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mackes

Expat Insurance Poll

My health insurance (only for Expats 60 and over living in Thailand)  

261 members have voted

This poll is closed to new votes
  1. 2. Type of personal insurance

    • Life insurance
      1
    • Medical care
      42
    • Other (please state in post below)
      3
    • None
      24
  2. 3. What insurance company are you using

    • BUPA
      11
    • AXA
      2
    • LMG Pacific
      2
    • THI
      2
    • NZI
      1
    • Aviva
      0
    • My own (monthly savings to bank account)
      8
    • Other (please state in post below)
      19
    • None
      22
  3. 4. Coverage in Baht

    • Under 10 000
      2
    • 10 001 - 50 000
      1
    • 50 001 - 100 000
      1
    • 100 000 - 500 000
      10
    • 500 001 - 1 000 000
      2
    • exceeding 1 000 000
      28
    • None
      23


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A Medivac and 10 day stay in a Singapore Hospital cost my insurance company approximately US$50,000

I was covered personally by BUPA, but also through work - The Work Insurance handled the payments.

So, I can't say I'm ahead of the game, but I might not have quick access to such funds if required in such an emergency.

For My Wife and I (in our 30's - with BUPA) the insurance is not for the the small things we can afford, it's for the unforeseen and unpredictable major disaster which may or may not cross our paths.

I agree, the scenario is very different between 30 and 60 year olds, the need for the insurance and its cost are very different. Another aspect is that younger people might not be expected to have access to sufficient funds to cover such an emergency, as you point out, whilst many people of my age do. It's a horses for courses thing.

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Why does this page say

(48 member(s) have cast votes)

but at the same time it says

  1. Life insurance (0 votes [0.00%])
    Percentage of vote: 0.00%
  2. Medical care (1 votes [25.00%])
    Percentage of vote: 25.00%
  3. Other (please state in post below) (0 votes [0.00%])
    Percentage of vote: 0.00%
  4. None (3 votes [75.00%])

Am I missing something ?

Edited by jpinx

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A Medivac and 10 day stay in a Singapore Hospital cost my insurance company approximately US$50,000

I was covered personally by BUPA, but also through work - The Work Insurance handled the payments.

So, I can't say I'm ahead of the game, but I might not have quick access to such funds if required in such an emergency.

For My Wife and I (in our 30's - with BUPA) the insurance is not for the the small things we can afford, it's for the unforeseen and unpredictable major disaster which may or may not cross our paths.

I agree, the scenario is very different between 30 and 60 year olds, the need for the insurance and its cost are very different. Another aspect is that younger people might not be expected to have access to sufficient funds to cover such an emergency, as you point out, whilst many people of my age do. It's a horses for courses thing.

I'm not so sure.. I have access to sufficient funds... But not when I'm incapacitated and in dire need of a medivac jet and on the dark side of a remote island.

Of course, for those who do not travel to remote locations this is a non-issue.

But, I have a friend who was struck with a debilitating illness. A stay in Bumrungrad ran into excess of 4MB (she was there for a number of months).

Insurance is invaluable for times like this.

How many people really have access to large amounts of money at the drop of a hat ?

I can see the logic in a lot of older people not paying what may seem extortionate premiums for cover, however I do also suspect that there is an element of risk involved.

The alternative to adequate insurance may be to have money sitting in a bank (i.e. in excess of 1 MB and sellable assets) and someone trusted to oversee you are treated adequately and there are no delays due to potential questions of whether or not you have insurance or sufficient funds.

You may not be conscious... A little card that says BUPA (or any other) might make a lot of difference at the time...

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i have Medicare supplement insurance with blue Cross from the USA which covers out of USA medical as if it was covered by Medicare in the USA

really? what's your co-pay? premiums and deductible?

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A Medivac and 10 day stay in a Singapore Hospital cost my insurance company approximately US$50,000

I was covered personally by BUPA, but also through work - The Work Insurance handled the payments.

So, I can't say I'm ahead of the game, but I might not have quick access to such funds if required in such an emergency.

For My Wife and I (in our 30's - with BUPA) the insurance is not for the the small things we can afford, it's for the unforeseen and unpredictable major disaster which may or may not cross our paths.

I agree, the scenario is very different between 30 and 60 year olds, the need for the insurance and its cost are very different. Another aspect is that younger people might not be expected to have access to sufficient funds to cover such an emergency, as you point out, whilst many people of my age do. It's a horses for courses thing.

The alternative to adequate insurance may be to have money sitting in a bank (i.e. in excess of 1 MB and sellable assets) and someone trusted to oversee you are treated adequately and there are no delays due to potential questions of whether or not you have insurance or sufficient funds.

Maybe that's why I'm so relaxed about all of this, I do have substantial cash resources.

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I guess this is a point of disagreement: I and apparently the actuaries at BUPA Thailand do not think that a 3 million baht reserve is sufficient for someone past age 60 for the rest of their lives even in Thailand as BUPA Platinum would cover multiple such incidents per year with no lifetime limit.

And it took about 3 seconds not 30 minutes on Google to find what your fellow Brits think of NHS.

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I guess this is a point of disagreement: I and apparently the actuaries at BUPA Thailand do not think that a 3 million baht reserve is sufficient for someone past age 60 for the rest of their lives even in Thailand as BUPA Platinum would cover multiple such incidents per year with no lifetime limit.

And it took about 3 seconds not 30 minutes on Google to find what your fellow Brits think of NHS.

Nobody said the THB 3.5 mill was reserves, except you, the money is savings from 12 years of not paying insurance premiums but you knew that!

And why attack the NHS again, it has no relevance to this debate!!

Again, where's your proof that all people in countries other than north america love health insurance and think it's really a great idea? You and your country men are conditioned into having it, it must be galling to know there are others who don't need to do the same and/or who are in a position to pay directly for their health care needs and who don't have to pay insurance premiums.

Your posts are becomming tiresome and very troll like, you're not trying to debate the pro's and cons of buying health insurance but instead you're trying to denigrate those who chose not to hence I'm out of this thread. jerk.gif

  • Like 1

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To the poster at #4 the standardized Blue Cross Medicare supplement programs including the most expensive one 'K' offered in my state says the following:

Foreign Travel (not covered by Medicare)

Medically necessary emergency services beginning during the first 60 days of each trip outside the U.S.A.

From above: Time constraints you say? NHS defines life threatening emergencies as

  • loss of consciousness
  • acute confused state and fits that are not stopping
  • persistent, severe chest pain
  • breathing difficulties
  • severe bleeding that cannot be stopped

Even the hospitals in Thailand, although they will take an emergency patient, in fairly short order start to wonder from where comes the payment for this emergency patient. True -- 3+ million baht can go a long way for minor stuff - but at your age (and mine) and up that means one major event is covered for the rest of your life from that 3.5 million wad. BUPA platinum has coverages ranging from 2 million to 5 million per incident with no annual or lifetime limit.

And even for non-emergency but critical treatment, you're going to pass by all those excellent hospitals in Chiang Mai on the way to the airport for that long flight back to UK so you can go home to wait for your free non-emergency treatment in UK?

And I have to ask - what's your deductible, what's your co-pay for this healthcare?

Outside the U.S., my Aetna plan only covered 50% of the costs of such life-threatening health care (absolutely nothing for chronic condition treatments, serious but non-life-threatening illnesses or accidents like an emergency room visit for a broken arm or leg). A 50,000 Euro medical emergency in Europe - say a heart attack - would have cost me 25,000 Euro out of pocket. What a great insurance plan!

That's what my employer provided - with me sucking up the first $1000 - my deductible - and having nearly $100 deducted from the pay check each month for my 'fair share' of the premiums.

Every U.S. employer providing health insurance is playing games with coverages and costs. In case you haven't noticed, typical workers earnings are flat for nearly a decade now, while health care costs to the employee are continually climbing.

America's for-profit corporate health system, and insurance coverage provided by employers, is a dysfunctional, expensive way of providing health care. For the corporate health care industry and their shareholders/investors - its a great system. Oh, and if you are wealthy and can afford insurance payments. But if you are uninsured, poorly paid - like nearly all Walmart workers, restaurant and fast food workers, minimum wage employees, etc - YOUR HEALTH CARE SUCKS!!!

Edited by qdinthailand

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I guess this is a point of disagreement: I and apparently the actuaries at BUPA Thailand do not think that a 3 million baht reserve is sufficient for someone past age 60 for the rest of their lives even in Thailand as BUPA Platinum would cover multiple such incidents per year with no lifetime limit.

And it took about 3 seconds not 30 minutes on Google to find what your fellow Brits think of NHS.

Nobody said the THB 3.5 mill was reserves, except you, the money is savings from 12 years of not paying insurance premiums but you knew that!

And why attack the NHS again, it has no relevance to this debate!!

Again, where's your proof that all people in countries other than north america love health insurance and think it's really a great idea? You and your country men are conditioned into having it, it must be galling to know there are others who don't need to do the same and/or who are in a position to pay directly for their health care needs and who don't have to pay insurance premiums.

Your posts are becomming tiresome and very troll like, you're not trying to debate the pro's and cons of buying health insurance but instead you're trying to denigrate those who chose not to hence I'm out of this thread. jerk.gif

Let's not forget the 17% or so of Americans who do not have health insurance. My experience with insurance in the US is a mixed bag. Most I know do have it, but the hassles lately of taking advantage of it are getting worse and worse. Especially if you are on Medicare. Private insurance is usually much better, but very expensive. Usually some 600-900 USD per month and up.

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Even if it may not prove to be the least expensive way to go, if one buys insurance from one of the reputable insurers here in Thailand (when one is still eligible to do so) and is forthright in the application process, it certainly is the easiest way to go. No worrying about cash deposit or payments to the hospital at critical times, no winging it back to one's home country for free treatment, no looking at the clock and saying if I spend one more day in or out of the country my coverage is void, etc. And no worrying that one might turn out to be one of the very unfortunate very few who experience some catastrophic illness that might exceed one's cash reserves.

Wealthy people often buy the insurance and pay the premiums (or their business managers do) since it is such a trifle compared to their net worth and/or annual income and compared to the potential gain should the unfortunate occur. And they do so even in countries where healthcare is provided free by their government assuming they are willing to wait. Thailand hospitals have a very good inflow of patients from those 'free healthcare' countries as people in some cases are just not willing to wait or their condition makes such wait perilous.

Edited by JLCrab

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Being under 60, this does not apply, but the fact that I suspect many years of high-risk living may be catching up on me pushes me to think that perhaps I would break even (or better) if I had health insurance. I have had none for the last 20 years. I just forked out several thousand baht on lab tests today. I'm keen to learn who has the most economical, yet comprehensive coverage. If you are healthy, it is not at issue. I no longer am, it would seem.

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One thing you can do is to read the application form for any of the insurers in Thailand. They will ask many questions that will require detailed answers as to your medical history.

The application form for e.g. BUPA Thailand Platinum can be downloaded from here:

http://bupa.co.th/en/individuals/customer-care/form-download.aspx

  • Like 1

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It seems that most of the votes have been canceled, only 6 left.

Can everbody who polled please reenter their data?

You do this by deleting your vote and reenter it.

Edited by mackes

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BANGKOK 25 November 2017 18:31
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