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BANGKOK 19 December 2018 02:38
Rimmer

Jomtien traffic lines confuse

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21 hours ago, Just Weird said:

From the OP...

 

you are completely WRONG nothing to do with making drivers slow down....it means do NOT enter unless it is clear to do so.....OK

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10 hours ago, marko kok prong said:

What annoy,s me is seeing tourists and indeed expats driving bikes without a helmet,they would never do so in their home country.

 

Since they don't put me in any danger or affect me in any manner whatsoever, they don't even rate my attention.  I'll save my ire for the ones that endanger everyone in their immediate vicinity.

 

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Some of this hatching has appeared at Junc of Nua and Pettrakil near T21. It seems that a surplus of yellow paint has been purchased and it is being used up before year end or use by date.

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I like it.

Give them some credit, they are trying to do something.

The whole crossing looks much more "serious" now.

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17 hours ago, marko kok prong said:

What annoy,s me is seeing tourists and indeed expats driving bikes without a helmet,they would never do so in their home country.

Depends which country. They might be carrying a gun too, dread to think of that situation in Thailand! I also sometimes pop out without a helmet, usually just a quick run to say the 7-11. I would not do it on my frequent runs to town where Sukhumvit is involved. Many locals do. 

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250px-King_William_Street_from_The_Monum
 
A box junction in London, pictured from atop the Monument in 1969.

A box junction is a road traffic control measure designed to prevent congestion and gridlock at junctions. The surface of the junction is typically marked with a criss-cross grid of diagonal painted lines (or only two lines crossing each other in the box), and vehicles may not enter the area so marked unless their exit from the junction is clear, or they are intending to turn right and are prevented from doing so by oncoming traffic, or other vehicles on the box waiting to turn right.

Box junctions were introduced in UK during 1967, following a successful trial in London.[1] In both Ireland and the United Kingdom (where cars drive on the left), drivers may enter the box and wait when they want to turn right and are stopped from doing so only by oncoming traffic or by other vehicles waiting to turn right.[2]

Similar yellow boxes may be painted on other areas of roadway which must be kept free of queuing traffic, such as exits from emergency vehicle depots or level crossings.

Box junctions are most widely used in many European countries such as Cyprus, Ireland, Malta, Portugal, Serbia and the United Kingdom; in parts of the United States

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