Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

webfact

If Thais Don't Prepare Their Communication Skills Now, They Will Struggle When A E C Takes Off

Recommended Posts

Learning languages of region is critical
Wannapa Khaopa
The Nation

30204441-01_big.jpg

Experts warn if Thais don't prepare their communication skills now, they'll struggle when the AEC takes off

BANGKK: -- Learn the languages of our neighbouring countries today or be losers tomorrow. This is not an overstatement given that the Asean Economic Community (AEC) is going to create one economic community for citizens from 10 countries.


Although some Thais living along the borders can use their neighbours' languages, this is not enough to brace for human and business flows in the region, which will bring changes to Thailand and build strong relationships with people from other Asean nations.

Educators whose task is to help students and other Thai people enhance their foreign language skills urged Thais to start learning their neighbours' languages along with improving their English now, otherwise they would probably find themselves late.

"If we don't learn how to communicate with people from our neighbouring countries in English and in their local languages, we will lose many opportunities when more investments flow into the region, for instance an opportunity to be employed in a good position in a company in Asean," said Sudakarn Patamadilok, assistant to the president for international affairs and director of Naresuan University (NU) Language Centre. The centre offers students, the university's staff, individuals and other agencies short courses in Lao, Khmer, Burmese, Bahasa Indonesian and Tagalog.

"When compared to Myanmar workers in the engineering and architecture fields, who can speak Burmese, Thai and English, Thai workers can speak only Thai, hence there are more possibilities for the Myanmar ones to be employed," she explained.

She said they did not consider learning neighbours' languages as an urgent matter until they were going to be affected. "They don't prefer preparation, but if they wait until the AEC comes into effect and they are affected by changes, it will be too late for them to learn the neighbours' languages because they will be unable to learn the languages overnight while people in our neighbouring countries can speak Thai already. It takes time and needs continuous practice."

Assoc Prof Nuntaga Thawut, vice president for foreign affairs at Chandrakasem Rajabhat University, said Thais can work and stay comfortably in Thailand now, hence they do not feel it necessary to learn other Asean languages for the future.

Chandrakasem offers short courses in Khmer, Burmese and Vietnamese to its students and individuals.

"Although, many people near the border of Cambodia can speak Khmer, we've found that lots of young people don't speak this language as they don't see its importance, whereas young people in the countries sharing the borders with Thailand, like Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam can communicate in Thai. They watch Thai TV channels," said Phaichayon Janthaket, director of Prasatwittayakarn School in Surin that is near the border with Cambodia.

"This is a crisis as more people are expected to cross the border for jobs and businesses, but they won't understand each other enough, and this can lead to problems," he said.

The school teaches Khmer, Lao and Vietnamese to students, individuals and other agencies.

Usanee Watanapan, deputy director of the Bureau of Academic Affairs and Educational Standards at the Office of the Basic Education Commission (Obec), said not many students recognise the significance of learning the neighbours' languages, although many schools provided Burmese, Vietnamese, Khmer and Malay.

Eight of those schools in different regions also teach the neighbours' languages to interested people in the evening.

"Languages have immense power that can help you win the hearts of people from other countries, which is good for you to deal with them," Sudakarn said.

These educators are planning to reach out to more people. Nuntaga will provide free training to her students. Sudakarn said NU planned to offer more advanced courses and take some individuals and agencies to explore current situations or development in Myanmar. Phaichayon will send its teachers teaching Khmer to work near the border checkpoint to help people crossing the border with document translation and promote more activities for locals from both sides to do together to strengthen the relationship.

Usanee said Obec would try to convince more students to see the importance of learning foreign languages. Also, it would train 100 graduates in Burmese, Vietnamese, Khmer and Malay fields. They would have to study a Graduate Diploma Programme in Teaching Profession and study a short course in the country of the language they graduated in. "This is done in preparation for expansion of teaching the neighbouring languages at Obec schools."

She said a language learning app and software would be available for download by the end of this year. They would provide 900 often-used sentences in each of the 10 main languages of Asean countries, Mandarin, Korean and Japanese, so students and Thai people can learn the languages on their own through tablets and PCs.

nationlogo.jpg
-- The Nation 2013-04-22

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With Thais inferiority or is it superiority complex they will never master any of the above languages,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to hear that some language opportunities are being offered to Thai people. I'm sure most of them have been available for many years with just a small interest shown. Now, they are promoting the financial aspect "we will lose many opportunities when more investments flow into the region" - hopefully this will encourage more people to study and then use their new found knowledge not only for financial gain but to also start peace and friendship accords throughout the region

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A long story for an average Thai student, quickly told:

Go to school from Monday to Friday, in a lot if cases even Saturdays, and study there for more than 10 hours a day, learning a lot of subjects, and copying a lot of homework until midnight,...

... where is then the time to actually practice a language with such an enormous agenda per day which can last until midnight. Do you think the kids will have motivation to actually learn any language at all after exhausting rote learning agenda, ...

What kids learn at most Thai schools isn't language, but doctrine-rote-inspired-forcefully-propaganda-implemented grammar, pushed mercilessly into their sensitive brain cells that cause impairment of independent, critical thinking and on top of it makes a major number of students HATE language learning, resulting them to become extremely violent in many special cases...

... and may also refer that the rote spanking system aka beating kids with Bambi stick still exist in a lot of schools in Thailand, as I myself was once a casual volunteer English teacher at a primary and kindergarten facility and witnessed such scenarios ...

No, it is not necessarily GAMES or ACTION MOVIES, that encourage violence, but guess what,... it's the teachers themselves, as they beat their young, wild, but emotionally sensitive students from a young age on, and make their peers WITNESS violence from an early age on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thais need to focus on English. learning "other regional languages" such as Burmese is preposterous and foolhardy. Thais can't handle English yet - it's the lingua franca and they don't seem to make any progress with English.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is only one international language despite the plethora of languages globally. English is the only way for Thai's to get ahead, but then they would be able to see what the rest of the world really can offer and that would not be good for the Thai elites who control the country and the continuing repression of the Thai populace at large now would it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ask yourself what language is the Captain, first officer using when taking off from a international airport in the region,I say no more.coffee1.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Until the education system gets a complete over hall I dont see Thai's getting any better at English. There is a reason why Thai's are the worst English speakers in SEA, the education system is failing them. Until this changes, nothing else will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I agree with the general sentiment that having people with more language skills is better for communicating and creating harmony ..... can the Nation reporter (or someone online here) please tell me what the evidence is for these claims (as this is the basis for writing an article scaring people into taking an action):

"when more investments flow into the region, for instance an opportunity to be employed in a good position in a company in Asean", and "if they wait until the AEC comes into effect and they are affected by changes, it will be too late for them", and "This is a crisis as more people are expected to cross the border for jobs and businesses".........

No really ... can someone explain it ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with most of what has already said. English conversation needs to be the priority and leave the extensive grammar rote learning for later. Most Thai students are afraid to speak because they have not been given the chance to practice conversation skills. A lot of Thai Teachers I know can not speak English very well. I am sorry to say that the Thai Education system does not have enough time, money, or desire to make the necessary change in time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last month I was leaving Mae Sai (Thailand) for Tachilek (Burma) severely limping with a very bad knee and supported by a walking stick.

The Thai border guard said 'what happen you nee'

The Burmese border guard said 'good morning sir, what happened to your knee'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why should Thai's learn another AEC language? I expect many Thai's feel "those other AEC" countries should learn Thai in order to communicate with the Hub Country of AEC.blink.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ask yourself what language is the Captain, first officer using when taking off from a international airport in the region,I say no more.:coffee1:

Yeah yeah native English speaking people and other languages...I say no more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to hear that some language opportunities are being offered to Thai people. I'm sure most of them have been available for many years with just a small interest shown. Now, they are promoting the financial aspect "we will lose many opportunities when more investments flow into the region" - hopefully this will encourage more people to study and then use their new found knowledge not only for financial gain but to also start peace and friendship accords throughout the region

@BrianCR: Is that a POSITIVE post I see here? Be careful, you may get kicked off...

Well done. Nice post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 16 January 2018 22:09
Sponsors
×