Neeranam

Let's Learn One Word A Day.

602 posts in this topic

Beginner - You have a beautiful smile - koon me yim suay

Intermediate - Do you want to go see a movie together - bpai doo nang duay gan mai?

Advanced - Excuse me, can you help me please,I've lost my phone number can I borrow yours? - kor thawt na khrap, pom tham ber thorasap haai, kor yeaum ber kong koon dai mai?

Incidentally, the very first words to my wife were the advanced ones and it worked!

Haha did you borrow her number or her phone?

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Beginner - You have a beautiful smile - koon me yim suay

Intermediate - Do you want to go see a movie together - bpai doo nang duay gan mai?

Advanced - Excuse me, can you help me please,I've lost my phone number can I borrow yours? - kor thawt na khrap, pom tham ber thorasap haai, kor yeaum ber kong koon dai mai?

Incidentally, the very first words to my wife were the advanced ones and it worked!

Haha did you borrow her number or her phone?

Actually, after asking her if she'd help me and she said yes, I continued and she was so confused she gave me her number andasked me to join her friend and her in the hotel bar.
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Haven't seem this one here yet, might come in handy:

ค้ำประกัน - collateral, to guarantee, to vouch for smbd.

i.e.

ทำไมเดี๋ยวนี้ทำงานบริษัทต้องมีคนค้ำประกัน - Why these days they require guarantors upon (one's) employment into a company?
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That one I remember looking for for a good while:

ธัญพืช (tun-ya-phuet) - cereals (plants)

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wow,is it too late for me to see?

Very good resource to absorb and all are good guys to learn,,,gud....i'm starting from the very first beginning.....

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Enough.

I have enough money - pom mee ngern phaw

I don't have enough money - pom mai mee ngern phaw

3,000 baht should be enough - sam pan baht kong phaw

Is it big enough? - Yai phaw mai?

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Can someone please tell me how to say 'supposed to' eg 'you are supposed to drive on the left side of the road'

If you could write here in thai also that would be great thanks

Sent from my GT-I9100T using Thaivisa Connect Thailand mobile app

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Recent news articles written about the "rice pledging" program discuss the price of rice being paid per unit. Sometimes the price is quoted in "tons", other times by the "cartload". For example, take this passage:

"การลดราคารับจำนำข้าวของรัฐบาล จากเกวียนละ 15,000 บาท เหลือเกวียนละ 12,000 บาท ด้วยเหตุผลเพื่อความสมดุลทางงบประมาณ ที่จะเริ่มต้นในเดือนตุลาคมที่จะถึงนี้ อาจจะทำให้ชาวนาหลายจังหวัด โดยเฉพาะในพื้นที่ภาคกลาง อยู่ในสภาพที่กลืนไม่เข้าคายไม่ออก"

I believe this means,

"The reduction in the price which is paid for rice under the government’s rice pledging program from 15,000 baht per cart-weight to 12,000 baht for budgetary reasons beginning this October, will cause farmers in many provinces, especially those in the Central region, to be thrown into an uncomfortable position."

Here are some of the definitions I found for the terms "เกวียน" and "ตัน":

ข้าว 1 เกวียน มี 1000 กก. (เปลือก)

One “cartload” of rice equals 1,000 kilograms of un-milled rice.

http://topicstock.pantip.com/wahkor/topicstock/2011/08/X10945770/X10945770.html

ตัน ๒ น. มาตรานํ้าหนักและมาตราวัด มีหลายอัตราแล้วแต่วัตถุที่ใช้ คือ ๑. เมตริกตัน มาตราชั่ง เท่ากับนํ้าหนัก ๑,๐๐๐ กิโลกรัม

. . . . ton, def. 2, noun, a measurement of weight. There are several standards, depending on the material used. That is, 1. A “metric ton” is a measure of weight equal to 1,000 kilograms.

http://rirs3.royin.go.th/new-search/word-search-all-x.asp

Domnern Sathienpong: “เกยียน – a measure of rice equal to 100 tang or 150 kilograms”

“ เกวียนหลวง – a unit of volume equal to 2,000 liters”

Is it correct to say that in contemporary parlance a เกวียน (cartload or cart-weight) is equal to one metric ton with respect to unmilled rice?

Thanks.

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Recent news articles written about the "rice pledging" program discuss the price of rice being paid per unit. Sometimes the price is quoted in "tons", other times by the "cartload". For example, take this passage:

"การลดราคารับจำนำข้าวของรัฐบาล จากเกวียนละ 15,000 บาท เหลือเกวียนละ 12,000 บาท ด้วยเหตุผลเพื่อความสมดุลทางงบประมาณ ที่จะเริ่มต้นในเดือนตุลาคมที่จะถึงนี้ อาจจะทำให้ชาวนาหลายจังหวัด โดยเฉพาะในพื้นที่ภาคกลาง อยู่ในสภาพที่กลืนไม่เข้าคายไม่ออก"

I believe this means,

"The reduction in the price which is paid for rice under the governments rice pledging program from 15,000 baht per cart-weight to 12,000 baht for budgetary reasons beginning this October, will cause farmers in many provinces, especially those in the Central region, to be thrown into an uncomfortable position."

Here are some of the definitions I found for the terms "เกวียน" and "ตัน":

ข้าว 1 เกวียน มี 1000 กก. (เปลือก)

One cartload of rice equals 1,000 kilograms of un-milled rice.

http://topicstock.pantip.com/wahkor/topicstock/2011/08/X10945770/X10945770.html

ตัน ๒ น. มาตรานํ้าหนักและมาตราวัด มีหลายอัตราแล้วแต่วัตถุที่ใช้ คือ ๑. เมตริกตัน มาตราชั่ง เท่ากับนํ้าหนัก ๑,๐๐๐ กิโลกรัม

. . . . ton, def. 2, noun, a measurement of weight. There are several standards, depending on the material used. That is, 1. A metric ton is a measure of weight equal to 1,000 kilograms.

http://rirs3.royin.go.th/new-search/word-search-all-x.asp

Domnern Sathienpong: เกยียน a measure of rice equal to 100 tang or 150 kilograms

เกวียนหลวง a unit of volume equal to 2,000 liters

Is it correct to say that in contemporary parlance a เกวียน (cartload or cart-weight) is equal to one metric ton with respect to unmilled rice?

Thanks.

This makes my head spin.

Do you need both definitions?

Domnern S's 100 tang or 150 kg. contradicts the RID's 1000 kg. doesn't it?

Anyway the RID clearly says that 1 cartload = 1000kg. Does it not?

Personally when I see มาตราน้ำหนั มาตราวัด I see units of weight and units of volume; A cartload is a unit of volume and a ton is a unit of weight.

ตัน ๒ น. มาตรานํ้าหนักและมาตราวัด มีหลายอัตราแล้วแต่วัตถุที่ใช้ คือ ๑. เมตริกตัน มาตราชั่ง เท่ากับนํ้าหนัก ๑,๐๐๐ กิโลกรัม

From the RID (Tun 1 means blocked) ton 2 unit of weight and unit of volume there are several standard units depending on the thing being assessed, namely; 1. Metric ton; a measure of weight equal to a weight of 1000kg.

The next part of the definition explains that this is equal to 16 2/3 หาบหลวง or 1.13 cubic meters etc. which really makes my head spin so I prefer to not know! but doesn't include cartloads which appears to be more modern and restricted to rice measurement althought my 2525 edition doesn't say so in the definition of เกวียน . I doubt that many people are expected to care, the government puts out figures and obfuscates by mixing the units, farmers probably measure by weight not เกวียน and are interested only in that 12 is less than 15.

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Enough.

I have enough money - pom mee ngern phaw

I don't have enough money - pom mai mee ngern phaw

3,000 baht should be enough - sam pan baht kong phaw

Is it big enough? - Yai phaw mai?

Someone correct me if I'm wrong but Sentence 2 looks like mixed up word order. The structure should be "ผมมีเงินไม่พอ"

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Enough.

I have enough money - pom mee ngern phaw

I don't have enough money - pom mai mee ngern phaw

3,000 baht should be enough - sam pan baht kong phaw

Is it big enough? - Yai phaw mai?

Someone correct me if I'm wrong but Sentence 2 looks like mixed up word order. The structure should be "ผมมีเงินไม่พอ"

Not incorrect but I say เงินผมไม่พอ. A verbless sentence which is a feature of Thai.

I think that ผมไม่มีเงินพอ says 'I don't have' then contradicts with ' do have'. It sounds English, but there is little difference between Thai and English syntax in fact.

มี Is a good verb to leave out; กว๋ยเตี๋ยวราคา50บาท is an example which we would say ก๋วยเตี๋ยวมีราคา50บาท.

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ID: 472   Posted (edited)

ค้ำประกัน - collateral, to guarantee, to vouch for smbd.

i.e.

ทำไมเดี๋ยวนี้ทำงานบริษัทต้องมีคนค้ำประกัน - Why these days they require guarantors upon (one's) employment into a company?

This one was posted months ago.

I am interested in "these days" which it gives as

เดี๋ยวนี้

Never heard เดี๋ยว used for a day is that all pukkha?

Any more examples of use?

Also, if one's referring to these days in a longer time frame example

"These days things have changed"

...is it appropriate?

Thanks

Edited by cheeryble

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ค้ำประกัน - collateral, to guarantee, to vouch for smbd.

i.e.

ทำไมเดี๋ยวนี้ทำงานบริษัทต้องมีคนค้ำประกัน - Why these days they require guarantors upon (one's) employment into a company?

This one was posted months ago.

I am interested in "these days" which it gives as

เดี๋ยวนี้

Never heard เดี๋ยว used for a day is that all pukkha?

Any more examples of use?

Also, if one's referring to these days in a longer time frame example

"These days things have changed"

...is it appropriate?

Thanks

เดี๋ยวนี้ means this moment, now, or similar, the context dictates that it is translated as 'these days' ปัจจุบัน or similar.

I was wondering why คนค้ำประกัน was used rather than ผู้รับรอง. Any ideas on that?

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Sorry, been neglecting this thread.

Here is a word to learn today.

Document - เอกสาร - ake a san ake(low) a(low) san(risisng)

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วินัยตนเอง - winai dton eng - self-discipline

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This is a great idea!

I'm definately a biginner, can use all the help I can get.

I'll check back often, hope this thread stays alive!

Howler, looks like no one else is interested.

How about letting us know what you want to learn - maybe I can help a bit.

How about a beginners thread?

There are a lot more beginners on this forum than experts or advanced.

koon yoo tee Groong Thayp nan thoarai? How long have you live in Bangkok?

ma nee boi mai? do you come here often?

chewmong la thoaroai how much is it per hour?

I know Farangs who know lots of Thai words, but cannot speak any sentences, It is very hard to put individual Thai words into sentences, It is like trying to do a jigsaw puzzle, only with words. It is not hard to learn one Thai word a day, but keeping them in you head is something else also.

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Can anyone give me the pahk neua dialect term for "Corner" please?

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Can anyone give me the pahk neua dialect term for "Corner" please?

corner means มุม in standard Thai - and this our friends should understand throughout the nation

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BANGKOK 26 May 2017 20:13
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