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farangajarn

International School Jobs - Qualifications?

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I am curious to know what people's experiences with international school teaching in Thailand has been. I teach at one in Chiang Mai and I find my job delightful. In the USA I literally left teaching due to the horrendous conditions and did other work. Moving here I did the usual teaching other kinds of schools and so know the debilitating conditions that can exist in many Thai schools..........admin nightmares, lack of work permits, low pay, huge classes. My last few years have been in direct constrast to that. I am 57 and have no age perception probelms at work. Small classes and interested students. What I consider to be pretty reasonable pay, vacations and benefits though some others, mostly directly here from western countries feel its not enough. It affords me a fairly comfortable lifestyle to the extent I have purchased a car and am buying a home strictly on local wages. I feel very fortunate. Of course there are probelms in any school and no job is heaven...........I mean thats why they pay us to do them..........but what are the experiences of others? I havent seen much in this forum on this topic and so am curious. THANKS>

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can anyone tell me the typical requirements for a job teaching at an international school in Thailand? I read elsewhere that a BEd is one of the main requirements at the very least?

Appreciate any replies

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I have always understood that the better (authentic) schools require a B.Ed, or a PGCE, or its equivalent, from the West, along with teaching practice and certification in the home country. There are exceptions, especially in the lower tier schools. Many of the fully accredited schools prefer to recruit overseas. Hey, we have such teachers here' I'll let them explain.

Welcome to the Teaching forum.

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Thanks, farang ajarn - I had you in mind when I answered the earlier post. Our other moderator can merge your answer with the original post.

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Will do regarding merger- would also like to advise, Ajarn, that no matter what anyone else on this forum or elsewhere may tell you, you CANNOT buy a home- not even a CONDO- on local wages legally, UNLESS you are a permanent resident or citizen. To buy a condo you still have to prove (and have the paperwork to prove it) that the money came from abroad, even if you sent the money abroad first and had it come back later. If you don't have this paperwork, your legal right to ownership- even of the CONDO- can be challenged successfully. Hope it's not too late for you to investigate this.

Regarding the main topic- what I've heard about the true blue internationals is that they pay quite well but take their pound of flesh (especially bureaucratic paperwork).

"S"

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Regarding qualifications, I believe most of the true-blue international schools require actual LICENSING in your home country. Educational academic degrees are only a piece of that puzzle. Furthermore, they like to see at least 1-2 years of experience teaching in your home country. It depends partly on what subject you teach and what their needs are.

"S"

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I am curious to know what people's experiences with international school teaching in Thailand has been. I teach at one in Chiang Mai and I find my job delightful. In the USA I literally left teaching due to the horrendous conditions and did other work. Moving here I did the usual teaching other kinds of schools and so know the debilitating conditions that can exist in many Thai schools..........admin nightmares, lack of work permits, low pay, huge classes. My last few years have been in direct constrast to that. I am 57 and have no age perception probelms at work. Small classes and interested students. What I consider to be pretty reasonable pay, vacations and benefits though some others, mostly directly here from western countries feel its not enough. It affords me a fairly comfortable lifestyle to the extent I have purchased a car and am buying a home strictly on local wages. I feel very fortunate. Of course there are probelms in any school and no job is heaven...........I mean thats why they pay us to do them..........but what are the experiences of others? I havent seen much in this forum on this topic and so am curious. THANKS>

I have also made the move to one of the top tier international schools and it is a whole different world. A very nice one and I echo most of what you have written. Students are attentive and interested in learning and seem to understand the importance of a good education. Salary and benefits also fall into the "whole different world" category and age is not a factor whatsoever. The only regret I have is that I did not do it sooner.

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For my qualifications I was a teacher in the USA, I have a BS.Ed. and an MSW along with a TEFL certificate. My international school would require appropriate paperwork and degrees for hiring. Teaching experience counts for a lot and there is some flexibility about degrees. We do get teacher licenses and work permits and B work visas along with paying Thai taxes. Some teachers are recruited from overseas at job fairs. I have seen very little prejudice about hiring local teachers if qualified etc etc. Pound of flesh on paperwork? All I can say is its nothing like the pounds of paperwork you have to produce in public government schools in the usa due to overlapping country, state and federal oversights and programs.

ps on the owning the house bit I hear what you are saying but its in my spouse's name with me owning the building and having a 30 year lease on the land (an infruc).

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My international school requires a degree (minimum BA, BSc or BEd) + national certification + a minimum of two years experience in a "real" school, i.e. not a language school. ESL teachers, in addition, are required to have an ESL qualification.

Basically, you need to have the qualifications which would allow you to teach in your home country. State Certification for the USA, PGCE for England, etc., etc.

G

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I am curious to know what people's experiences with international school teaching in Thailand has been. I teach at one in Chiang Mai and I find my job delightful. In the USA I literally left teaching due to the horrendous conditions and did other work. Moving here I did the usual teaching other kinds of schools and so know the debilitating conditions that can exist in many Thai schools..........admin nightmares, lack of work permits, low pay, huge classes. My last few years have been in direct constrast to that. I am 57 and have no age perception probelms at work. Small classes and interested students. What I consider to be pretty reasonable pay, vacations and benefits though some others, mostly directly here from western countries feel its not enough. It affords me a fairly comfortable lifestyle to the extent I have purchased a car and am buying a home strictly on local wages. I feel very fortunate. Of course there are probelms in any school and no job is heaven...........I mean thats why they pay us to do them..........but what are the experiences of others? I havent seen much in this forum on this topic and so am curious. THANKS>

I have also made the move to one of the top tier international schools and it is a whole different world. A very nice one and I echo most of what you have written. Students are attentive and interested in learning and seem to understand the importance of a good education. Salary and benefits also fall into the "whole different world" category and age is not a factor whatsoever. The only regret I have is that I did not do it sooner.

I would like to interview some of the top tier international schools in Thailand for my daughter to attend. Looking for an English language curriculum in science and math as well as a thai curriculum.... Chiang Mai, Hua Hin , or others would be viable however not interested in BKK or Pattaya.

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I am curious to know what people's experiences with international school teaching in Thailand has been. I teach at one in Chiang Mai and I find my job delightful. In the USA I literally left teaching due to the horrendous conditions and did other work. Moving here I did the usual teaching other kinds of schools and so know the debilitating conditions that can exist in many Thai schools..........admin nightmares, lack of work permits, low pay, huge classes. My last few years have been in direct constrast to that. I am 57 and have no age perception probelms at work. Small classes and interested students. What I consider to be pretty reasonable pay, vacations and benefits though some others, mostly directly here from western countries feel its not enough. It affords me a fairly comfortable lifestyle to the extent I have purchased a car and am buying a home strictly on local wages. I feel very fortunate. Of course there are probelms in any school and no job is heaven...........I mean thats why they pay us to do them..........but what are the experiences of others? I havent seen much in this forum on this topic and so am curious. THANKS>

I have also made the move to one of the top tier international schools and it is a whole different world. A very nice one and I echo most of what you have written. Students are attentive and interested in learning and seem to understand the importance of a good education. Salary and benefits also fall into the "whole different world" category and age is not a factor whatsoever. The only regret I have is that I did not do it sooner.

I would like to interview some of the top tier international schools in Thailand for my daughter to attend. Looking for an English language curriculum in science and math as well as a thai curriculum.... Chiang Mai, Hua Hin , or others would be

viable however not interested in BKK or Pattaya.

I also would like to know which schools are the top tier schools in Thailand and which are the best? I will relocate to the area once I decide on a school for my 3 kids. They are currently going to a bi-lingual ashool which is OK but all the other kids are Thai so their language skills are not developing adequitely. I know they are expensive.

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I am curious to know what people's experiences with international school teaching in Thailand has been. I teach at one in Chiang Mai and I find my job delightful. In the USA I literally left teaching due to the horrendous conditions and did other work. Moving here I did the usual teaching other kinds of schools and so know the debilitating conditions that can exist in many Thai schools..........admin nightmares, lack of work permits, low pay, huge classes. My last few years have been in direct constrast to that. I am 57 and have no age perception probelms at work. Small classes and interested students. What I consider to be pretty reasonable pay, vacations and benefits though some others, mostly directly here from western countries feel its not enough. It affords me a fairly comfortable lifestyle to the extent I have purchased a car and am buying a home strictly on local wages. I feel very fortunate. Of course there are probelms in any school and no job is heaven...........I mean thats why they pay us to do them..........but what are the experiences of others? I havent seen much in this forum on this topic and so am curious. THANKS>

I have also made the move to one of the top tier international schools and it is a whole different world. A very nice one and I echo most of what you have written. Students are attentive and interested in learning and seem to understand the importance of a good education. Salary and benefits also fall into the "whole different world" category and age is not a factor whatsoever. The only regret I have is that I did not do it sooner.

I would like to interview some of the top tier international schools in Thailand for my daughter to attend. Looking for an English language curriculum in science and math as well as a thai curriculum.... Chiang Mai, Hua Hin , or others would be

viable however not interested in BKK or Pattaya.

I also would like to know which schools are the top tier schools in Thailand and which are the best? I will relocate to the area once I decide on a school for my 3 kids. They are currently going to a bi-lingual ashool which is OK but all the other kids are Thai so their language skills are not developing adequitely. I know they are expensive.

Where are you living now?

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Correct me if I am wrong: the top tier international schools are so farang you seldom hear Thai spoken, in classrooms, playgrounds, or staffrooms. They try to imitate the very best secondary schools in the West. As such, they are fully accredited in the USA and/or the UK.

I went on a boat trip with the senior class from the best int'l school in Bangkok. No Thai language, just talked about getting into Stanford and Purdue, Oxford and Cambridge. Theyu mostly spoke English, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, German, etc.

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The true-blue international schools are probably OK, but we've had a number of teachers leave our bilingual school for international schools and none of them were happy. The wages were good, but the work load was enormous. We have 3 who have requested to come back as soon as we have an opening.

I don't know if that is a normal situation, and I am not implying that our school is fantastic, but at least the 2nd and 3rd tier schools have many problems with administration and with students.

Glad to hear your experience is good and your happy.

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To both parents of Thai or luk krueng children who have asked about the best international schools in Thailand, I might advise them to consider whether the children are ready for it. If the students have been in one of the best bilingual programs for several years, and know how to give essay type answers spontaneously by voice or by pen, they may be ready. If they are really fluent in English. If they know how to think for themselves and analyze problems critically. I knew a non-Thai, naive Asian 7th grade girl at Prem, who was being taught sex education. She had to answer open-ended questions about teen-age pregnancy, how to say know to sexual advances, how to report inappropriate sexual behavior, explain wet dreams, etc. Not the sort of questions your typical Thai student can answer. She had to read an article about Sumerian culture, and had to explain why the Nile overflowed in Egypt. She read Mark Twain books unabridged, etc.

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BANGKOK 23 July 2017 21:52
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