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Expat Insurance Poll

My health insurance (only for Expats 60 and over living in Thailand)   261 members have voted

  1. 2. Type of personal insurance

    • Life insurance
      1
    • Medical care
      42
    • Other (please state in post below)
      3
    • None
      24
  2. 3. What insurance company are you using

    • BUPA
      11
    • AXA
      2
    • LMG Pacific
      2
    • THI
      2
    • NZI
      1
    • Aviva
      0
    • My own (monthly savings to bank account)
      8
    • Other (please state in post below)
      19
    • None
      22
  3. 4. Coverage in Baht

    • Under 10 000
      2
    • 10 001 - 50 000
      1
    • 50 001 - 100 000
      1
    • 100 000 - 500 000
      10
    • 500 001 - 1 000 000
      2
    • exceeding 1 000 000
      28
    • None
      23

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

61 posts in this topic

The lack of interest in this thread as well as others that have been put up on the subject suggests to me that most expats are

1.Employed by a firm that offers them insurance (or have a wife in government service)

2.Young guys that are never going to get ill or

3.Old guys that can't afford insurance.

The problem is that these groups will never answer a poll like this.

I agree with Chiang Mai's remarks 100% but then again I like to gamble.

I fit into #1 and still answered it.

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ID: 32   Posted (edited)

Once again from NHS website:

The right to seek NHS-funded medical care does not extend beyond Europe.

However, if you want to have treatment outside Europe, such as in Canada or the USA, speak to your local health commissioner about an individual funding request (IFR). It is up to the commissioner to decide whether you can get treatment outside Europe. If this is something you want to do, contact your local PCT.
Edited by JLCrab

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ID: 33   Posted (edited)

Once again from NHS website:

The right to seek NHS-funded medical care does not extend beyond Europe.

However, if you want to have treatment outside Europe, such as in Canada or the USA, speak to your local health commissioner about an individual funding request (IFR). It is up to the commissioner to decide whether you can get treatment outside Europe. If this is something you want to do, contact your local PCT.

Agreed, I had taken it as understood that a UK citizen over the age of 65 living in Thailand, aka moi, would need to return to the UK for treatment.

When I wrote earlier that residency is not an issue I meant from the perspective of being allowed access to free NHS services. If a UK citizen under the age of 65 has been absent from the UK for more than six months there is a six month wait upon their return before free access is once again granted, over age 65 folks are exempt from that wait.

Edited by chiang mai

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The lack of interest in this thread as well as others that have been put up on the subject suggests to me that most expats are

1.Employed by a firm that offers them insurance (or have a wife in government service)

2.Young guys that are never going to get ill or

3.Old guys that can't afford insurance.

The problem is that these groups will never answer a poll like this.

I agree with Chiang Mai's remarks 100% but then again I like to gamble.

Add....

Guys who choose to self-insure

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ID: 35   Posted (edited)

Some treatments can be readily handled following a return to the UK. Some emergency situations cannot be so dealt with and would require extensive hospitalization and medical care before one could be fit to travel. Especially when one is past the age of 65.

Then, upon arrival in UK, it seems you go into the queue for your (maximum) 18 week non-emergency waiting time. Of course, if you had an emergency while(st) in Thailand, you wouldn't be able to return to UK anyway. Sounds like fun.

Edited by JLCrab

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THB 3,528,000 (at 49 per Pound) buys a lot of in country emergency health care where return visits can't be planned due to time constraints.

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ID: 37   Posted (edited)

To the poster at #4 the standardized Blue Cross Medicare supplement programs including the most expensive one 'K' offered in my state says the following:

Foreign Travel (not covered by Medicare)

Medically necessary emergency services beginning during the first 60 days of each trip outside the U.S.A.

From above: Time constraints you say? NHS defines life threatening emergencies as

  • loss of consciousness
  • acute confused state and fits that are not stopping
  • persistent, severe chest pain
  • breathing difficulties
  • severe bleeding that cannot be stopped

Even the hospitals in Thailand, although they will take an emergency patient, in fairly short order start to wonder from where comes the payment for this emergency patient. True -- 3+ million baht can go a long way for minor stuff - but at your age (and mine) and up that means one major event is covered for the rest of your life from that 3.5 million wad. BUPA platinum has coverages ranging from 2 million to 5 million per incident with no annual or lifetime limit.

And even for non-emergency but critical treatment, you're going to pass by all those excellent hospitals in Chiang Mai on the way to the airport for that long flight back to UK so you can go home to wait for your free non-emergency treatment in UK?

Edited by JLCrab

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ID: 38   Posted (edited)

To the poster at #4 the standardized Blue Cross Medicare supplement programs including the most expensive one 'K' offered in my state says the following:

Foreign Travel (not covered by Medicare)

Medically necessary emergency services beginning during the first 60 days of each trip outside the U.S.A.

True -- 3+ million baht can go a long way for minor stuff - but at your age (and mine) and up that means one major event is covered for the rest of your life from that 3.5 million wad. BUPA platinum has coverages ranging from 2 million to 5 million per incident with no annual or lifetime limit.

And even for non-emergency but critical treatment, you're going to pass by all those excellent hospitals in Chiang Mai on the way to the airport for that long flight back to UK so you can go home to wait for your free non-emergency treatment in UK?

It would depend on the scenario that's presented, low priority/high impact, high priority/low impact and that sort of thing. For a cardiac PCI I would do that in country, for a hip replacement (for example) I would also remain in country - both those treatments are routine mechanical processes from a medical standpoint. But given an unclear diagnosis of a condition, one that required knowledge/thinking expertise rather than mechanical expertise I would likely return to the UK. I have a condition at present that has been the subject of medical research/testing here in CM for the past year and we are no closer to a diagnosis, since it is not life threatening but is becomming serious, that could potentially be a candidate for a UK return.

I think the bottom line with all of this is that folks need to make an informed decision at the outset and model in all the possible scenario's, having made your choice whether to pay for insurance or not, be prepared to live with your decision and please, no whinging later if you made the wrong choice. For my part I would make the same decision again and in that respect I'm a satisfied customer of the no insurance group.

Edited by chiang mai

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ID: 39   Posted (edited)

So I will end this friendly chat by saying that as of today you are "a satisfied customer of the no insurance group." But in my humble opinion, you are ill prepared for someone choosing to live in Thailand for what might happen tomorrow and/or in the many years to come.

Edited by JLCrab

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ID: 40   Posted (edited)

And in addition to no whinging if it doesn't work out, a second aspect should be, no trying to convince people that only your own solution is the right one, because we're all different. (unless of course you happen to work in the inurance industry, in which case it's OK to try to scare the bejesus out of everyone, just to make them buy your product). biggrin.png

Edited by chiang mai

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ID: 41   Posted (edited)

We're all different. Yes. Except an overwhelming majority of the population would tend to agree that health insurance is a good and reasonably priced thing. I don't work in the insurance industry. I just studied math and probability.

November 29, 2012

Majority in U.S. Still Satisfied With Own Healthcare Costs

Medicare/Medicaid recipients increasingly satisfied; private insured less so

by Jeffrey M. Jones

PRINCETON, NJ -- Fifty-nine percent of Americans are satisfied with the total cost they pay for healthcare, precisely in the middle of the 54% to 64% range in satisfaction Gallup has found since 2001.

Edited by JLCrab

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Except an overwhelming majority of the population would tend to agree that health insurance is a good and reasonably priced thing.

In America perhaps you could find such sentiment, but I challenge you to produce evidence of the same sentiments in the UK.

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Right.

Record fall in 'NHS satisfaction'

By Nick Triggle

Health correspondent, BBC News

Public satisfaction with the NHS has dropped by a record amount, the British Social Attitudes Survey suggests.

The poll indicates satisfaction fell from 70% to 58% last year - the largest annual drop since it started in 1983.

And that plus your 3+ million baht lifetime treatment reserve in Thailand is what you choose to rely upon?

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Right.

Record fall in 'NHS satisfaction'

By Nick Triggle

Health correspondent, BBC News

Public satisfaction with the NHS has dropped by a record amount, the British Social Attitudes Survey suggests.

The poll indicates satisfaction fell from 70% to 58% last year - the largest annual drop since it started in 1983.

And that plus your 3+ million baht lifetime treatment reserve in Thailand is what you choose to rely upon?

And that has what to do with the your provision of proof that people think universally that health insurance is a great thing? Doubtless I could Google for an half an hour and find an article that talked about Americans disatisifaction with Blue Cross etc. and how the standards have fallen but thats not relevant to the debate either!

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A Medivac and 10 day stay in a Singapore Hospital cost my insurance company approximately US$50,000

I was covered personally by BUPA, but also through work - The Work Insurance handled the payments.

So, I can't say I'm ahead of the game, but I might not have quick access to such funds if required in such an emergency.

For My Wife and I (in our 30's - with BUPA) the insurance is not for the the small things we can afford, it's for the unforeseen and unpredictable major disaster which may or may not cross our paths.

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BANGKOK 26 July 2017 10:03
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