Jump to content
BANGKOK 10 December 2018 15:14
webfact

Singaporean's Porsche hits police in Krabi

Recommended Posts

Singaporean's Porsche hits police in Krabi

 

561000012395602.jpg

Picture: Manager Online

 

A Singaporean businessman was arrested and charged after his speeding Porsche lost control and hit a police officer at a speed checkpoint on a Krabi road on Thursday morning.

 

Sen Sgt Maj Suriya Chumduang suffered from hip and leg injuries and was treated at Krabi Hospital.

 

Simon Ong Chin Sim, 65, was arrested after his car spun and its left wheel hit the officer while he was removing traffic cones at the checkpoint on Phetkasem Road in front of the 12th Forestry Resources Management Office In Krabi's Muang district.

 

Five Porsches were seen driving from Phuket toward the checkpoint at about 100kmh.

 

561000012395601.jpg

Picture: Manager Online

 

The first car tried to slow and police said Sim's car was the third. He apparently tried to swerve left to avoid the second car but his vehicle spun.

 

He was charged with reckless driving causing injury.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/breakingnews/30359555

 
thenation_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-11-30

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, webfact said:

The first car tried to slow

Brake issues?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Briggsy said:

I have encountered a number of police checkpoints in Thailand in, frankly, incredibly dangerous locations. e.g 1. on a stretch of 2 or 3-lane highway one may suddenly encounter a few cones placed in a line at 30 degrees to the kerb, abruptly closing the outer 2 lanes.

2. just over a crest, or just around a curve deliberately to catch in a very low-tech manner, using surprise, the motorcyclist not wearing a helmet.

3. maybe the worst type, jumping into the traffic to stop it.

4. Even worse than number 3, jumping into the second or third lane of traffic from a concealed position behind slow-moving traffic in lanes 1 or 2.

 

These checkpoints are ridiculously dangerous. They create danger which did not exist otherwise. They are moronic and yet seem to be included in some kind of informal police training here.

 

I don't know if this happened here. But I can imagine a scenario where the convoy of Singaporeans suddenly found the lanes blocked by police or cones, almost certainly with no warning. (A warning would warn drivers and decrease the take, which is the whole point of these roadblocks.)

Worst one I encountered was during a trip up north, I think it was in Phrae, they had set up the bloody checkpoint at the foot of a steep hill between the mountains behind a curve so basically you can't see them till you are less than 50 metres away. Luckily traffic was almost nil. Bunch of morons..

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree, these checkpoints are dangerous, why not use Radar Guns to check the speed ?

Hit a few more cops then maybe they'll stop using them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought these checkpoints (Fleecing points) were going to be stopped, announced sometime last year i think, maybe it was for one day only though, silly me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Briggsy said:

I have encountered a number of police checkpoints in Thailand in, frankly, incredibly dangerous locations. e.g 1. on a stretch of 2 or 3-lane highway one may suddenly encounter a few cones placed in a line at 30 degrees to the kerb, abruptly closing the outer 2 lanes.

2. just over a crest, or just around a curve deliberately to catch in a very low-tech manner, using surprise, the motorcyclist not wearing a helmet.

3. maybe the worst type, jumping into the traffic to stop it.

4. Even worse than number 3, jumping into the second or third lane of traffic from a concealed position behind slow-moving traffic in lanes 1 or 2.

 

These checkpoints are ridiculously dangerous. They create danger which did not exist otherwise. They are moronic and yet seem to be included in some kind of informal police training here.

 

I don't know if this happened here. But I can imagine a scenario where the convoy of Singaporeans suddenly found the lanes blocked by police or cones, almost certainly with no warning. (A warning would warn drivers and decrease the take, which is the whole point of these roadblocks.)

So knowing points 1-4 how fast you should be driving in Thailand? Pedal to the metal or? Which one you can change, a) your driving style or b) checkpoints and other mayhem going on in Thai roads?

Edited by FinChin67
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can understand the consternation concerning 'hidden checkpoints' but I also understand why the Thais don't 'advertise' where they're set up. Considering that there are literally tons of hard drugs being ferried on these roads and the propensity for Thai drivers to 'run' when facing arrest, to give advanced notice of them defeats their purpose. I do know that the biggest mafia in the country (the police) do abuse the system for self enrichment but the fact remains the check points are a necessary evil. The drug trafficking will never cease (unless the profit is removed) so there is little the authorities can do except to use band aid solutions like these check points. When driving on any road you're expected to have care and control of your vehicle, coming across a 'sudden' check point isn't any different than encountering an unexpected obstacle in the road. It's on you to drive at a speed that allows you to react to the unexpected.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Briggsy said:

I have encountered a number of police checkpoints in Thailand in, frankly, incredibly dangerous locations. e.g 1. on a stretch of 2 or 3-lane highway one may suddenly encounter a few cones placed in a line at 30 degrees to the kerb, abruptly closing the outer 2 lanes.

2. just over a crest, or just around a curve deliberately to catch in a very low-tech manner, using surprise, the motorcyclist not wearing a helmet.

3. maybe the worst type, jumping into the traffic to stop it.

4. Even worse than number 3, jumping into the second or third lane of traffic from a concealed position behind slow-moving traffic in lanes 1 or 2.

 

These checkpoints are ridiculously dangerous. They create danger which did not exist otherwise. They are moronic and yet seem to be included in some kind of informal police training here.

 

I don't know if this happened here. But I can imagine a scenario where the convoy of Singaporeans suddenly found the lanes blocked by police or cones, almost certainly with no warning. (A warning would warn drivers and decrease the take, which is the whole point of these roadblocks.)

An excellent post and the most likely scenario in my opinion 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, JoePai said:

Agree, these checkpoints are dangerous, why not use Radar Guns to check the speed ?

Hit a few more cops then maybe they'll stop using them

I believe most of the checkpoints are to confirm registration and insurance not speed, (and to collect tea money and donations to the Police benevolent fund)!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×