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Smithson

Bamboo Variety Guadua Angustifolia

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Smithson,

I suggest placing a post in the Bamboo Identification Forum of bambooweb.info. There are bamboo experts (botanists and horticulturists) that might help you in identifying this interesting bamboo. Please, do supply in that Forum more photos, especially photos from those parts of the plant that are helpful/necessary for bamboo identification: a shoot having emerged from the ground, a one year old culm and a mature/old culm, a node of a culm showing the branches, an internode, a culm-sheath (outer side), foliage leaves, habit of the whole plant and approximate height and diameter of its tallest culms, and if the plant is found in cultivation or in the wild, and where. Further, please, supply in that Forum a short description of all the parts of the plant. What characters need to be described and in which way can easily perceived if you read any tropical bamboo species description (e.g. Bambusa vulgaris) from GrassBase, the Online World Grass Flora of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Yes, more info please. I want to use some in construction, inside use such as: rafters for a lightweight roof, stile, railing, some stuctural supports here and there, etc. Has anyone found the Guadua commercially in northern Thailand? Used it?

I have used some local stuff, don't know the name, for decorative purposes, seems to get those bugs that leave "sawdust" residue form the bamboo. Would another local variety do the job for my needs? What would be the local name, I know that can vary from area to area. I have been told that the best for furniture is the solid type from Burma, often painted black I believe.

I am trying to build as green as possible and have seen pictures of immense bamboo structures, so it may be possible here.

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The bamboo in the pics is called something like Mai pai baa, it grows wild around here specially near water,

Its a hollow bamboo, up to 7inch diameter and near 30mtr high, nice and straight.

Its normally sold by the metre and thin-stripped for tying rice bundles, in effect, a bit like wire without the corrosiveness, [dont need to knot it].

its possible to eat the new shoots at about 9in high, but be quick!

Cheers Lickey.

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I was told that plants of Bambusa lako were introduced into Malaysia and Thailand some time ago, but have no details and no proof. I am waiting for further news.

Meanwhile I got proof that Bambusa lako (Timor Black Bamboo) is available in Thailand. In Chiang Mai, I found three plant sellers at the Khamthiang Market offering potted plants of Bambusa lako as ไผ่ดำ (phai dam), big ones at 2,500 Baht, small ones at 400 Baht.

Last year, I bought "Bambusa lako" seeds offered via Internet. The seeds germinated and I got some seedlings, which are now big enough to identify this bamboo to be definitely not true Bambusa lako. Therefore, be careful when buying seeds from Internet sources.

I just get B. lako (seems to be) from JJ market

mrissara, you can check from the following two blogs, each with a bamboo photo set, if you received true Bambusa lako:

http://BamboosBaanSammiThailand.blogspot.com

Images: Bamboos at Baan Sammi

http://BamboosChiangMaiThailand.blogspot.com

Images: Bamboos in Chiang Mai, Bamboos at Khamthiang Market

The Thai name, ไผ่ดำ (phai dam) ["dam" means black], has been applied not only to Bambusa lako, but also to Phyllostachys nigra, and other species with black stems (culms) as well. For a first approach in identifying your plant, look at the internode. The internode is round in cross section in B. lako, whereas it is grooved or flattened in Phyllostachys. Further, foliage leaves of B. lako are larger than those of P. nigra.

Has anyone found the Guadua commercially in northern Thailand?

IraqRon, I have not seen any Guadua species grown in northern Thailand. The introduced plant, Guadua angustifolia var. bicolor from Colombia (mentioned in a previous post) is an ornamental variety, suitable for a large garden, and is unlikely to be planted commercially in Thailand. However, I got records that the wild form of Guadua angustifolia, which is one of the most commercially important bamboo species in northern South America, has recently been introduced to Central Thailand.

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I just get B. lako (seems to be) from JJ market

mrissara, you can check from the following two blogs, each with a bamboo photo set, if you received true Bambusa lako:

The Thai name, ไผ่ดำ (phai dam) ["dam" means black], has been applied not only to Bambusa lako, but also to Phyllostachys nigra, and other species with black stems (culms) as well. For a first approach in identifying your plant, look at the internode. The internode is round in cross section in B. lako, whereas it is grooved or flattened in Phyllostachys. Further, foliage leaves of B. lako are larger than those of P. nigra.

I, indeed, looking for a P. nigra which will run :o , but there was no such bamboo in that day.

They have only the one with round culm, absent of tessellate venation. So I assumed that the culm 's B. lako. So, I bought it as a substitute :D .

Is P. nigra available at KumTiang market or DoiSaKet nursery?

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The bamboo in the pics is called something like Mai pai baa, it grows wild around here specially near water,

Its a hollow bamboo, up to 7inch diameter and near 30mtr high, nice and straight.

Its normally sold by the metre and thin-stripped for tying rice bundles, in effect, a bit like wire without the corrosiveness, [dont need to knot it].

its possible to eat the new shoots at about 9in high, but be quick!

Cheers Lickey.

Lickey, I believe this variety is Bambusa Bluemena or Pai Sisuk. We have two large stands of this. It grows very fast and is sometimes used for construction, although the culm walls are a bit thin.

The favored material for construction is Pai Tong (D. Asper), from what I've read it's second only to Guadua. Building with bamboo is possible, however it's important to make sure it's the right variety, is harvested at the right time of year and is between 3-5 years old. It should also be preserved, the most effective and environmentally safe method uses borax.

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However, I got records that the wild form of Guadua angustifolia, which is one of the most commercially important bamboo species in northern South America, has recently been introduced to Central Thailand.

This is very interesting, if you have any more info pls post. I was reading your blog, the bamboo I have growing looks very similar to phai khao lam, however the locals call it lum a lok and nobody has mentioned it's use for khoa lam. Also, the walls are quite thick.

I have another mystery bamboo, the Thais refer to it as Pai Ratchini, I've seen it in Nakhon Nayok, apparently it was brought there from Prachinburi by HM (which would explain it's name). It's quite beautiful and covered in a white dust which gives it a gray appearance. Has anyone seen this before?

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Edited by Smithson

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I have another mystery bamboo, the Thais refer to it as Pai Ratchini, I've seen it in Nakhon Nayok, apparently it was brought there from Prachinburi by HM (which would explain it's name). It's quite beautiful and covered in a white dust which gives it a gray appearance. Has anyone seen this before?

That could be Dendrocalamus membranaceus or "Pai Sang Nuan"

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I have another mystery bamboo, the Thais refer to it as Pai Ratchini, I've seen it in Nakhon Nayok, apparently it was brought there from Prachinburi by HM (which would explain it's name). It's quite beautiful and covered in a white dust which gives it a gray appearance. Has anyone seen this before?

That could be Dendrocalamus membranaceus or "Pai Sang Nuan"

It looks similar, but the Sang Nuan doesn't have the white dust.

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I have another mystery bamboo, the Thais refer to it as Pai Ratchini, I've seen it in Nakhon Nayok, apparently it was brought there from Prachinburi by HM (which would explain it's name). It's quite beautiful and covered in a white dust which gives it a gray appearance. Has anyone seen this before?

That could be Dendrocalamus membranaceus or "Pai Sang Nuan"

It looks similar, but the Sang Nuan doesn't have the white dust.

Could it be Dendrocalamus sericeus "Pai Sang Hmon"? I heard it has kind of dust.

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Is P. nigra available at KumTiang market or DoiSaKet nursery?

mrissara, please, enter the post "Bamboos at Khamthiang Market, Chiang Mai" of the blog "Bamboos in Chiang Mai, Thailand", to see what bamboos are currently available on this market. As for Phyllostachys nigra f. nigra, the black-stem variety, has not seen in October 2008, whereas another variety, P. nigra f. boryana, has been available for sale. A photo of f. boryana can be seen in the photo album of that post, "Bamboos at Khamthiang Market", and in the photo album "Bamboos at Baan Sammi". The distinguishing character of f. boryana is an internode with a marble-like pattern: originally green, the stem develops dark-purplish or blackish cloudy blotches, but not into uniform black color. This variety will be propagated at Baan Sammi, which is not a plant nursery but a private resort. Its garden (4 rai) comprises several bamboos, which can be made available (in small or large quantity or size) for anybody on a non-commercial basis, e.g. plant exchange, or guests can obtain plants for free.

the locals call it lum a lok

Smithson, based on the local name "lum a lok" you provided for this bamboo, I rather suppose it is ไผ่ลำมะลอก (phai lam malok), the common name from central Thailand for Dendrocalamus longispathus, a thick-walled bamboo. There are other local names for this bamboo, too. Please check if the description from Kew matches with your plant.

Could it be Dendrocalamus sericeus "Pai Sang Hmon"? I heard it has kind of dust.

Locals of Chiang Mai consider ไผ่ซางหม่น (phai sang mon) as a synonym of ไผ่ซางราชินี (phai sang rachini), which means it should be the same species, Dendrocalamus sericeus.

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mrissara!

... have some Makinoi?

Phyllostachys makinoi was introduced by the Royal Project, Doi Ang Khang, mountainous northern part of Chiang Mai Province. Yesterday I saw plants offered at the Royal Project Fair, 13-16 Dec 2008, Chiang Mai, Convention Hall of the Chiang Mai University.

Google for: "bamboosthailand7.shutterfly.com" to see photos; there is also a link for text information.

Moso (P. pubescens) seeds arrived last week. Let me know if you are interested to grow some.

Moso Bamboo, Phyllostachys edulis, synonym P. pubescens, from China and Japan, was introduced by the Royal Project, too. I was told, this bamboo thrives well at Doi Ang Khang, and I saw a small plant at the Royal Project Bamboo Collection in Chiang Mai were it survived but does not thrive at all (perhaps due to the hotter climate and long pronounced dry season of the Chiang Mai plain). Also, it is said that propagules of this species often will need many years to get established and will then start growing well. So be patient with your Moso seedlings.

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Many thanks for such a good and bad news. I wish I could visit Doi AngKang soon, could be in Jan. I 'm looking for a Moso garden on my little land in the next 10 years. This is a looooong term project.

I have records of an ornamental variety, Guadua angustifolia var. bicolor from Colombia, that a single plant was given by a French biologist to Kasetsart University in Bangkok in 1989, and planted on their grounds. This variety is characterized by green stems with yellow stripes.

I went to Kasetsart U. last week. Only problem is I do not know the exact location for the Guadua angustifolia. I asked people at the herbarium (belong to ministry of agri and forest, located in the campus) but they do not heard of the boo. Would you mind to share more detail regarding to the record, such as faculty or person who was the recipient?

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Mrissara,

Here my sources of information on Guadua angustifolia var. bicolor, a variety of Guadua angustifolia with yellow stripes on its green stem:

"Introduced from Colombia into Switzerland and France in the late 1980's. One plant was given to the Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand, in 1989, and planted on its grounds" (The Bamboos of the World, by D. Ohrnberger, 1999, page 353. Published by Elsevier, ISBN 0-444-50020-0). Claude Rifat, a French plant collector and biologist, traveled through Southeast Asia and brought this plant, under the name Guadua angustifolia cv. Joseph de Jumonville, to the University ("cv." = cultivar = cultivated variety). As C. Rifat was rather a pharmacologist than a plant taxonomist, he might have had contacts with members of the Faculty of Pharmacy, or related faculties, and the plant could be on their grounds.

Claude Rifat published his variety of Guadua under the name as mentioned before in the Journal of Bamboo Research, volume 8 (no. 4), 1989: pages 37-39. This Journal is published in China; I read C. Rifat's contribution many years ago but do not own a copy.

Yesterday, I searched the Internet and got to know of C. Rifat's untimely death, so we can't ask him about his plant introduction.

Ximena Londoño (Instituto Vallecaucano de Investigaciones Científicas, Cali, Colombia, South America) published the same Guadua variety under the name Guadua angustifolia var. bicolor in the same year: "Una nueva variedad de Guadua angustifolia Kunth de Colombia" in Revista de la Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas, volume 17 (65), 1989, pages 379-381. This bamboo was introduced into the USA under this name, has become established and is now well-known in horticulture, and many links can be found if you google for "Guadua" + "angustifolia" + "bicolor". Hence, if anybody is interested in this yellow-striped Guadua variety, or in its wild, green-stem variety, it should be easiest obtainable from the USA or Colombia.

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Does anyone know where to find D. strictus? This is a solid bamboo which in Thai is called 'Pai Ton' (which unsurprisingly translates as 'solid bamboo').

I know it is available in Vietnam and is used to make furniture.

Thanks!

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