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Dying At Home In Chiang Mai

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I am gonna open a thread in Laos social media  about this subject.......totally unknown to me but very important.

Thank you very much for sharing!

 

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Very sorry to hear of your loss, Your post was written with great dignity without false pathos. I was moved by your post, i hope that she didn't suffer too much towards the end.

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I believe one can leave a certified letter (tetsabaan) specifying who is to take care of the funeral, i see no need to contact the British embassy what has it got to do with them.

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By law the body of a foreign nationsl cannot be released for cremation or burial without the permission of theit embassy. The purpose is to ensure that next of kin are notified.

Most embassies in Thailand have a registration system wherein you can provide next of kin/emergency contact info. Having this on file greatly expedites matters when you die. Otherwise the embassy has to notify the home office to do a search to figure out whom should be notified.

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Just now, Sheryl said:

By law the body of a foreign nationsl cannot be released for cremation or burial without the permission of theit embassy. The purpose is to ensure that next of kin are notified.

Most embassies in Thailand have a registration system wherein you can provide next of kin/emergency contact info. Having this on file greatly expedites matters when you die. Otherwise the embassy has to notify the home office to do a search to figure out whom should be notified.

Thanks for that, my relations are either in Germany or Australia although i have a few that i have rarely or never met in the UK, would be quite a problem for the home office. Would that mean that my body would be rotting away in the coffin until they had contacted my daughter in Germany to get permission from her to allow my son (10 years old at present) and my partner to cremate me ?

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9 minutes ago, soalbundy said:

 Would that mean that my body would be rotting away in the coffin until they had contacted my daughter in Germany to get permission from her to allow my son (10 years old at present) and my partner to cremate me ?

If you've done nothing to avoid that, sure, that could happen.  And, in that case, a simple phone call to your daughter isn't going to do it....she'd have to sign a form or two, have it notarized (and/or certified by somebody at the governmental level), and return it to your local embassy/consulate before they are going to give any permission for release of your body.  You can check with your local embassy/consulate website to see if they lay out the what happens when one of their nationals dies here, procedures for locating a next-of-kin, etc.

Presuming you want your "partner" to handle proceedings (cremation), you ought to make a Will here and specifically make some provisions about that issue.  Your local embassy/consulate will honor a valid Will made here (although they may require it to be translated into your native language).  And, obviously, your Will ought to state who gets what from your estate and other usual provisions (and, presuming you're not married to your partner and you want your partner to be the executor or receive any of your estate, you really, really, need a Will here badly).

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Posted (edited)
On 6/20/2017 at 9:39 AM, Sheryl said:

By law the body of a foreign nationsl cannot be released for cremation or burial without the permission of theit embassy. The purpose is to ensure that next of kin are notified.

Most embassies in Thailand have a registration system wherein you can provide next of kin/emergency contact info. Having this on file greatly expedites matters when you die. Otherwise the embassy has to notify the home office to do a search to figure out whom should be notified.

As always clearly stated by Sheryl,  perhaps worth adding that you can also record on the Australian embassy website that you do not want any family nembers  or whoever to be informed. In this case makes it easy for the embasy staff, no search for NOK needed. My guess is this is possible with many embassies.

I have done this, plus my will clearly states that my Thai adult son makes all decisions.

Edited by scorecard

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My condolences on the loss of your friend.  Thank you for the very moving post.

Does anyone know if good hospice care available anywhere in Thailand?

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End-of-life care is available at McKean Rehabilitation Center in Chiang Mai.  They don't call what they do "hospice" since that has a specific meaning.  Instead, they work with the patient, the family and the attending physician of the patient to fulfill the patient's desires about end-of-life care.  This is why it's important to have an Advance Directive, i.e. Living Will that spells out what decisions you'd like to be made on your behalf about care and medical procedures if you can't make decisions yourself.  

 

In general, Thai hospitals will do everything possible to keep a patient alive as long as possible (regardless of ability to pay).  This includes elderly people, stroke victims, people with dementia, etc.  They use CPR, ventilators, drugs to fight infection, drugs to raise falling blood pressure, feeding tubes, kidney dialysis, etc to keep someone alive even when it's evident they will never again enjoy life, or actually even have a clue they're alive.   Meanwhile, the person is in an ICU unit that's like being inside a pinball machine, surrounding by whirling, noisy, pinging machines in a well-lit room, with people talking and moving around.  

 

At McKean, a dying person is in quiet private room, with minimal intrusion, no invasive medical treatment and kept comfortable with medications to control pain and anxiety.  Their mouth is kept moist with gentle swabs, but at end-of-life, it's not appropriate to use a feeding tube or IV with someone whose internal organs are shutting down.   The staff knows how to read the body language of someone to keep them in a comfortable position and certainly, they're kept clean and in a room that is cheery and at an appropriate temperature.   

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BANGKOK 17 July 2018 05:18
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