Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Sunburn

Mate / Buddy

Recommended Posts

Is there a word in Thai similar to the British 'mate' or American 'buddy'? T rak seems to be used only by close female friends and seems inappropriate for 2 men for example. Is there different words for aquaintances/close friends/friends of opposite sex? Sorry if I'm asking a really obvious one, but I'm just starting to learn Thai and have not come across anything similar yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using the prefix 'Ai' before your mates name shows familiarity and freindship. Be warned though. Only use this to close friends as it can have derogotory meanings as well.

'Pee' and 'Nong' are more terms of endearment or respect but can also be used in a friendship context.

'Tee Rak' means 'Darling' and should only be used to your significant other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope, there is no exact equivalent.

If you used the Thai word for "friend" as much as some Brits, Americans and Aussies tend to use "buddy", "mate", "old chap" etc., you'd be considered to have a minor case of bats in the belfry.

"Pee" (older sibling) is a normal word of address that signals a willingness to not be distant but should be used only for people who could be your older sibling. In some cases though, a technically younger person will be called "pee" if he/she has a significant amount more of power than the speaker. This is nothing to emulate though.

"Nong" is then the word that the other person would use to refer to you, the younger party... if they consider it appropriate. Unless your Thai is already quite advanced, Thais will probably feel more comfortable using "khun" with you. It is a more formal pronoun for "you".

Go with "khun" for you and "phom" for "I" (male) when in doubt. They are sufficiently polite for most situations but the most formal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Using the prefix 'Ai' before your mates name shows familiarity and freindship. Be warned though. Only use this to close friends as it can have derogotory meanings as well.

'Pee' and 'Nong' are more terms of endearment or respect but can also be used in a friendship context.

'Tee Rak' means 'Darling' and should only be used to your significant other.

You are right about the "ai" prefix, but a BIG caveat for people who have not heard it in context and understand how it should be used.

If you use "ai" before your taxi drivers name when referring to him, directly or indirectly , or the bartender or whatever, they would most likely find it highly offensive (some *might* laugh as well, but it is still not worth risking being offensive).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thai is sort of like English in that the closer you are to your friends, the more colorful your vocabulary can be. The words "mueng" (you) and "goo" (me) are very rude when used with most people, but are considered appropriate with your buddies.

Your best friends/buddies can be called "puen see" เพื่อนซี้ (or just "see") or more formally "puen sanit" เพื่อนสนิท and "puen ruk" เพื่อนรัก. "Gler" เกลอ is also a close friend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Isaan you can add the word "Bok" to prefix the name.

ie "Bok (insert name)" , it's a term for friends or familiarity similar to "Ai/Ee"

Again like "Mung" and "Goo" should only be used with good mates or family members.

:o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Pee" (older sibling) is a normal word of address that signals a willingness to not be distant but should be used only for people who could be your older sibling.

Not in my experience. 'Pii' is the most common word I hear used to refer to anyone older or of higher status.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Pee" (older sibling) is a normal word of address that signals a willingness to not be distant but should be used only for people who could be your older sibling.

Not in my experience. 'Pii' is the most common word I hear used to refer to anyone older or of higher status.

Aye.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Using the prefix 'Ai' before your mates name shows familiarity and freindship. Be warned though. Only use this to close friends as it can have derogotory meanings as well.

'Pee' and 'Nong' are more terms of endearment or respect but can also be used in a friendship context.

'Tee Rak' means 'Darling' and should only be used to your significant other.

You are right about the "ai" prefix, but a BIG caveat for people who have not heard it in context and understand how it should be used.

If you use "ai" before your taxi drivers name when referring to him, directly or indirectly , or the bartender or whatever, they would most likely find it highly offensive (some *might* laugh as well, but it is still not worth risking being offensive).

And of course, 'ee' before a female's name can be equally rude.

In the north, 'ah' before the man's (maybe women, too?) name is used as a sign of respect. 'Ah Hia' (mid tone for hia, not falling tone) is often used to refer to a Chinese man of perceived higher status...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is there a word in Thai similar to the British 'mate' or American 'buddy'?  T rak seems to be used only by close female friends and seems inappropriate for 2 men for example.  Is there different words for aquaintances/close friends/friends of opposite sex?  Sorry if I'm asking a really obvious one, but I'm just starting to learn Thai and have not come across anything similar yet.

Is there a word in Thai similar to the British 'mate' or American 'buddy'?
meadish_sweetball Posted Yesterday, 2004-11-11 17:04:34

  Nope, there is no exact equivalent.

Firefoxx Posted Yesterday, 2004-11-11 18:14:02

Your best friends/buddies can be called "puen see" เพื่อนซี้ (or just "see") or more formally "puen sanit" เพื่อนสนิท and "puen ruk" เพื่อนรัก. "Gler" เกลอ is also a close friend.

How about these four alternatives which haven't been mentioned yet... :o

1.มิตร "mit"

2.สหาย "sahai"

3.มิตรสหาย "mit sahai"

4.สหายสนิท "sahai sanit"

Cheers.

Snowleopard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

สหาย and มิตร aren't words that you would hear in normal everyday speech, at least not to refer to your "buddy". "Sahai" is formal and refers to a "companion" or "comrade", and is used pretty often in writing (novels and stories). "Mit" is more of a simple "friend", or rather "friendly", not necessarily close.

The one time you will see these words referring to close friends is in the phrase "เพื่อนสนิทมิตรสหาย" "puen sanit mit sahai", which means "all close friends and allies". "Mit sahai" is usually not used by itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
สหาย and มิตร aren't words that you would hear in normal everyday speech, at least not to refer to your "buddy".  "Sahai" is formal and refers to a "companion" or "comrade", and is used pretty often in writing (novels and stories).  "Mit" is more of a simple "friend", or rather "friendly", not necessarily close.

The one time you will see these words referring to close friends is in the phrase "เพื่อนสนิทมิตรสหาย" "puen sanit mit sahai", which means "all close friends and allies".  "Mit sahai" is usually not used by itself.

สหาย and มิตร aren't words that you would hear in normal everyday speech
The one time you will see these words

Maybe I've seen and heard more than you! :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, had a feeling it was a bit more complicated than English, which explains why I haven't come across a similar term yet. I'll stick with 'Tee rak ja' for the fiancee, & 'khun' for everyone else for now I think!

Thanks mate(s)! :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 19 July 2018 09:22
Sponsors
×