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BANGKOK 18 January 2019 09:10
Daffy D

Is there any way to test a power supply?

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So the kids computer had been playing up, sometimes not starting and very slow.

 

Had dig around and replaced the power supply which seemed to fix the problem.  

 

Running a scan on the HDD threw up several faults, so replaced that also and that seems to have solved the problems.

 

Thing is I'm not sure if the original power supply was actually faulty, could have been the bad HHD all along, so reluctant to throw away what might be a perfectly good unit I wonder if there is a way of testing the power supply unit, without installing it in a computer, to make sure, if it is faulty or not. 

 

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You could do very basic tests on voltage but that most likely only be able to prove it is bad.  Even if the voltages measure ok, you would need to find a way of testing it under load to check if it is actually "good".

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Here is a good place to start.

 

 

I tend to put "suspect" bits on the shelf until I need one, then fire it up, if it works, great, if it doesn't go shopping 🙂

 

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Thanks crossy I know about the paper clip test.

 

The computer did fire up and the HDD did work so the power supply does work, but as JaiMaai mention really need to test under load.

 

Think I'll just bin it, not worth messing about hoping it might be alright.

 

colinneil - The finger (wet) in the socket test was my first thought but unfortunately that only works on mains voltage so ruled that out. :whistling:

 

crossy - I also used to keep old suspect bits of gear but found I would never use them because they were "suspect". realized it was a waste of time replacing  a bad unit with a dodgy one, so now I just cut off the wires with the various plugs on them and any switches and sockets that might come in useful and put the rest out for our local dustbin diving recycle man. :thumbsup:

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4 hours ago, bendejo said:

There was a fellow on here a while back who said he would give this method a try.

We haven't heard from him since.

:w00t:

 

 

Guess it must have worked - Shame he didn't stay around to use it  :whistling: 

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8 minutes ago, Daffy D said:

Looks like there is a safer way of testing:-

https://www.lazada.co.th/products/2024-i10100120-s12650690.html?spm=a2o4m.searchlist.list.17.ad377bb9KfOsWm&search=1

 

Tester.JPG.dea47c8ee6bc7682e2b559286f7b0300.JPG

All this modern technology stuff take the fun and excitement out of the good old finger test :sad:

I know it is only a couple of hundred baht, but how often would you use it? How many times in the last 5 years have you suspected your power supply to be faulty?

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23 hours ago, Daffy D said:

So the kids computer had been playing up, sometimes not starting and very slow.

 

Did you ask them what software they had downloaded and installed, or what settings they had altered?

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Good point about the amount of use a tester would actually get.

 

At the moment I have possibly a faulty power supply which I can just throw away or spend a couple of hundred baht on a tester and find it is not faulty after all thereby, for the couple of hundred outlay saving about 1000 Baht on buying a new one. :thumbsup: 

 

OR testing shows the power supply to actually be faulty so would throw it away, in which case I could have thrown it away originally without spending the couple of hundred baht on a tester which I probably will never use again. :sad:

 

Argggg!! These kind of decisions are way above my paygrade. :wacko:

 

I keep a pretty close eye on the kids computer, the problem here was almost certainly the faulty hard drive which showed up a whole bunch of faults when checked.
 

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Why not just plug the 'faulty' power supply back into the 'now repaired - HDD replaced' PC and see if the original fault starts again, if so it's a dud and chuck it, if not then fault was probably HDD.

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I'm a electrical engineer. If your computer's performance slows, it has nothing to do with the power supply. If thing stop working or it doesn't boot (post) then the power supply could be one of the reason, but it would be the only one.

 

Performance issues usually relate to software, and those components that directly interact with the software (like hard drive, memory, CPU and Graphics card).

 

If you are running Microsoft Windows there are cases were it gets slower over time as you install and/or remove software. I would always run a virus scan first, then hard drive check/scan, and then performance scan (My virus softeare includes a performance scan). Once every few years I actually re-install the operating system to give it a fresh start.

 

Note: if you ever see a hardware error on your HDD.. back it up and replace it A.S.A.P. Modern HDD have built in error correction systems, and will correct as may faults as it can. If you see a HDD ether directly (reported by the operating system), or after running a scan, it means your HDD has corrected everything it can and now you need to do something.

 

I hope this helps.

 

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58 minutes ago, reallybigken said:

I'm a electrical engineer. If your computer's performance slows, it has nothing to do with the power supply. If thing stop working or it doesn't boot (post) then the power supply could be one of the reason, but it would be the only one.

 

Performance issues usually relate to software, and those components that directly interact with the software (like hard drive, memory, CPU and Graphics card).

 

If you are running Microsoft Windows there are cases were it gets slower over time as you install and/or remove software. I would always run a virus scan first, then hard drive check/scan, and then performance scan (My virus softeare includes a performance scan). Once every few years I actually re-install the operating system to give it a fresh start.

 

Note: if you ever see a hardware error on your HDD.. back it up and replace it A.S.A.P. Modern HDD have built in error correction systems, and will correct as may faults as it can. If you see a HDD ether directly (reported by the operating system), or after running a scan, it means your HDD has corrected everything it can and now you need to do something.

 

I hope this helps.

 

 

 

i had performance issues, slowdowns, etc. turns out my power supply was good but not watt rated adequately to handle the harware connected. power hungry gpu, multiple hard drives, etc .  upgraded the power supply and all is well.  removed ps works great in a different computer with less power demands

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On ‎1‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 4:29 AM, bendejo said:

There was a fellow on here a while back who said he would give this method a try.

We haven't heard from him since.

You mean that you not go to the funeral NICE

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