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1.2 Million Thais Are Addicted To Drugs

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I hope people will now understand why so many Thai people back the "war on drug" despite whatever bleeding heart (and hypocritical) democrats have to say.

Drug addicts are victims and sick people who should be helped. Dug traffickers and all those who, directly and indirectly, profit from their traffick are the worst form of criminal, at the same level as peadophile and should be treated accordingly. I really don't understand people who, for petty political gain, oppose the war on drug. I guess most of them are users crazy.gif which may explain the disfunction of their brain.

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2% of the Thai population are drug addicts. speaks volumes

Counting alcohol as a drug the true percentage would be closer to 10%.

You fail to mention Cigarettes , Nicotine addiction kills millions per annum.

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Dug traffickers and all those who, directly and indirectly, profit from their traffick are the worst form of criminal, at the same level as peadophile and should be treated accordingly.

Yep, lets hope ole Takki Shinegra gives the order again. wink.png

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Drug use has definatly increased, but at the same time so has the soical disparite between the have and have nots. I wonder which side of the social divide the majority of drug addicts fall. The link between poverty, lack of opportunity, dysfunctional families and drug use has been clearly established. Until these social issues which underpin drug use are effectively address, the government is fighting a losing battle. Other strategies need to be purseued in conjunction with stricter anti drug laws to make any changes effective and long lasting and provide hope and real opportunity for a better life to those addicted to or at risk of drug addiction.

Other wise the choice is simply - A shit life in a village with no future or a shit life in jail with no future - hardly a tempting choice for those stuck in a cycle of poverty.

My wife acknowledged that there is a Yaba problem in her village, primarily with the male children (teenagers and young adults). It seems to be pretty well corralated to income and opportunity, ie, how poor the kids parents are and how much of a viable future these kids think they have. Kids from families with higher incomes seem to get wrapped up in the use of Yaba via peer pressure. We pulled her son out of the village when he was 15, primarily to get him away from the other kids. We now have him enrolled in school in Chiang Mai. He's now looking at starting Uni next year. I feel sorry for the other kids...no prospect, no future, go parental direction -- and they turn to drugs and alcohol, and then maybe jail. It's partially a social and ecomonic problem. Treatment and education might be a good start, but how do you solve the underlying ecomonic disparity?

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I have personally seen drug use in Holland and used myself (xtc) and most of us were casual users with a normal life and work next to it. Some people however can't handle it. But many can. Must be a factor like meom is talking about.

Just like you get people who get addicted to alcohol

There is a line of thinking that substance abuse is really just self-medication. The user is suppressing over active areas of the brain and/ or stimulating under active areas. Therapy that deals with the chemical imbalances of the brain is much more successful than other forms.

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Drug use has definatly increased, but at the same time so has the soical disparite between the have and have nots. I wonder which side of the social divide the majority of drug addicts fall. The link between poverty, lack of opportunity, dysfunctional families and drug use has been clearly established. Until these social issues which underpin drug use are effectively address, the government is fighting a losing battle. Other strategies need to be purseued in conjunction with stricter anti drug laws to make any changes effective and long lasting and provide hope and real opportunity for a better life to those addicted to or at risk of drug addiction.

Other wise the choice is simply - A shit life in a village with no future or a shit life in jail with no future - hardly a tempting choice for those stuck in a cycle of poverty.

Nope it depends on the individual, my wife came form the kind of shi* no hope you mention and is doing very well thanks after taking 3-4 years to get her degree by working all hours, coming to BKK at age 14 with her Brother etc.

Im sure many of these losers are plain bone idle laybouts even without the drugs, never mind we can always blame poverty.........

Good for your wife! Hope you teach your children well.. There is a flaw to your logic though; we can't really use your luvvly wife as a benchmark for all human behaviour now, can we?

I never mentioned she was, I was arguing the point of "poverty" as an excuse amongst other things like being bone idle etc.

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Let's see about 64,000,000 people in Thailand and 1.2 Mill are drug addicts.

About 23,000,000 people in Australia and I reckon we would have 1.2 Mill on drugs, if not more.

What's the problem.

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A lot of work has to be done in the anti drug war. Even those who say that they only use occaisionally need treatment of some kind or another before they move from just being 'weak willed' persons to outright addicts.

There's no doubt, anyone stupid and weak enough to dabble in drugs are just climbing aboard the slippery slide to being a full addict !

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The roads are " death traps " If it isn't talking on a mobile phone, driving fast behind the vehicle infront., alcohol then it's high on drugs and what does the country do about it? <deleted> all.

I witnessed an accident every week on the roads , saw a Pick up slam into a tuk tuk crashing it into a spiral and 3 people inside, badly injured this week, The pick up kept going , although a motorbike went after it. When is the country going to wake up? I tell you when ?NEVER!

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I found this on the last page of this forum topic.

It states that back then in 2003, there were 63,000,000 Thais and there were 3,000,000 on drugs.

Posted 2003-11-09 23:54:28

Thais use morality against meth

BAN PANG LAO, Thailand - This rice-farming village in the hills of northern Thailand was being destroyed by drugs.

Children stole from family rice stores to buy methamphetamine -- the drug of choice for most Thai addicts -- and outsiders drove into town all night long to buy the little orange pills from a few dozen villagers who had taken up drug dealing full-time.

Then, backed up by angry residents and relatives, village elders threatened the drug dealers and users with a terrifying fate for a Thai: If they died, no one would attend their funerals and no monk would say prayers for their souls.

The dealers and users soon went clean, and no one suffered ostracism.

"The thing villagers fear most is dying and not having anyone help with their cremation," said Sumalee Wanarat, a former teacher who now works with Ban Pang Lao's anti-drug program.

Thai Buddhists believe the soul will be consigned to ###### if funeral rites are not performed properly.

A well-attended funeral -- usually an elaborate affair of relatives and musicians -- is one of the main requirements of a proper cremation.

"We set up village rules and told them that if they were involved with drugs, we would cut them off from the community completely," said Sumalee.

The last of the 53 known drug dealers in the village of 1,500 people gave up the trade within months. Addicts were weaned from the habit.

"We have to depend on ourselves because we suffer the consequences, not the outsiders," Sumalee said.

Ban Pang Lao's success is being touted as a model for Thais to come up with indigenous -- and perhaps ingenious -- ways to combat the country's drug epidemic, and government officials brought foreign journalists to the village to show off its achievement.

Previously, Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra's administration had focused on a bloody campaign to wipe out drug dealers, giving police wide latitude to arrest suspects and freedom to shoot those who resisted.

Thailand's drug problem can be traced to neighboring Myanmar, where drug lords, dominated by the former rebel United Wa State Army, operate with impunity in border areas.

Granted virtual autonomy by Myanmar's military regime under a peace deal, the Wa produce millions of methamphetamine pills in factories close to the Thai border.

The drugs are smuggled by jungle trails into Thailand.

Last year, Thai police seized a record 95.4 million methamphetamine tablets, according to the Office of the Narcotics Control Bureau.

The Public Health Ministry estimates 3 million of Thailand's 63 million people regularly abuse drugs.

In big cities, including the capital, Bangkok, 420 miles south of Ban Pang Lao, drug dealers can blend in among street urchins and vendors.

But in villages, there are no secrets. "We could point to each house where the dealers and addicts lived," Sumalee said.

Rice farmer Supat Vintavud was the first person to bring methamphetamine, known in Thailand as "ya ba" or "crazy drug," to the village in 1997.

Supat, 35, said hill tribesmen he worked with on odd jobs introduced him to "ya ba" to give him the strength and endurance to drag large sacks full of ginger.

"But I kept needing more, and if I didn't take it, I was weak, tired and grumpy," said Supat, who works now as a community anti-drug worker.

For four years, he sold and used drugs. He could sell 200 pills a day and earn the equivalent of $250, a hefty sum in an area where most farmers make the equivalent of $100 to $200 a month.

Others soon took up the trade, and drug use spread in the village, fueling petty theft to pay for the pills. Young users took from their family rice stocks, and objects disappeared from the village temple and school, Sumalee said.

The community woke up to the seriousness of its problem after two villagers were murdered by rival dealers from another province and a 10-year-old was found using and delivering "ya ba" to buyers.

Turning the dealers in to police would have solved nothing, Sumalee said, because they would be set free after paying bribes and would mock the elders.

"I was arrested as I was about to give up dealing," said Narong Supanyo, a farmer who shriveled from 216 pounds to 140 pounds because of his addiction. "I had just sold my last two pills, when 10 or so police drove up the road."

He said that if he had paid a $75 bribe to the officers, they would have let him go immediately, but he had only $50.

Narong said he spent 48 days in jail, and still had to pay police $163 to be freed.

--AP 2003-11-09

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Several off-topic post have been removed and replies to them.

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i would say its much higher, i know just in the few surrounding villages of a dozen arrests, drugs is a capital punishment i think still in thailand, stay away from them and anyone dealing them if you can.

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A lot of work has to be done in the anti drug war.

Yes. It needs to be stopped.

There's no doubt, anyone stupid and weak enough to dabble in drugs are just climbing aboard the slippery slide to being a full addict !

So does everyone who drinks become an alcoholic?

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. I really don't understand people who, for petty political gain, oppose the war on drug.

You have admitted that you don't understand. That's a good start. Perhaps you should read some books?

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"over 300,000 addicts underwent drug rehabs" complete and total fantasy. All the Thai rehabs combined could accommodate maybe 1000 people a year. And for those, throwing up and praying is the treatment model. Thai people without money have almost no treatment options and the government has consistently declines foreign help and consulting about their addiction problem.

Agree completely.

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2% of the Thai population are drug addicts. speaks volumes

Counting alcohol as a drug the true percentage would be closer to 10%.

You fail to mention Cigarettes , Nicotine addiction kills millions per annum.

Your rite I failed to mention it.

Now that you bring it up I will have to raise the percentage of addicts to 20%

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i would submit that an addict is someone who uses a chemical adulterant (this would include alcohol or cigs) to the point where it has significant (ah yes, the wiggle room) negative impact on their life (could be personal, social, financial, emotional, all of the above) and continues to do so in spite of the continuing negative consequences.

of course, there are a lot of qualifiers in this statement that one can argue about, but you get the gist of the matter.

As for drug laws/rate/reports in other countries, that is all well and good, they are not thailand.

I wrote my master's thesis on an analysis of the dutch approach to drug addiction/treatment and i concluded that for a number of very good reasons, the (apparently) successful dutch model could not work in USA.... so again, culture and custom come into play when dealing with the local issues.

what we can see worldwide, is that decriminalization (not legalization) leads to lower criminal rates (duh), less use of govt jails (freeing up valuable dollars for "treatment" and other socially beneficial programs not even related to substance abuse), better socialization of addicts, better housing rates, better health outcomes, etc...

Personally, i see drug addiction as a public health problem, not strictly a medical one.... for many years i worked creating better alternatives for mentally ill, drug addicted, homeless people (in Berkeley, CA no less...).... thailand definitely has a long way to go and i wonder how they will get there...

Good for a laugh. According to you I would be a addict in the states because of the amount of money I spent on cigarets. A considerable sum of money that left me with out resources for day to day living in that society. Here in Thailand where the cost is so much lower I would not be a addict as the cost is negligible to me.

You are rite about.decriminalization. I believe that Portugal has done that to a large part and has considerable success with it. Even to the point of people using less than when it was illegal. I read a report once that said heron addiction was three parts one part the heron one part the needle and one part the life style.

Not that I agree but room for thought. I knew people who wuld shoot up whiskey.

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2% of the Thai population are drug addicts. speaks volumes

This is tiny compared to the number of addicts in the USA.

Australia and New Zealand have the highest rates of habitual marijuana use in the world, doesnt seem to affect our society too much. I believe that drugs are a medical problem not a legal one and should all be treated like alcohol and caffeine and nicotine.

And is habitual marijuana use legal in Australia and New Zealand then? Have you taken a look at your society - preferably without the marijuana?

Give Australia a break. They only figured out they were founded by English criminals about 20 years ago.giggle.gif

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Canada said:

Hi...I am not sure who you are but I don't think that promoting our upcoming Convention in this forum is appropriate.

NA in Thailand is full of narcissistic backstabbing bitches who do nothing towards our 5th tradition in this country....it's like we'll just delete tradition 5....

Having people come to check us out at this time in our development would be a huge embarrassment to us. We do barely anything to help ourselves and absolutely nothing to help Thai society.

Response from Balls,

The topic page of this forum is: NARCOTICS WAR

1.2 million Thais are addicted to drugs

THE NATION

And you are trying to tell me that this is not the ‘proper’ forum to mention the 5th Thailand Regional Convention, themed "MIRACLES HAPPEN" taking place in Pattaya, 17th to 19th February 2012?

I've been to a couple of these conventions back in the states (Detroit and Grand Rapids, MI., Phoenix, AZ) -they are great fun and give hope to all. What are you afraid of?

First off, let me say that it has been at least 18 years from my last NA or AA meeting. I do not agree with their ‘god oriented’ 12 twelve steps and traditions which you seem to be quite familiar with. That is not to say that these are not good programs for many, many people. Arguably, they are not the best programs, but hundreds of thousands of reformed addicts will disagree with me.

However, I will repeat myself, saying that the help and continuing support I receive from my old mates has kept me from shooting up or snorting everything from heroin, cocaine, LSD, black beauties Quaaludes, 100 proof rum or any dangerous drug. Anything I could get my hands on. NA saved my life!

And you “don't think that promoting our upcoming Convention in this forum is appropriate”?

And why did you not post your opinion on the forum itself? A bit shy are you? I’ll try to be civil about this but… you are out of your bloody mind!

AA and Na are already here in Thailand already. Does the “ the 5th Thailand Regional Convention” mean anything to you?

In fact, you sound as if you might be familiar with NA already! As you said (so anonymously), “NA in Thailand is full of narcissistic backstabbing bitches who do nothing…and “our upcoming Convention”.

I kind of wonder if these ‘bitches’ are Thai or Falang but it is up to YOU to get off of your duff and do something about it. Call them out by quoting your 12 and 12 or whatever but get your facts straight first! (See Post #6)

I agree with these forums post #6 that calls your bluff. In your post #7 you contradict yourself. Post #30 mentions NARCONON (?) but I believe he meant NARANON. This is for the family and friends who want to support their addicted loved one. Also read post #41.

You said “Thailand has many rehabs available for underfunded people. What they lack is the support after that. I say that this is what NA and AA are all about!

There is only one "throwing up and praying" model program. Wat Thamgrabok. Yes, I’ve read the book and am happy for the bloke who wrote it but still – aftermath support is tantamount!

IMHO, the 5th Thailand Regional (NA) Convention in Pattaya should be advertised and supported by all of the government officials who claim they want to “help” the problem in Thailand.

If you or your NA has a problem that you are not happy with - Take responsibility!

"Canada said:

Hi...I am not sure who you are but I don't think that promoting our upcoming Convention in this forum is appropriate.

NA in Thailand is full of narcissistic backstabbing bitches who do nothing towards our 5th tradition in this country....it's like we'll just delete tradition 5....

Having people come to check us out at this time in our development would be a huge embarrassment to us. We do barely anything to help ourselves and absolutely nothing to help Thai society."

Sounds like some one on the out side looking in.

I suppose there is some thing to it. I know of two people who used to go to it and no longer go. When pressed for why they point there finger at what others were doing or not doing that did not meet with their approval. As far as I can see they still seem to be happy drug free people today.

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