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BANGKOK 14 November 2018 09:25
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Richard W

Pesky-syllables

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and a near homonym for คำรวจ:

ดำรวจ (with ด rather than ต) = analyze, consider

Interestingly, the RID regards ดำรวจ as the regular derivative from ตรวจ; I would agree. For the Khmer origin of ตำรวจ it gives Khmer ฎํรวต, ตมฺรวต. In non-Indic words, Khmer corresponds to Thai and the mark above it here is nikkhahit (a.k.a. niggahita), the Thai vowel symbol a + nasal, which most courses on Thai omit simply because (with one pedantic exception - a decomposition of the graphic symbol of the vowel อึ) it isn't used in writing Thai. I don't know whether Khmer ตมฺรวต is simply an archaic spelling dating back to before Khmer writing distinguished what are now /t/ and /d/.

I had to look up the word แผลง to understand the RID entry. The relevant meaning I found was:

2. v. to convert (a word), e.g. ดำริ is converted from ตริ. :o

Interesting, so are you saying it was the Thais who added the /am/ infix, not the Khmer?

Edited by sabaijai

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and a near homonym for คำรวจ:

ดำรวจ (with ด rather than ต) = analyze, consider

Interesting, so are you saying it was the Thais who added the /am/ infix, not the Khmer?

I'm not saying that, but it has definitely been inserted in native Thai words. It's a very rare case of an infix being borrowed by a language, in this case Thai from Khmer. My only suggestion was that ตำรวจ might have a spelling-based pronunciation, as opposed to merely being an irregular form from Khmer.

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and a near homonym for คำรวจ:

ดำรวจ (with ด rather than ต) = analyze, consider

Interesting, so are you saying it was the Thais who added the /am/ infix, not the Khmer?

I'm not saying that, but it has definitely been inserted in native Thai words. It's a very rare case of an infix being borrowed by a language, in this case Thai from Khmer. My only suggestion was that ตำรวจ might have a spelling-based pronunciation, as opposed to merely being an irregular form from Khmer.

Makes sense, got it.

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The prefix ตำ "dtam" can be found in several words.Here are a few... :o

1.ตำนาน "dtam-naan"=a history;a chronicle;a legend;annals;records

2.ตำบล "dtam-bon"=district which is a subdivision of an "am-poe" (อำเภอ)

3.ตำรับ "dtam-rup"=prescription;recipe

4.ตำรา "dtam-raa"=a textbook

5.นอกตำรา "nok dtam-raa"=unorthodox

6.ตำหนัก "dtam-nak"=a building inside the palace

7.ตำหนิ "dtam-ni"=a flaw;a defect

8.ตำแหน่ง "dtam-naeng"= a position;a place

9.ตำลึง "dtam leung"= a unit of weight equal to 60 gram;an old unit of currency equal to 4 baht;also a plant (Coccinia indica;Coccinia Grandis)

(7) and (8) look like Thai derivatives including the -am- infix. ตำหนิ seems to be a derivative of ติ 'blame, fault'. ตำแหน่ง, more revealingly translated as 'position, post, rank', is probably a derivative of แต่ง 'adorn'.

As a unit of money or a weight, ตำลึง derives from Khmer ฎํฬึง, ตมฺลึง. The second vowel is the same in all three of these related words.

It would be nice to derive ตำรา from ตรา 'seal, stamp', but the semantics seems a bit too far-fetched.

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