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BANGKOK 17 January 2019 10:38
Daffy D

Is there any way to test a power supply?

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Running slow was just one of the symptoms but on reflection that was probably just in comparison with my own computer which has a better CPU and SSD and would boot up in about 25 seconds compared to the kids taking over a minute.

 

The real problems that made me suspect the power supply was that sometimes the thing would not boot up at all or it would boot up but the monitor would not switch on.

 

By replacing the power supply seemed to fix these problems.

 

Having the computer seemingly running OK I did the regular updates and virus scans but when it came to do a Macrium back-up got disk error fail. Macrium recommended ckdisk scan which showed no disk fault. :wacko: 

 

I then took the kids disk plugged it into my own computer and ran Hard Disk Sentinel and Crystal Disk scan both of which showed up several faults on the disk. 

 

I replaced the kids HDD with a new one and after several days it still all seems to be working just fine now.

 

Still don't know if the power supply is good or not. Could have had double fault power supply and HDD.

 

The replacement power supply is one that was knocking about and a lower rating than the one I took out so that should not be a problem. As suggested easiest way to check the power supply now the computer is working OK is to swap the "replacement" with the "original" and see what happens.

 

Oh! Happy Days  :guitar:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Update:

So I restored the original the power supply, which I thought was faulty, and it's been running fine for a couple of days now so seems the only fault was with the drive, nothing to do with the power supply.

All's well that ends well.:thumbsup:

 

Some additional info for replacing drive "D" without having to reinstall the whole operating system and your settings, programs and apps.

 

An internet search suggests making a clone of the old onto the new. Well that did not work for me, presumably because of the faults on the old drive.

 

Trying to make a backup with Macrium also failed because of "drive read error" from the old drive.

Fortunately Macrium has an option "ignore bad sectors when creating images" so was able to make a full backup with possibly some bad sectors. I then restored that backup onto the new drive and Yep! it works. Don't know about any missing data from the bad sectors, seems to be working just fine.

 

So seems an easy way to upgrade your old HDD to a new SSD without having to reinstall everything is just to make a full image backup of the old disk and then restore that onto the new disk.

 

Does not seem to matter if the new disk is smaller than the old, as long as the data on it is less than the size of the new disk it should work.

 

In my case the old disk was a 350Gb HHD and the new a 250Gb SSD and the data was less than 100Gb so still plenty of room on the new SSD.

 

Happy Ducky :smile:
 

 

 

 

 

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On 1/10/2019 at 6:15 PM, Daffy D said:

Looks like there is a safer way of testing:-

https://www.lazada.co.th/products/2024-i10100120-s12650690.html?spm=a2o4m.searchlist.list.17.ad377bb9KfOsWm&search=1

 

Tester.JPG.dea47c8ee6bc7682e2b559286f7b0300.JPG

All this modern technology stuff take the fun and excitement out of the good old finger test :sad:

This is just a voltage tester. It doesn't test the supply under load. you could to the same with a volt meter. This just makes it easier (witch is good).

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On 1/11/2019 at 9:51 PM, atyclb said:

 

 

i had performance issues, slowdowns, etc. turns out my power supply was good but not watt rated adequately to handle the harware connected. power hungry gpu, multiple hard drives, etc .  upgraded the power supply and all is well.  removed ps works great in a different computer with less power demands

Modern computers are very complex and there a many available options.

 

I was assuming a correctly configured computer that had been running correctly before.

 

Modern graphics hardware (Nvidia, AMD, Intel), typically, contains two different sets of video control electronics (in the same hardware). One is usually VESA (video electronics standards association -- vesa.org) compliant or based on a well know, older graphics system (I will refer to the as "low performance" graphics) . The other is a proprietary "high performance" graphics system.

 

When you install an operating system, or the computer is booting, it uses the "low performance" graphics to display information on your monitor. Once everything is running it may load the driver for the high performance graphics system. The "low performance" system uses a lot less power than the "high performance" system.

 

Your computers can work fine with the lower performance graphics system and maybe able to play games, with significant diminished performance .

 

I'm guessing, on your system the "high performance" system determined that there wasn't enough available power to run in "high performance" mode, so it left the "low performance" graphics active. It is possible that it only used part of the "high performance" system, or slowed the clock in order to use less power (although I have never heard of this)

 

1) The first case, the power supply section connected to your graphics hardware could have been dropping out when your system tried to use the "high performance" graphics system, and then the "high performance" graphics system detected a low supply voltage and when back to "low performance" graphics. Though I thick this is less likely as most power supply's will shutdown if this occurs.

 

2) The second case is were the computer tries to use the "high performance" graphics system and the load on the supply causes the voltage to dip just enough for "high performance" graphics system to think there is a low voltage condition and it automatically goes back to the "low performance" graphics system.

 

I have actual seen both. But with the first case the whole system shut down. With the second case there was a momentary blanking of the screen and then it would continue, but running much slower. Newer system may make the transition smother and they may not be a blanking of the screen.

 

Also, the power supply outputs may start to sag over time and heat causing the second case to occur more often.

 

There are also possibility for a combination of all these factors. There are so many options for CPU's, Power Supply''s, Motherboards, graphics ..... etc.

 

It real comes down to debugging the most common failures first and them move to the less common ones. Hard-drives is a good starting point (non SSD's). It a mechanical device, and "usual" fails before the electronics.

 

I hope this help.

 

 

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1 hour ago, reallybigken said:

Modern computers are very complex and there a many available options.

 

I was assuming a correctly configured computer that had been running correctly before.

 

Modern graphics hardware (Nvidia, AMD, Intel), typically, contains two different sets of video control electronics (in the same hardware). One is usually VESA (video electronics standards association -- vesa.org) compliant or based on a well know, older graphics system (I will refer to the as "low performance" graphics) . The other is a proprietary "high performance" graphics system.

 

When you install an operating system, or the computer is booting, it uses the "low performance" graphics to display information on your monitor. Once everything is running it may load the driver for the high performance graphics system. The "low performance" system uses a lot less power than the "high performance" system.

 

Your computers can work fine with the lower performance graphics system and maybe able to play games, with significant diminished performance .

 

I'm guessing, on your system the "high performance" system determined that there wasn't enough available power to run in "high performance" mode, so it left the "low performance" graphics active. It is possible that it only used part of the "high performance" system, or slowed the clock in order to use less power (although I have never heard of this)

 

1) The first case, the power supply section connected to your graphics hardware could have been dropping out when your system tried to use the "high performance" graphics system, and then the "high performance" graphics system detected a low supply voltage and when back to "low performance" graphics. Though I thick this is less likely as most power supply's will shutdown if this occurs.

 

2) The second case is were the computer tries to use the "high performance" graphics system and the load on the supply causes the voltage to dip just enough for "high performance" graphics system to think there is a low voltage condition and it automatically goes back to the "low performance" graphics system.

 

I have actual seen both. But with the first case the whole system shut down. With the second case there was a momentary blanking of the screen and then it would continue, but running much slower. Newer system may make the transition smother and they may not be a blanking of the screen.

 

Also, the power supply outputs may start to sag over time and heat causing the second case to occur more often.

 

There are also possibility for a combination of all these factors. There are so many options for CPU's, Power Supply''s, Motherboards, graphics ..... etc.

 

It real comes down to debugging the most common failures first and them move to the less common ones. Hard-drives is a good starting point (non SSD's). It a mechanical device, and "usual" fails before the electronics.

 

I hope this help.

 

 

 

how about just adding up the total wattage for powered components and selecting an appropriate power supply?  i'd likely go a bit higher though for a margin of safety or should higher wattage components be added in future. the premium brand modular power supplies usually do fine without needing to choose 1 step higher wattage

Edited by atyclb

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