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San_Belgium

Continuing Study In Thailand

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^I concur with Ken, above, both on the issue of greater need for EP science teachers AND his positive opinion of Ajarn's character!!!

:o

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It's not often you find someone willing to research an alternative viewpoint.....

My plan was to research it to reinforce my position, not yours! :o

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Richb

I have a friend doing a degree at home with the OU. But, he says its a real bugger to handle the job and the studying. You also need to watch out as some of the courses have residential periods as part of the course. Just check out the OU web site. After graduating, their degree will be as valid as any other uni over here.

To back up Ken, I know a few people that have maths/science degrees and they do tend to get offered more money than "mere" english teachers. But then, that is the situation now. What it will be like in a few years time, who knows? Even so, I would suggest the science degree rather than a general english/business degree if its your intention to teach.

Now, remember the 3 years completion is if you study equivalent to a full time student! If you are planning that with a full time job, I really wish you good luck. A more realistic timescale might be 5-6 years.

Where was your home in the UK? England, Scotland? Have you considered instead of going for the full thing in one go, to go down the Higher National Certificate, Higher National Diploma, Degree route? This way you get a piece of paper after completing each section and you end up with a degree at the end. It means if for whatever reason you decide to drop out you will ( could) have something to show to employers etc ie a HNC rather than just some credits in an uncompleted course.

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Okay, because of your insistence that things are different now (and with the credible anecdotal evidence you presented), I cruised through some ajarn.com ads and I believe now you are right. There is more of a demand now for science and math teachers than in years past. A few in tutorial centers, a few in Thai govt schools. Of course, these were all for teaching kids. If you like 'em, great.

Still in the extreme minority when compared to the need for English teachers, but clearly more of a need than I'd seen before.... I stand corrected.  I still believe that focusing on English teaching skills will be of most value, but the Science/Math background clearly is now value-added.

http://www.ajarn.com/Jobs/jobs_offered.php#1003764

Hey, even Olde Dinosaurs can learn new tricks  :D

:(:D:)

Thank you Ken for sticking up for me on this one, until you got the old buzzard (joking only Teacher).

Hope you all Kan Win in your lives. -_-

Happy Days :wub:

:o:D:D

Kan Win

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Thank you Ken for sticking up

for me on this one, until

you got the old buzzard (joking only Teacher).McWai.jpg

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Thanks for the help everyone.

Glad that the disagreement was sorted out without to much upset. :o

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I think NIDA might also be a good choice for you to consider. I have several friends studying there. It has been ranked by Asia Inc. as the top 6 MBA in Asean. It is the only Thai institute selected by Michael E. Porter to offer his course on Microeconomics of Competitiveness (also teaching at Harvard). As far as I know, its English program is accepting application until the end of September. Maybe you want to check that out NIDA MBA Program

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Bangkok University's MBA is quite easy. My bf took some classes in the MBA program of Bangkok Uni. I also took some classes in the Undergrad level. I would say that this uni needs a lot of improvement when it comes to course content, level of students and teachers and the standard of teaching.

Now, I am taking some business classes in Assumption (ABAC) University Graduate School. The classes are pretty intensive with a lot of group work. But the school's system is not quite different from Bangkok Uni.

However, both schools are okay and recognized if you're just going stay here in Thailand.

I heard Sasin has the best MBA program in Thailand, but don't know much about it.

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I'll also be using my GI Bill for my MAsters in Thailand. BKK Uni will do the paperwork for u. I also took the tour, nice campus....sexy students (not as sexy as Chula girls but will do). But for the easiest and cheapest route...try Ramkamphang (sp). U dont even have to attend the classes if you don't want to as long as you pass the test. The school is designed for working, busy adults. Those are my 2 main choices due to the price and lack of difficulty. I already have a BA from the U.S and to me (hate to say this) but most education in schools is a waste of money.

Most Uni Masters program will be around 25000-40000 baht per semester. Since you'll be getting about $985 per month in GI Bill benefit.....u can pocket a lot of money or just use the money to treat all your cute classmates to dinner and a trip to Phuket once in awhile. Also, once signed up for a program you qualify for a 1 year student visa (which I don't need because I have a Thai ID card/passport also).

Maybe we'll end up in the same class. Just look for the guy not overly concern with his grades :o

Ski....

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The tops for MBA international programs is probably Chula's Sasin, which is jointly supported by Northwestern and U of Pennsylvania. It is very well established -- maybe twenty years now -- and has a high reputation in Thailand. I know of at least one large multi-national company which sends it's people there to groom them for higher management positions.

Good luck! :o

Sasin

I have an MBA. I wholeheardedly agree that Sasin is the best place in Muang Thai for an MBA or MM. The Kellog influence is a great help too.

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I have my MBA from Sasin. The professors are excellent. But the students are inexperienced and very young. Often their only experience is a year or two in daddy's business. Most of what the professors said went over their heads. And the group work is tortuous. I didn't hand in any paper that I was proud of over the two years. At the end, I just wanted to finish and get out of there.

The courses run for five weeks each, so the professors can go back to the US or Europe. Usually you take two courses at a time. Cheating is rampant. I even saw that they stole the Hard Rock Cafe logo to advertise their Halloween party (not sure if its this year's or last's - I saw someone at the gym wearing the T-shirt). We took exams in special rooms where the desks were all spread out.

After listening to days and days of marketing presentations once, myself and another foreigner asked the professor if ANY group had followed the instructions. He said no. So why were they all getting A's and B's? because "I want to get invited back next year"

In the end, it is up to you, how much you get out of it. I have not used my MBA much. I've been teaching, although I did help run the last school I worked at.

But at least your diploma will have the Kellogg and Wharton names on it.

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I completed the MM program at Sasin many moons ago (on the GI Bill), so I cannot address all the comments on the MBA program. However I do recall the professors complaining about the lack of experience on the part of the MBA students. The MM program is a different ballgame, in that the students are either entrepreneurs who have developed (or inherited) thriving businesses, or are sponsored by banks and other major companies and state enterprises. I believe there is still a requirement for 7 years working experience and a bachelor's degree or the equivalent to attend the MM program (the bachelors degree can be in any subject). If you are in your 30's or older this is a better program. A lot of work, but if you intend to live here, then the networking can be very beneficial to your own future, if you are prepared to cooperate and participate. It was to mine.

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I am of the understanding Assumption University offer a Graduate Diploma in Teaching can anyone offer any comment on, content worth, credibility outside Thailand but in near by countries etc?

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Search for a detailed answer to your question on ajarn.com. Wait, that idea will not work anymore.

In response to your question, the Ozzies will accept the course as will various American states. Other countries, I do not know.

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It's hard to say WHAT the "real" schools here want- if you're hinting at what International Schools really want, you're asking about a moving target. I think what they really want is for people who live here at the time of application not to apply, no matter how qualified we are. I have yet to hear a simple answer about what the International Schools here want, aside from the "have a degree in education and experience teaching in your home country." In that regard, I don't think any educational degree or experience from any institution outside your home country will be helpful at all, no matter what its quality level is.

If you're asking about its credibility in terms of general acceptability as a degree, I'd guess that it would be quite acceptable in any nearby country. Home countries would look at it with a certain amount of suspicion from unfamiliarity, just as Thailand has to be careful about vetting the degrees we have. It does seem that people who really want to do so can do real coursework at Assumption, even if it's not really required [from what friends of mine who work there say] for most students to do anything else but show up. I've known folks who studied there who did say their educational programs were challenging.

It's also important to find out what you mean by "credible" and for what purpose. A Graduate Diploma in Teaching might be very well, but if the school you want to work at ONLY wants someone with an M.Ed., that wouldn't be very helpful, then, would it? So make sure you know what the place you'd like to go to wants, and then shoot for those credentials, wherever you study.

"Steven"

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BANGKOK 26 July 2017 23:30
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