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expatriot

Proof Of Retirement Income

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please correct my understanding that.... RETIREMENT visa.. 50+ years older... the financial qualifications are either A) 800,000 BAHT deposit into Thai bamk for period not less than 3 months... or :) evidence showing yeasrly income 400,000 BAHT..

Please advise papers to prepare income qualifications.... Immigration retirement Visa financial income source declaration,,,

The source of income reported is from a foreign bank...

Income source is a term deposit income... retained at a bank not inside Thailand, a bank with no remote office in Thailand...

The bank is a large VISA credit card recognized USA bank offices operating inside the USA

The interest income statement is prepared in US dollars as the annual earned interest % paid for the term deposit... by foreign USA bank...

Please advise what papers as the income documents are recognized to show income to Thailand Immigration... at time of Visa application...

Thank you

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My understanding of it is, if not married to a Thai, you need:

a) 800,000 baht deposited in a Thai bank for a period of not less than 3 months: or

:) An income equating to at least 65,000 baht according to the exchange rate at the time of the application.

c) An annual amount of deposit funds plus income providing the combination of the two comes to no less than 800,000 baht.

I do it on monthly income only (it's over 65,000 baht) by producing a copy of my UK P60 along with a letter from the British Honorary Consul. I believe you can also do it on income other than pension but I don't know what documents are required.

This is my understanding of the rules, someone else may tell you different. Hope it helps.

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Yes, proof of income (65,000 baht/month) has to be obtained from the relevant Embassy/Consulate. The amounts if actually married to a Thai reduce to 400,000 baht bank balance, or 40,000 baht/month income.

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The USA embassy in Bangkok requires no proof of income to get your embassy letter that you use at Thai immigration. You put down the figure on their form and sign that it is true. Thai immigration officers, at their discretion, may ask you to back up this letter with some documentation. I don't know if the officers are more likely to ask for this documentation of Americans, who they know do not need to provide any proof to their embassies to get the letter.

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The USA embassy in Bangkok requires no proof of income to get your embassy letter that you use at Thai immigration. You put down the figure on their form and sign that it is true.

That is pretty interesting/amazing

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The USA embassy in Bangkok requires no proof of income to get your embassy letter that you use at Thai immigration. You put down the figure on their form and sign that it is true.

That is pretty interesting/amazing

How so? The US Embassy is only administering an oath and witnessing a signature, not guaranteeing any amount stated on the proof of income form. You affirm (swear) that the information you provided on the form is true and accurate under penalty of perjury.

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The USA embassy in Bangkok requires no proof of income to get your embassy letter that you use at Thai immigration. You put down the figure on their form and sign that it is true.

That is pretty interesting/amazing

How so? The US Embassy is only administering an oath and witnessing a signature, not guaranteeing any amount stated on the proof of income form. You affirm (swear) that the information you provided on the form is true and accurate under penalty of perjury.

Well I meant it in contrast to the alternatives such as a seasoned savings account which leaves no doubt.

If it were consistent then they would also accept your sworn oath that you have that without the need for a bank book :)

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The USA embassy in Bangkok requires no proof of income to get your embassy letter that you use at Thai immigration. You put down the figure on their form and sign that it is true.

That is pretty interesting/amazing

How so? The US Embassy is only administering an oath and witnessing a signature, not guaranteeing any amount stated on the proof of income form. You affirm (swear) that the information you provided on the form is true and accurate under penalty of perjury.

Most other embassies require more than your word, that's all.

I still think its important, even more so for Americans, to bring along some kind of documentation of income in case the officer asks for it. They have every right to do so.

Note to mods -- this thread belongs in the VISAS forum, yes?

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1. A retirement visa (long stay non immigrant OA) is issued in home country - you seem to be asking about a one year extension of stay for retirement reasons.

2. Requirement requires 800k in Thai bank account 2 months (first time) and bank letter/account book; or 65k per month income and Embassy letter; or a combination to meet the 800k amount on a yearly basis.

3. The requirement does not change with marriage. But there are other extensions of stay available (not retirement) with different requirements.

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quote 1: The USA embassy in Bangkok requires no proof of income to get your embassy letter that you use at Thai immigration. Quote 2.That is pretty interesting/amazing. Not really -- Here's at least in part why:

U.S. Consular officers are not empowered to authenticate public documents issued in the United States. Such documents include vital records (birth, marriage, death and divorce), as well as academic,
commercial,
or other credentials. Consular Officers do not have access to the records of the issuing office or the seal of the custodian of these records.

Procedures for Authentication and Legalizing Official Documents Issued In the United States

Official documents requiring authentication will need to be certified first by the entity that issued them, then by the state in which that entity is located, and then by the federal government (the U.S. State Department). Once the document has been authenticated by the U.S. State Department, the foreign embassy in the United States of the country requesting the document will perform a final authentication. Following is a brief outline of what will be required (though the actual requirements will vary greatly from state to state)...

To authenticate and legalize official documents issued in the United States, please follow the steps below. Thereafter, (lengthy) Steps 1-6.

So, given the above, Thailand has agreed that a sworn statement before a US Consular Official, with Thai Immigration reserving the Right to request any document of additional proof, will suffice for a USA citizen for Proof of Income purposes... Remember Martha Stewart, the Billionaire, who was sent to jail, not for illegal stock trades, but for lying to a US government Official... beyond any documents, the real giveaway the Thai Immigration Police will notice is body language.

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Interpolations of financial documents ("or other regular income from a source outside of Thailand;")

Back ground bank deposit... financial outside of Thailand

Investment income... retained term (time period) bank deposit, 7%AUD interest income.

Banks calculate the annual percentage income on principle term deposits... Percentage of

Bank Deposit interest compounded is the cash income available after one year if one decide

to withdraw... or one may decide to compound and continue term deposit i.e. over 5 years....

Declaration of income from ("outside of Thailand") is vague... worded as monthly income amount..

not specified as the ANNUAL income qualification generated outside of Thailand..

May Immigration interpolate regular annual 7% interest income? replace worded 65,000 Baht monthly?

Or

Some other mechanisms of monthly 65,000 Baht cash flow transfer is mandatory for retirement VISA ?

("or other regular income from a source outside of Thailand;")

From the US Ebassy qualifications for Retirement Visa

Retirement Visas

Retirement visas for Thailand are available to foreigners 50 years of age or older. These visas are valid for only one year and employment of any kind is strictly prohibited. According to Thai immigration, applicants must meet the following qualifications:

Applicant must be able to provide proof of a pension or other regular income from a source outside of Thailand;

Applicant’s pension or other regular income must be no less than the equivalent of 65,000 Baht per month;

Alternatively, the applicant may meet the financial requirement by maintaining a Thai bank account with a minimum amount of 800,000 Baht. (Applicants will need to show that they have 800,000 Baht in savings each year when they renew their visa.)

Any applicant married to a Thai citizen may be able to receive a visa on that basis rather than retirement.

For additional requirements and information, please consult the Ministry of Foreign Affairs or the Royal Thai Embassy in Washington, D.C. websites.

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I find your post unclear.

Anyway, some points.

The US embassy info (why are you looking there??) about THAI retirement qualifications is missing the COMBO method. That involves adding your ANNUAL income PLUS your banked Thai account to get annual extensions based on retirement IN Thailand. That amount must exceed 800K annually.

This monthly/annual thing is a red herring. Just multiply the monthly by 12 and you have the annual. If you are using the combo method, just annualize it.

If you are have enough income to qualify by income alone, the income must be 65K monthly or more. Yes 65K x 12 equals 780K, not 800K. That is quirky but that's the rules.

You do need to find the exchange rate the immigration office will use. It is safer to assume a very bad exchange rate while preparing to qualify.

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I find your post unclear.

Anyway, some points.

The US embassy info (why are you looking there??) about THAI retirement qualifications is missing the COMBO method. That involves adding your ANNUAL income PLUS your banked Thai account to get annual extensions based on retirement IN Thailand. That amount must exceed 800K annually.

This monthly/annual thing is a red herring. Just multiply the monthly by 12 and you have the annual. If you are using the combo method, just annualize it.

If you are have enough income to qualify by income alone, the income must be 65K monthly or more. Yes 65K x 12 equals 780K, not 800K. That is quirky but that's the rules.

You do need to find the exchange rate the immigration office will use. It is safer to assume a very bad exchange rate while preparing to qualify.

If I understand correctly, the demonstrated monthly income does not need to be shown to be coming into Thailand, while the lump sum deposit (Bht 800k, or whatever combo) must be shown to be held in a Thai bank. Is that right?

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Correctomundo.

That's for extensions.

For those going for an O-A in their home country, even the banked amount does not need to be in Thailand.

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BANGKOK 28 July 2017 15:54
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