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BANGKOK 17 October 2018 14:13

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gennisis

Chitterlings Or Chitlin

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I come from Bristol...south west of england where 'chitlin' was (is)? very popular,but very few pure pork butchers remain nowadays.When I left in 2000, Bristol only had 2 genuine pork butchers selling every part of the pig.

In Rimping and Topps I see the stomach(maul) big intestine(Fatty end) and small intestine(Twisted) for sale in its uncooked state.

Ive never cooked it before,but would like to and serve cold with vinegar and mustard.

Ive read various recipes which stress the careful cleaning required before boiling.

Has anyone here cooked them? and did they taste as at home???

Of course a pint of 'scrumpy' would wash the meal down well,but I guess I will have to make do with a can of 'Old English'.

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I come from Bristol...south west of england where 'chitlin' was (is)? very popular,but very few pure pork butchers remain nowadays.When I left in 2000, Bristol only had 2 genuine pork butchers selling every part of the pig.

In Rimping and Topps I see the stomach(maul) big intestine(Fatty end) and small intestine(Twisted) for sale in its uncooked state.

Ive never cooked it before,but would like to and serve cold with vinegar and mustard.

Ive read various recipes which stress the careful cleaning required before boiling.

Has anyone here cooked them? and did they taste as at home???

Of course a pint of 'scrumpy' would wash the meal down well,but I guess I will have to make do with a can of 'Old English'.

Most noodle shops use the "offal" in their soups...have a look at a couple of noodle sellers, it looks as if they just boil them and slice it up!

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and here I thought it was just in the Southern US people at chitlins!

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From Wiki

'Chitterling' is a Middle English word for the small intestines of a pig, especially as they are fried, roasted or stewed for food.[1] Middle English was the language spoken in England between 1066 and about 1470, and so the food dish has at least a medieval origin in Europe.

Chitterlings (often pronounced /ˈtʃɪtlɪnz/ and sometimes spelled chitlins or chittlins in vernacular) are the viscera intestines of a pig that have been prepared as food. In various countries across the world, such food is prepared and eaten either as part of a daily diet, or at special events, holidays or religious festivities.

:)

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Yes I buy Chitterlings from my local village market regularly. The butcher selling the pork intestines or cow/buffalo is quite clean , considering no refridgeration

on his sidewalk leanto . I buy fresh uncooked. It is given a real thorough wash , several times .

When I am happy they are clean , I cut into 3 inch lengths , then put in a bowl with some soy sauce and meat tenderiser for pork (available everywhere).

Then after marinating for about an hour I deep fry it until golden brown and serve- delicious !

The other way I have cooked it is by boiling for about 20 minutes , longer if you prefer more tender and then drain and cover until cool.

I then chop up an onion and a cucumber and add to the diced chitterlings and soak the lot in vineger. I use the dark vinegar from Big C and Sarsons is not on sale

where I live. Again delicious.

I have eaten chitterlings inthe mountains also , but it is custom for them NOT to be washed, they deep fry until crisp with the crap still inside. Its there way of doing it and told me that the flavour is far better with the filling , thats if it doesnt come out when being fried. I have suffered no sickness , possibly due to frying until crisp but equally delish.

Enjoy .

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We did some when we slaughtered a pig last month (full write up in the Issan forum), the intestings were washed out with a low pressure hose with water then well boiled for a few minutes, afterwards finished off on the BBQ grill. Eaten about 45 minutes after the pig was still squeeling.

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