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Dying At Home In Chiang Mai

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gk10002000    2,846
On 5/29/2009 at 5:57 AM, caznshaz said:

This sort of post is very helpful - thank you very much and please accept my condolences.

yes, thank you for posting real world details. 

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MalandLee    151

Firstly I must echo Nancy's comments on the McKean Centre. Prices start at (around) 32,000 Baht per month. Of course everyone's  needs are different AND prices vary accordingly, BUT, if one is cognizant and able to express their wishes - many will know (Certainly my friend did), that remaining at home was an unacceptable burden on the person  who cared & loved the person.

 

We have a Thai friend in a "San Sai" palliative care centre - His family pay 34,000 Baht per month for his care. Being Thai and "local", they hunted for a cost effective solution to home care - hiring nurses 24/7 did not work for them.

 

Note, that in both cases - (Thai, Non Thai) drugs are not included in the prices quoted. MANY enterprising partners of terminally ill persons can "source" expensive drugs, from the families of recently deceased persons. I know from experience, it can save considerable sums of money. Whilst it may seem distasteful, to some doing this, it is often a "win - win" situation for the terminally ill person AND the partner of a deceased person - FINANCIALLY.

 

Other things happen after death and can be quite draining on the "bereaved" - but need to be done.

 

<SNIP>I had to go to immigration to cancel <deceased> visa. Speak to British Embassy to get <deceased> passport cancelled. Apparently these are urgent items to get sorted.

 

I am in the process of getting Thai & English death certificates certified. I went to City Hall this morning (Twice) for them to finish off the process. I go back Monday to collect the papers.

 

Yesterday I posted off <deceased> UK driving license to get that cancelled. There are a few things like that, that I still need to do - need to look at my list of actions. <END>

 

These last weeks have been draining saying our final goodbye's - If I am to go, whilst here in Thailand, I hope the McLean centre has room for me in my final days..

 

One last thought, re drugs to keep terminally ill patients comfortable - "it may exist but I have never heard of it" IT WOULD BE NICE, if expat's had an acceptable repository, where drugs could be "donated" by the families of the deceased - to assist those less fortunate. Given the potential for abuse and legalities, something like this could be difficult - but would not be impossible?

 

 

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CMBob    693

All good points, MalandLee, but I think the use of others' prescription drugs (unless handled through a pharmacist who knew exactly which drug was what) would be problematic and impossible.  And it could be illegal here (as it is in the US) for anybody to have possession of a controlled substance without a prescription in that person's name.

 

The only thing you mention that I wouldn't do is bother with any driving licenses....at least ones issued here or in the US.  While it might be smart to destroy same so nobody else could use them (I'd probably retain a photo of any licenses just in case the information is ever needed), the licenses will expire on their own eventually and probably not worth the time to deal with them.  I've never heard of any requirement to deal with those licenses after death although perhaps the UK has different regulations about that.

 

 

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MalandLee    151

You are probably correct Bob on the drug front. However, the "trade" does exist. Sadly because I am not sure of the legalities, I prefer not to expand what I know. I can say, there is a myriad of checks and ALL drugs are dispensed to the patient, on the order of a doctor and in the case of my friend, "FULL Doctor supervised pain management" was top notch. THERE WAS NO, (nor was there EVER) any SELF MEDICATION. I prefer not to say more.

 

My guess is members of each "tribe" that chooses to call Thailand their home, will have different requirements after a tribal member is deceased. I am an Aussie, would not have a clue what is needed after I depart this world, however, my (deeply bereaved) friends partner, has reminded me I must try and make the transition for my beautiful wife as seamless as possible - I will endeavour to do that.

 

We NEVER dwell on death, but, some practical steps have been taken. We have a will, plus an encrypted document, password protected, containing ALL known passwords, banking, insurance, etc... PLUS as much info as could possibly be needed to smooth out the bumps. Minimal but practical, I know.

 

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happyas    335

I am looking for advice please regarding an elderly guy whom i have recently befriended who is terminally ill and most likely will not see this year out.

He has absolutely no one who will help out after he passes, which leaves me to enquire.

Basically he is a pauper,lives month to month on a pension,has no savings, no family, no friends in his birth country.

When he does finally expire i'm just wondering would would happen with his body.

I read on here that most countries prefer a cremation in order to take remains back as cheap as possible.

He has no thoughts or cares about what happens to his remains, so what are the options for me?

Do i call the police here and let them deal with it,or not?

Would they cremate him and just throw his ashes away somewhere?

Is there an established course for me to take in any way,shape or form?

Sorry for such a lot of questions, but i am at a loss here,and would like to know what can be done for him.

Thanks for any advice in this delicate matter.

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Tarteso    187

Thanks for share... Many thanks.


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

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maewang99    424
Posted (edited)

US has a new law on this, so my only 2 cents on this is that you check what his home country's policy is. right? it can vary quite a lot. what country is it, I didn't see you mention it.
   

Edited by maewang99

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happyas    335
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, maewang99 said:

US has a new law on this, so my only 2 cents on this is that you check what his home country's policy is. right? it can vary quite a lot. what country is it, I didn't see you mention it.
   

I believe that he is a NZ citizen .

Edit..he is indeed NZer.

 

Edited by happyas

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Sheryl    9,038
6 hours ago, happyas said:

I am looking for advice please regarding an elderly guy whom i have recently befriended who is terminally ill and most likely will not see this year out.

He has absolutely no one who will help out after he passes, which leaves me to enquire.

Basically he is a pauper,lives month to month on a pension,has no savings, no family, no friends in his birth country.

When he does finally expire i'm just wondering would would happen with his body.

I read on here that most countries prefer a cremation in order to take remains back as cheap as possible.

He has no thoughts or cares about what happens to his remains, so what are the options for me?

Do i call the police here and let them deal with it,or not?

Would they cremate him and just throw his ashes away somewhere?

Is there an established course for me to take in any way,shape or form?

Sorry for such a lot of questions, but i am at a loss here,and would like to know what can be done for him.

Thanks for any advice in this delicate matter.

 

When he dies, police will be notified and will have his body taken to a nearby hospital morgue. They will notify his Embassy, assuming they locate hius passport. The Embassy will try to find "next of kin" for instructions about what to do with the body and it will remain in the hospital morgue until they do and issue permission to the hospital to release the body.

 

What happens if the Embassy cannot locate any next of kin, I don't know, but I'm sure it has happened not a few times.

 

In any case, nothing that you can or should do except call the police if you happen to be the first to find him.

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happyas    335
51 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

 

When he dies, police will be notified and will have his body taken to a nearby hospital morgue. They will notify his Embassy, assuming they locate hius passport. The Embassy will try to find "next of kin" for instructions about what to do with the body and it will remain in the hospital morgue until they do and issue permission to the hospital to release the body.

 

What happens if the Embassy cannot locate any next of kin, I don't know, but I'm sure it has happened not a few times.

 

In any case, nothing that you can or should do except call the police if you happen to be the first to find him.

Thank you Sheryl..i feel that it will be me who does find him,as there is really no one else who cares if he is not seen for a couple of days.

Quite sad , but he is a nice enough guy,who i sort of took pity on initially,and helped him out when he needed things.

Now, i'm in this position and want to do as much as i can to send him off as dignified as is possible.

I feel that no next of kin will even care,let alone want to be involved at the end.

As i said, quite sad, but i guess not so uncommon here.

When the inevitable does happen, i will notify the police as you suggest and let them deal with it.

Thanks.

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NancyL    6,818

Assuming the terminally ill man in question is in Muang Chiang Mai, he will probably be taken to Suan Dok (CMU) hospital upon passing.  There will be an autopsy to determine cause of death, something done for most deaths at home, unless the deceased was under the care of a physician for a diagnosed disease.  

 

Then, as Sheryl said, the man's Embassy will work very diligently to notify next-of-kin to assume responsibility for paying for his cremation at Suan Dok.  It can be quite economical.  Different Embassies have different policies about how they handle someone's personal effects.  The Americans will have someone from the Embassy/Consulate go to a person's condo gather all valuable items and documents and hold them in storage.  Most other countries don't do this and simply instruct the the building management to put items in storage or lock the room.  

 

If no one comes forward assume responsibility for the cost of his cremation (quite economical at Suan Dok) then eventually a Buddhist charity will make arrangements for a proper ceremony.  No one will be told about the place or time or be able to claim the remains, because if they want to come to pay final respects, well then, they should be prepared to pay for the service, shouldn't they?

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happyas    335
4 hours ago, NancyL said:

Assuming the terminally ill man in question is in Muang Chiang Mai, he will probably be taken to Suan Dok (CMU) hospital upon passing.  There will be an autopsy to determine cause of death, something done for most deaths at home, unless the deceased was under the care of a physician for a diagnosed disease.  

 

Then, as Sheryl said, the man's Embassy will work very diligently to notify next-of-kin to assume responsibility for paying for his cremation at Suan Dok.  It can be quite economical.  Different Embassies have different policies about how they handle someone's personal effects.  The Americans will have someone from the Embassy/Consulate go to a person's condo gather all valuable items and documents and hold them in storage.  Most other countries don't do this and simply instruct the the building management to put items in storage or lock the room.  

 

If no one comes forward assume responsibility for the cost of his cremation (quite economical at Suan Dok) then eventually a Buddhist charity will make arrangements for a proper ceremony.  No one will be told about the place or time or be able to claim the remains, because if they want to come to pay final respects, well then, they should be prepared to pay for the service, shouldn't they?

Thanks NancyL.

This and Sheryls post have given me all i need to know.

I may foot the bill for the cremation at least,and i guess i'll be the only one there to see him off.

Hopefully later than sooner.

 

PS Do you know roughly the cost of the cremation at Suan Dok please?

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YetAnother    1,959

lot of steps at a time of great stress

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NancyL    6,818

Someone with direct knowledge may chime in, but I believe it's around 5000 baht for a cremation at Suan Dok hospital.  

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