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tod-daniels

The Thai Political Word Thread. ..

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Given that a person is unable to turn on the television, radio or sometimes even leave their apartment without running into red shirt protests, I think we should have a thai political word thread, which lists common words and definitions concerning the recent political situation.

Then again I could be wrong. …

I’ll start it off with these words (some that I ripped off the internet) as I had no clue;

(Sorry I made the font big, the line of my eyes is long :D )

รัฐบาล - government

รัฐธรรมนูญ -constitution

นายกรัฐมนตรี often just รัฐมนตรี - prime minister

คอรัปชั่น - corruption (transliterated engrish)

สองมาตรฐาน - double standard

อมาตย์ - ?? (ruling elite??)

อมาตยาธิปไตย - government by bureaucrats

แก้ไข - amend

ยุบสภา - dissolve parliament

Factions;

นปช. - กลุ่มแนวร่วมประชาธิปไตยขับไล่เผด็จการแห่งชาติ UDDT (United Front for Democracy against Dictatorship of Thailand); Redz (no wonder everyone uses the abbreviations on these names!! :) )

aka:

ม็อบเสื้อแดง - Mob of Red Shirts

เสื้อแดง - Red Shirts

พธม. - พันธมิตรประชาชนเพื่อประชาธิปไตย PAD (People's Alliance for Democracy) Yellowz

aka;

พันธมิตร -

ม็อบเสื้อเหลือง - Mob of Yellow Shirts

เสื้อเหลือง - Yellow Shirts

People;

อภิสิทธิ์ เวชชาชีวะ Abhisit Vejjajiva - often referred to as just มาร์ค (Mark)

วีระ มุสิกพงศ์ - Veera Musikapong

จตุพร พรหมพันธุ์ - Jatuporn Prompham

ดร. เหวง โตจิราการ - Dr Weng Tojirakarn -

Please add more to this list!! Considering the current situation in thailand it is quite a relevant thread (please add abbreviations so maybe someday we can read the thai newspaper too!) :D

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Great list, Todd. Let me add a bit of an addition:

I believe that "แก้ไข" is a general term meaning "to fix, mend, revise, amend, improve". A more technical term used in a legislative sense is "แปรญัตติ" meaning "to mend; amend a motion; propose an amendment; move to amend; propose a motion to amend; change a proposal; revise a proposal; interpret a proposal" (Lexitron). Certainly the former is more widely used by ชาวบ้าน than the latter.

Here is an example from Matichon:

สภาตั้งคณะกรรมาธิการวิสามัญไปแปรญัตติเพื่อนำกลับมาพิจารณาในสภาวาระ 2 และ 3

"The House created a special commission to propose amendments for consideration [by the House] during its second and third terms."

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To add some of the courts to Todd's list:

ศาลฎีกา - The Supreme Court

ศาลฎีกาแผนกคดีอาญาของผู้ดำรงตำแหน่งทางการเมือง - The Supreme Court's Criminal Tribunal for Political Office Holders

ศาลยุติธรรม - Court of Justice

ศาลรัฐธรรมนูญ - Constitutional Court

หมายจับ - an arrest warrant

หมายศาล - court warrant; summons; subpoena; court order

นักโทษหนีคดี - fugitive from justice

ผู้ต้องหา - a person charged with an offense; alleged offender

Any others of interest?

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This is turning into general legal terms; might as well throw in a few more:

หมายค้น - search warrant

ผู้ต้องสงสัย - (the) suspect (in a crime)

คดี - case (e.g. case in court)

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Great thread, Tod.

One minor correction: นายกรัฐมนตรี (prime minister) is often shortened to นายก. รัฐมนตรี is a cabinet minister, shortened from รัฐมนตรีว่าการ.

ผู้ว่า is kind of a broad term for government bigshot/senior official, usually the governor of a province, or mayor (e.g., กรุงเทพฯ). ผู้ว่า sounds a lot like the term that Latino street gangs use for boss (literally translated from Spanish as "he who speaks"), but the Thai is actually a short form of ผู้ว่าราชการ

As for ศาลฎีกา - wasn't that a hi-so discotheque that burned down on New Years Eve? (Who would name a disco The Supreme Court, anyway?)

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การเดินขบวน /karn-dern-khabuan/

demonstration

p.s. someone buy Tod a drink; best idea for a new thread I've seen in ages. :)

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Here are some interesting sentences from the political arena:

ส่วนการเคลื่อนไหวมีนัยยะทางการเมืองอะไรหรือนั้น พล.อ.วินัยกล่าวว่า "ผมว่ามันก็ธรรมดา เป็นธรรมดาที่ก็คงคิดว่าการเคลื่อนไหวใดๆ ก็คงจะหวังผลต่อการเลือกตั้ง ก็คงจะใช่"

As to the question of whether or not these movements have political implications, General Winai said, “Well, I think this is normal; it is natural to think that [those who participate in these] activities wish to affect the elections. I think this is true.”

น่าจะมีการชุมนุมตั้งแต่วันที่ 16 กุมภาพันธ์ ซึ่งเป็นวันตัดสินคดียึดทรัพย์ 7.6 หมื่นล้านบาทของ พ.ต.ท.ทักษิณ

There are likely to be demonstrations starting on February 16th which is the date that [the courts] will decide the suit to confiscate the 7.6 billion baht belonging to Pol. Col. Thaksin Shinawatra.

มีเนื้อหาความสำคัญอยู่ในระดับเดียวกับกรณีการตัดสินให้ นายสมัคร สุนทรเวช พ้นจากตำแหน่งนายกรัฐมนตรี โทษฐานปรุงอาหารออกรายการทีวี

[This decision] has the same level of importance as the decision to expel Mr. Samak Suntharawet from his position of prime minister to punish him based on [his participation in] a T.V. cooking program.

And, a phrase:

ประกาศภาวะฉุกเฉิน – to declare a state of emergency

Any corrections and comments are appreciated.

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Was playing around with Thai dictionary and just found that

อภิสิทธิ์ - Abhisit

Also has the meaning of a privileged person or someone from a privileged class. Could that possibly be the reason why he annoys so many Thais?

JJ

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Could be the reason the Red's picked that particular phrase to focus attention on...imagine if he'd been called อิทธิพล (another common Thai name), no doubt the war cry would have been about the injustice caused by those with 'influence'.

You're right that there's a lot in a name, but I'm not sure its the name that caused the problem...

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การเดินขบวน /karn-dern-khabuan/

demonstration

p.s. someone buy Tod a drink; best idea for a new thread I've seen in ages. :)

Agree, great thread idea. :D

This word also means 'a march' or 'a parade'... it is often used in connection with demonstrations as in marches for political purposes but can also be used in a more general sense, as in, for example, a parade during a festival of some kind. Due to เดิน I don't think it could be used for a standing or sitting demonstration... nor for a demonstration in the sense of 'sales demonstration'.

This is probably obvious to you SoftWater, but I just thought I'd throw it in for those who are complete beginners.

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The word I seem to hear most often to describe a demonstration or protest is :-

การ ประท้วง - gaan bpratuang

JJ

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A few more:

ศูนย์อำนวยการรักษาความสงบเรียบร้อย (ศอ.รส.) – Internal Security Operations Center (ISOC)

ผู้บัญชาการทหารบก (ผบ.ทบ.) – Army commander in Chief

อหิงสา – non-violence

ขาดความชอบธรรม – to lack legitimacy

สู้ไม่ถอย – lit. fight without retreat; to be unyielding; ‘Never give up’

คอรัปชั่น – corruption (transcription) > ทุจริต - corruption (Thai)

อย่าเอาเรื่องทุจริตมาเล่น

Don’t play the corruption card.

เขาจะสู้จนกว่ารัฐบาลจะยุบสภา

They will fight on until the government dissolves parliament.

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การเดินขบวน /karn-dern-khabuan/

demonstration

p.s. someone buy Tod a drink; best idea for a new thread I've seen in ages. :)

Agree, great thread idea. :D

This word also means 'a march' or 'a parade'... it is often used in connection with demonstrations as in marches for political purposes but can also be used in a more general sense, as in, for example, a parade during a festival of some kind. Due to เดิน I don't think it could be used for a standing or sitting demonstration... nor for a demonstration in the sense of 'sales demonstration'.

This is probably obvious to you SoftWater, but I just thought I'd throw it in for those who are complete beginners.

Very little is obvious to me about Thai, meadish. Thanks for the extra insights, JJ also.

Perhaps การเดินขบวน is better translated as 'procession' (thinking back, I think this was the context in which I learned it).

I never thought about the concept of a 'sales demonstration' - wonder what that is called?

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Here's a few more;

Another Red Shirt;

อริสมันต์ พงษ์เรืองรอง Arisaman Pongruangrong - Former Pop singer (who wasn't too bad and has some good songs :) ) turned firebrand Red mouthpiece (pending arrest I think for advocating something less than a non-violent stance). ..

A few catchy phrases from the Red headbands.

Really gotta give 'em credit for getting the meaning across with such a few words.

มึงไม่ยุบ กูไม่กลับ - You don't dissolve, I won't go home

ไม่จ้าง กูมาเอง - Not hired. I came myself

กู ขอแค่ ยุบสภา - I only ask dissolve Parliament (not sure on this one as the head band was in use)

Add any ones you come across, they really are quite good as headbands go.

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The word I seem to hear most often to describe a demonstration or protest is :-

การ ประท้วง - gaan bpratuang

JJ

Looking at Lexitron for ประท้วง, Lexitron gives the following example:

พนักงานประท้วงเพื่อขอขึ้นเงินเดือน which I translate as

panak-ngarn bpra-tuang pheua kor keun ngern deuan

[staff protest for request rise money monthly]

1. The staff demanded a pay rise.

But...perhaps ประท้วง indicates some kind of more immediate action as in

2. 'The staff protested in order to get a pay rise.'

('protested' as in 'held some kind of demonstration')

Any feeling about which is better, 1 or 2? Obviously, the sense is quite different.

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BANGKOK 20 October 2017 12:22
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