know to get their attention. Then print them and label accordingly.

I'm not in the best of health so it's possibly the last chance I'll have.

So, getting the right name pronunciation and spelling from some of you guys has made me very happy. Hey, even the wife says I pronounce it correctly. An added bonus.

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