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Govt Says Tap Water Is Now Safe To Drink

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So, is it still safe to drink or not, considering that in most apartments, the govt water is first stored in an overhead tank?

:o

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Govt Says Tap Water Is Now Safe To Drink,

water passed by the prime minister ???? well i wouldnt drink it.

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Actually, it's been a few months already since I saw the ad on TV about that.

I've always wondered if it'd be just as safe considering that my tap water passes through my apartment building's overhead tank.... :o

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So, is it still safe to drink or not, considering that in most apartments, the govt water is first stored in an overhead tank?

:o

NO WAY Not Safe, don't you believe this! :D

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Bangkok tap water is normally safe to drink - in fact it consistently tested better than bottled water even 25 years ago. But there is always the chance of contamination so even now most people will filter in some way. Holding tanks are normal everywhere (but they may be much larger water towers to many of us).

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How does the water supplier qualify the statement "...is safe to drink?" Was the water tested at random locations (from consumers taps) throughout Bangkok? Or was it tested at the exit point of the water treatment plant?

What about "backflow prevention"? Does it exist in Thailand? I've mentioned this several times before on TV & nobody seems to think anything of it. In actual fact, this is particularly important in Thailand due to the low pressure water supply system used here.

A short story...

About 15 years ago (or so), over 100 people were admitted to hospitals in Sydney (Australia) & treated for poisoning. This was as a result of a sudden reduced water supply pressure. The pressure reduction allowed "contaminants" to be sucked into the water supply line. When the normal pressure returned, people drank the water & then got sick.

Below are some weblinks about "backflow prevention".

http://www.sydneywater.com.au/BuildingDeve...kflowOccurs.cfm

http://www.sydneywater.com.au/BuildingDeve...entBackflow.cfm

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It is a dangerous statement for the government to make and an even more dangerous one to believe. A lot of buildings, especially small guest houses in tourist areas are not on mains water. They rely on water trucked in daily and who checks the source of that water? So the tourist arriving in Thailand is told the water is safe, meaning the mains water but how is he/she to know the source of the stuff in their bathroom?

Even where a place is on mains water, as has been said, the water is usually stored in a break tank on the roof. This is similar to the UK where the only tap allowed to take water direct from the mains is the kitchen cold water tap. In the UK it is well known that you should only drink the water out of this tap and not others where the water has been stored in the break tank.

I am afraid that, knowing the wackiness of Thai government employees and the (face saving) statements they make, I will continue to drink only bottled water in Thailand and advise others to do the same. Probably okay if you are out in the sticks drinking well water but in large towns and cities I'm not taking the chance.

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It is a dangerous statement for the government to make and an even more dangerous one to believe. A lot of buildings, especially small guest houses in tourist areas are not on mains water. They rely on water trucked in daily and who checks the source of that water? So the tourist arriving in Thailand is told the water is safe, meaning the mains water but how is he/she to know the source of the stuff in their bathroom?

Even where a place is on mains water, as has been said, the water is usually stored in a break tank on the roof. This is similar to the UK where the only tap allowed to take water direct from the mains is the kitchen cold water tap. In the UK it is well known that you should only drink the water out of this tap and not others where the water has been stored in the break tank.

I am afraid that, knowing the wackiness of Thai government employees and the (face saving) statements they make, I will continue to drink only bottled water in Thailand and advise others to do the same. Probably okay if you are out in the sticks drinking well water but in large towns and cities I'm not taking the chance.

You wouldn't catch me drinking "well water" in Thailand. I'd sooner take my chances with tap water. Can you imagine the "quality workmanship" & "attention to detail" that is used when installing the sewer piework in Thailand? I wonder if anybody has ever thought about how a leaking sewer pipe can affect the water table?

Another short story...

Some years ago, I used to work for a Waste Water Treatment company in Australia. This company made domestic & commercial waste water treatment systems. As part of the company marketing strategy, a couple of geomorphologists (from a Sydney University) were contracted to do a study upon the "run off" water & "tap water" in an area west of Sydney (called Picton). Picton did not have a sewer system at that time. The "run off" water was deemed as being;

a. storm water in underground drains.

b. natural & man-made water collection points (dams & the like).

The 1 year study required the placement of a multitude of data collecting devices. These devices sampled water at various locations (see a. & b. above) throughout the town, on a weekly basis. The tap water was sampled once per month but from many different homes.

After 1 year, the results were collated & it was decided that further study was necessary bacause of unacceptably high levels of Ecoli bacteria found in the collection areas & in the tap water. The further study was to find out where this bacteria came from.

The results showed that the Ecoli bacteria came from the septic systems (the old & outdated anerobic type) of homes. The bacteria appeared in the "run off" water due to water table events. It appeared in the tap water also because of the water table & also because that some areas had a faulty water supply pipework system (it leaked). Had the water supply system been a low pressure type, similar to that used in Thailand, the results would have been a lot worse.

If you have a well & a septic system, you may like to think again.

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Most water supplies have residual chlorine to try and kill off bacteria that may enter the system after the treatment plant. I was once told that it should be enough to protect against problems as long as there are several water changes per day. If the water tanks are designed to give you a full day of ride-through in loss of city water then you should have some supplemental treatment.

Interesting comment on the backflow preventers as well; a backflow preventer is basically two check-valves in series. While many of the water pumps are provided with single check valves, normal practice in the US is to ensure that you have a backflow preventer at the incoming meter-- this ensures integrity of the water supply. Additional ones are placed anywhere the water becomes industrial/non-potable supply, such as make-up water intakes for chilled water systems, to ensure that these systems don't contaminate the domestic (potable) water supply.

UV treatment of water for drinking at point of use should be pretty safe where the government insists the water is drinkable.

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Have you checked for dead birds, rats etc in the roof tank? :o

We keep the steel lid on our tank and wash out the sediment, once a year.

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Have you checked for dead birds, rats etc in the roof tank? :o

Exactly. I once lived in an apartment block (here in Thailand) where it was the responsibility of the residents to go roof-side to clean out our own water tank about once a year. The disgusting things (dead and alive) we found in it! :D

After that, I wouldn't even use the tap water to wash the dishes. Unfortunately, showering with it was a necessity but absolutely disgusting. Bits and pieces of god-knows-what kept plugging up the shower head.

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As someone who used to manage high rise condos in Bangkok, I urge you all NOT to drink the tap water in your condo.

A certain condominium development I know, but can not mention, had the soilwaste pipe run over the top of the underground water storage tank.

The tank for the soil waste was right next to the tap water tank. Sharing the same wall. Now before my time the sealant was not checked and cracks had developed, which allowed the soiled water to seap right through the wall and into the tap water tank. This resulted in many residents in hospital from drinking the tap water. Thankfully everyone recovered. (Even more thankfully this occurred before my tenure!)

In any event, don't risk it, I saw the paper records of the water tests, and I will NEVER drink tap water in Thailand, EVER!

Filter systems are inexpensive, easy to fit and work. Buy one.

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As someone who used to manage high rise condos in Bangkok, I urge you all NOT to drink the tap water in your condo.

A certain condominium development I know, but can not mention, had the soilwaste pipe run over the top of the underground water storage tank.

The tank for the soil waste was right next to the tap water tank. Sharing the same wall. Now before my time the sealant was not checked and cracks had developed, which allowed the soiled water to seap right through the wall and into the tap water tank. This resulted in many residents in hospital from drinking the tap water. Thankfully everyone recovered. (Even more thankfully this occurred before my tenure!)

In any event, don't risk it, I saw the paper records of the water tests, and I will NEVER drink tap water in Thailand, EVER!

Filter systems are inexpensive, easy to fit and work. Buy one.

Thanks for the advice.

However, I wonder which filter system is "good enough"?

Are those cheap ones in Tesco okay?

Or, would something as simple as a Brita "pitcher type" water filter be okay?

http://www.fridgefilters.com/brita-classic...on-pitcher.html

I live alone so I need to compare if it's cheaper to buy my own water filter or to get it from the coin operated Reverse Osmosis machine down the soi... :o

post-34215-1209823117_thumb.jpg

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I still use tap water for cooking, if I'm going to boil the water more than 5 minutes or so. Am I "in the clear" when doing that? Or are there still critters that can survive the "boil?"

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In general the tap water in Bangkok is excellent. Now mind you I live in a house so I can control the state of my storgae tank.

AT MY HOUSE the water is safe to drink but I don't because the cholramine makes it taste funny. Ditto ice. I do use tap water in my coffee maker with no side effects (filter/drip).

I bought one of those 3 stage stainless steel jobbies with stage 3 being a ceramic filter. Excellent value for money.

To the gentleman above - you should use the rev osmosis machine in your building.

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BANGKOK 25 September 2018 23:47
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