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BANGKOK 14 December 2018 03:07
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Sailing - British Golden Globe yachtswoman rescued by cargo ship

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Sailing - British Golden Globe yachtswoman rescued by cargo ship

 

LONDON (Reuters) - British solo round-the-world yachtswoman Susie Goodall was rescued by a cargo ship on Friday after her boat capsized and lost its mast during a violent storm in the southern Pacific Ocean.

 

The 29-year-old, the youngest entrant in the Golden Globe race, had waited two days for the Hong Kong-registered Tian Fu to arrive after sending a distress signal from 2,000 nautical miles west of Cape Horn.

 

The signal was picked up by Falmouth Coastguard in southwest England, with the alert passed on to race control and the Chilean maritime search and rescue authorities.

 

"ON THE SHIP!!!," she said on her Twitter feed after the rescue.

 

Race organisers had earlier reported plans to lift the sailor from the deck of her yacht DHL Starlight using one of the cranes on the 38,000 tonne ship, which was heading to Argentina from China when diverted.

 

They said conditions had moderated, with three- to four-metre swells.

 

Goodall, who was in fourth place at the time of the incident, had been knocked out when the boat rolled end over end in the dismasting.

 

The Golden Globe was marking the 50th anniversary of the race, won in 1969 by Britain's Robin Knox-Johnston who became the first person to sail solo non-stop around the world.

 

 
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-- © Copyright Reuters 2018-12-08

 

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He who would go down to the sea for sport, would go to hell just to pass the time of day.

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18 hours ago, car720 said:

He who would go down to the sea for sport, would go to hell just to pass the time of day.

I love that saying, is it yours? If not who's? If I had to guess, and I have to guess, I would say Joseph Conrad or Herman Melville. 

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1 hour ago, riceyummm said:

I love that saying, is it yours? If not who's? If I had to guess, and I have to guess, I would say Joseph Conrad or Herman Melville. 

A sailors' proverb. □ 1899 A. J. Boyd Shellback viii.

 

All donations above $1000 greatfully received.

Leave your money on the fridge.

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What happens to the stricken boat in a case like this?

 

Many cases of sailors being plucked from their stricken boats over the years but never seem to hear of what happens to their boats or life raft or whatever they were on.

 

Does the rescue ship also pick up the boat or are they just left to drift as a hazard to other shipping till eventually they sink or are washed up on a distant beach somewhere?

 

 

 

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I am guessing they are left till they are sunk by collision with a washed-over container. Or run aground on a remote island, to form the basis of a bizarre religion amongst an undiscovered tribe; should that read ‘a tribe yet to discover the modern world’*

 

* A friend of mine once posted a story, written some time later by the natives of those lands, of how the Innuit discovered The Scottish Islands some four hundred years ago

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