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dreamweaver

What Does นะ "na" Mean?

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Thanks for the above explanations.

After a 3 month visit recently, I was really wondering on the translation of "krap" (sounding more like "kup") as I noticed more than in the past this word being spoken by males, particularly on television, often several times in only a few sentences.

Are they really adding emphasis to being polite or is this creeping more so into Thai language, just as the word "LIKE" seems to have become part of the English language to be used excessively by younger American and Australian people?

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Hi,

When i emailed my Thai friend to tell her i'm coming, she said "I'll plan for us na"..."See you soon na"

What does "na" means in Thai?

The general meaning is a lot like "is that ok?", or "is that correct?" or even "do you agree?", usually expecting an affirmative response to validate what the individual was saying.

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Thanks for the above explanations.

After a 3 month visit recently, I was really wondering on the translation of "krap" (sounding more like "kup") as I noticed more than in the past this word being spoken by males, particularly on television, often several times in only a few sentences.

Are they really adding emphasis to being polite or is this creeping more so into Thai language, just as the word "LIKE" seems to have become part of the English language to be used excessively by younger American and Australian people?

[/quote

It's definitely not a fashion. it's an established social manner that's always there for formal situations like being on television. :-)

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Thanks for the above explanations.

After a 3 month visit recently, I was really wondering on the translation of "krap" (sounding more like "kup") as I noticed more than in the past this word being spoken by males, particularly on television, often several times in only a few sentences.

Are they really adding emphasis to being polite or is this creeping more so into Thai language, just as the word "LIKE" seems to have become part of the English language to be used excessively by younger American and Australian people?

krup or kup either way is pronounced by males. this is more of an acknowledgement to something.

2 examples but there's a billion more:

-someone tells you to go somewhere, you acknowledge by saying "krup"

-someone asks something, "are you traveling?" you answer "chai krup" or just "krup" - meaning yes or you can just say kup

additionally like patri said, this isn't something that is "new" it's been around forever. but back in the days it was "krup kra pom" or "korrup pom" but you also still hear people saying "krup pom" to sound more sincere and politer.

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I would agree it is more often used by females, but far from exclusively. From my observation, males rarely use it when asking for agreement, typically only to make a statement softer (i.e. when wishing the gf goodnight 'fan dii, na' or sweet dreams). Not commanding, but suggesting. My two cents...

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Guys, krap is used by men and kah is used by women. It has no equivalent in English and is not a 'tie down' like 'is that right?' like some have suggested.

It is almost identical in meaning to 'desu' in Japanese, it is just added at the end of a sentence to symobolically note politeness. But similar also to 'Hai' in Japanese it is used to confirm that a statement is true. This is different to 'yes' in English (same with Hai), it translates more correctly to 'that's correct'

e.g. English - did you go swimming today? - answer 'yes'

English - oh you didn't go swimming today - 'answert 'no'

Thai/Japanese did you go swimming today? - answer 'kap/Hai'

Thai/Japanese oh you didn't go swimming today - answer 'kap/Hai'

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I don't know, but I was taught "na" had two different meanings, depending on tone. นะ is to soften a statement, whereas น่ะ is used more to command something. For example:

นะ = "We will goto this place, ok?"

น่ะ = "We WILL go to this place!"

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just to add, up in Chiang Rai, they use 'na' but when it's the 'question' version of it,as in something like 'bpai duay gan na?' the 'na' will be replaced by 'noh?'

I'm not sure if this is heard in other parts of the country?

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'noh' is more likely to be used in suggestion for an agreement. For example, today weather is good, don't you think so? Wan nee agaat dee, noh?

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how is it that น่ะ can be mid or falling tone?

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The English use 'you know'? a lot or 'right?' at the end of sentences to similar effect. The Welsh traditionally used 'is it?'. The Scots 'reet?' (right)

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'noh' is more likely to be used in suggestion for an agreement. For example, today weather is good, don't you think so? Wan nee agaat dee, noh?

Yes, that was my understanding too as in ...'we're coming too, right?' but is it a 'northern thing'? or is it heard all over? (I've not had that much exposure to Thai in the rest of the country :) )

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The English use 'you know'? a lot or 'right?' at the end of sentences to similar effect. The Welsh traditionally used 'is it?'. The Scots 'reet?' (right)

And forgot - the other traditional English na was to put 'what?' at the end of a sentence. Not used in this generation except by absurd toffs or mickey takers

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BANGKOK 22 November 2017 00:24
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