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Thai Buddhist Chanting

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lungmi    547

The book I mentioned above was the base of the marital contract with my wife, the ethic concordance of our life together.

1. Take care of your wife or husband.

2. Take care of your mother and father when they are weak.

3. Give to your children the best education up to their potential.

4.You are a free woman and I am free man. We are not jealous, we trust the Buddha Teaching.

We gave a lot of teaching to thai/farang couples, some couple understood easyly, most not.

One couple will send their twins during the next school holidays to Wat Phatam, to learn the law of nature by doing.

Give food to dogs and to cats, not scare snakes and scorpions etc.

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lungmi    547

Vasalasutthapatha

The disccourse on Outcast.

Temiyagatha

The advantages of friendship.

He who maintains genuine friendship (truthfullness and loyalty towards friends) will, whenever he goes far out of his home-

receive abundant hospitality. Many others will be benefited through him.

He who maintains genuine friendship will, whatever country , village or town he visits, be honoured.

------------------------

My experience after 21 tears of Thailand: Old science works.

Edited by lungmi

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lungmi    547

Temiyagatha sutta.

I gave the same book to my English student (a Thai) before he took his job in Wisconsin with special advertisement for this sutta. When he came back he only said: I have confidence to the Teaching of the Buddha.

In Wisconsin I met friends of all countries and all colours. The Buddha's Teaching is Truth and you open me the door.

I answer: A little bit English and a good book, the important work was made by yourself.

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lungmi    547

Update:

The Happy New Year ceremonies in the Wat.

My wife disapeared.

I look with members of the family in the Wat.

Family members stay. I look for my wife.

She was at home, chanting in her room, no books, her Pali came from heart--- with understanding the meaning.

The book.I mentioned above is a jewel for all who wants to go to deeper understanding.

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khaowong1    860
Pali/English text and MP3 files are available at BuddhaSasana.

Very interesting website, hadn't come across it before. Nice encapsulated explanations of Theravada Buddhism as well. The one by Maung Kyauk Seinn was especially informative.

The chanting section reminded me that Thammayut monks at Wat Bowon once told me that in Thailand there is a difference between what monks in the Thammayut sect chant and what monks in the Mahanikai sect chant. I didn't hear what the differences were, but got the impression it was not the words that differed but the selection of verses for morning, evening and fortnightly chanting.

Yes, this is true... I have two chanting books.. one I got at Wat Saket in Bangkok, Mahanikai, one I got from Wat Pah Nanachat, Thammayut. Their selections for morning and evening are different, but they kind of blend in together somewhere..

If your in Bangkok, Wat Saket has a really good chanting book. Of course if your in upper Isaan, so does Wat Pah Nanachat..

Wat Pah Nanachat will mail you a book if you write and ask them..

Here's the problem with farangs at Thai temples. The abbot or no.#2 monk, usually sets the chants to be chanted both morning and evening, Each temple will vary on what chants they use. They don't tell you in advance or during, you just have to kind of fumble around in your book till you find the correct one. If you go to one temple all the time, you mark the pages and follow along pretty easily.. You go to another temple and they change them up on you.. after awhile though, you kind of get a feeling for them. My temple in Lopburi, uses the same chants in the morning every day, and the same chants in the evening everyday. I know where they are going by memory.. I go to another temple for a few days, and they change them up on me.. but I've been a monk long enough now that I can pretty much figure out where they are in the book.

It gets confusing, but no matter where you are, sooner or later, they will come back to some chants you know or are familiar with..

Someone with more smarts than me, needs to take the little yellow Thai chanting book, and copy it exactly into a romanized version for us who can't read Thai. Wishful thinking.

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khaowong1    860

Does anyone know where online I could find what I need to say for the ordination ceremony?

There are actually two different ceremonies...

You need to find out which one you will use first.

You can pick up which ever one you need at several temples in Bangkok.

Wat Mahathat section 5

Wat Saket, the golden mount

Wat Bowon

Every chanting book I have ever read, has the ordination ceremony in them.

It's nice to know and understand the ordination ceremony, but what usually happens, not always, but usually,

Someone, called the Acariya, will stand next to you and have you repeat the chants after him.

I wasn't told this, so I spent approx. 3 weeks living at the temple, learning the ordination chant by heart.

When I ordained, I had the Acariya standing next to me, and I was pleasantly surprised.

They were surprised also, that I knew them.. lot's of smile all around..

Good Luck...

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hookedondhamma    195

The yellow book i finished transcribing into correctly romanized pali last year. But there were complications in my getting it available to a wider audience. Caution tells me not to even think about releasing it via email due to the problems that can spring from it.

As for chanting differences, Mahan. uses Thai sounds for their chanting,; ex Put-tho, twee (for the sound of the t or th with the dot under it) while there. uses Indian pronunciation, Bud-dho, along with labial and dental, nasal sounds etc. Of course many monks here in both sects use Thai sounds, but there are a few around who still follow the original pronunciation before the before Thai language pronunciation shift came into occurrence.

A monk who ordained new in the there. Sect told me he prefers the Maha. pronunciation, as the there. makes him feel uneasy.

Some case endings are also switched when chanting between the two sects, and i noticed that when visiting maha. Temples, they chant in stopped form, while there. Chant without pauses - but this varies as well. While in Chiang Mai last year I had the opportunity to go and hear a very respectes monk chant the abhidhamma matrix, and I was lucky to have a recorder there as it was completely uknown to my ears. I believe it was a maha. Temple, though he was trained in Lanna culture so the difference was astounding.

Edited by hookedondhamma

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khaowong1    860

The yellow book i finished transcribing into correctly romanized pali last year. But there were complications in my getting it available to a wider audience. Caution tells me not to even think about releasing it via email due to the problems that can spring from it.

As for chanting differences, Mahan. uses Thai sounds for their chanting,; ex Put-tho, twee (for the sound of the t or th with the dot under it) while there. uses Indian pronunciation, Bud-dho, along with labial and dental, nasal sounds etc. Of course many monks here in both sects use Thai sounds, but there are a few around who still follow the original pronunciation before the before Thai language pronunciation shift came into occurrence.

A monk who ordained new in the there. Sect told me he prefers the Maha. pronunciation, as the there. makes him feel uneasy.

Some case endings are also switched when chanting between the two sects, and i noticed that when visiting maha. Temples, they chant in stopped form, while there. Chant without pauses - but this varies as well. While in Chiang Mai last year I had the opportunity to go and hear a very respectes monk chant the abhidhamma matrix, and I was lucky to have a recorder there as it was completely uknown to my ears. I believe it was a maha. Temple, though he was trained in Lanna culture so the difference was astounding.

The temple I am staying at now, they chant without pauses.. My temple in Lopburi, pause between chants, which gives me a chance to find where their at in my chanting book.. I like pauses better. biggrin.png It's amazing to me, how many monks, even if they have only been monks for a couple of years, memorize all these chants... I probably only have memorized 12 chants or so and I've been a monk going on 5 years. Maybe I'm lazy.. yes, I am lazy. laugh.png

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khaowong1    860

The yellow book i finished transcribing into correctly romanized pali last year. But there were complications in my getting it available to a wider audience. Caution tells me not to even think about releasing it via email due to the problems that can spring from it.

As for chanting differences, Mahan. uses Thai sounds for their chanting,; ex Put-tho, twee (for the sound of the t or th with the dot under it) while there. uses Indian pronunciation, Bud-dho, along with labial and dental, nasal sounds etc. Of course many monks here in both sects use Thai sounds, but there are a few around who still follow the original pronunciation before the before Thai language pronunciation shift came into occurrence.

A monk who ordained new in the there. Sect told me he prefers the Maha. pronunciation, as the there. makes him feel uneasy.

Some case endings are also switched when chanting between the two sects, and i noticed that when visiting maha. Temples, they chant in stopped form, while there. Chant without pauses - but this varies as well. While in Chiang Mai last year I had the opportunity to go and hear a very respectes monk chant the abhidhamma matrix, and I was lucky to have a recorder there as it was completely uknown to my ears. I believe it was a maha. Temple, though he was trained in Lanna culture so the difference was astounding.

I would be very interested in your book.. do you need some help financially getting it printed?

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hookedondhamma    195

The yellow book i finished transcribing into correctly romanized pali last year. But there were complications in my getting it available to a wider audience. Caution tells me not to even think about releasing it via email due to the problems that can spring from it.

As for chanting differences, Mahan. uses Thai sounds for their chanting,; ex Put-tho, twee (for the sound of the t or th with the dot under it) while there. uses Indian pronunciation, Bud-dho, along with labial and dental, nasal sounds etc. Of course many monks here in both sects use Thai sounds, but there are a few around who still follow the original pronunciation before the before Thai language pronunciation shift came into occurrence.

A monk who ordained new in the there. Sect told me he prefers the Maha. pronunciation, as the there. makes him feel uneasy.

Some case endings are also switched when chanting between the two sects, and i noticed that when visiting maha. Temples, they chant in stopped form, while there. Chant without pauses - but this varies as well. While in Chiang Mai last year I had the opportunity to go and hear a very respectes monk chant the abhidhamma matrix, and I was lucky to have a recorder there as it was completely uknown to my ears. I believe it was a maha. Temple, though he was trained in Lanna culture so the difference was astounding.

I would be very interested in your book.. do you need some help financially getting it printed?

I am currently on my way to loei but will email when i can get to a computer .

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khaowong1    860

Does anyone know where online I could find what I need to say for the ordination ceremony?

ordination-procedure.pdf

That's a good book, but it's very hard for a novice to understand and pronounce. If you can get to Bangkok, go to Wat Saket or Wat Mahathat and ask for their book.. Like I said before, there are two ordination ceremonies.. you have to know which one the temple you are ordaining at uses.

If your in Isaan, go to Wat Pah Nanachat and ask them for a book. If your in Chiang Mai.. try to get in touch with FabiaFred.. He will help you.. good luck.

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evanson    10

An MP3 file of the chanting would be useful.

You can download it to MP3 from Youtube. There are several external download options.

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sabaijai    344

The yellow book i finished transcribing into correctly romanized pali last year. But there were complications in my getting it available to a wider audience. Caution tells me not to even think about releasing it via email due to the problems that can spring from it.

As for chanting differences, Mahan. uses Thai sounds for their chanting,; ex Put-tho, twee (for the sound of the t or th with the dot under it) while there. uses Indian pronunciation, Bud-dho, along with labial and dental, nasal sounds etc. Of course many monks here in both sects use Thai sounds, but there are a few around who still follow the original pronunciation before the before Thai language pronunciation shift came into occurrence.

A monk who ordained new in the there. Sect told me he prefers the Maha. pronunciation, as the there. makes him feel uneasy.

Some case endings are also switched when chanting between the two sects, and i noticed that when visiting maha. Temples, they chant in stopped form, while there. Chant without pauses - but this varies as well. While in Chiang Mai last year I had the opportunity to go and hear a very respectes monk chant the abhidhamma matrix, and I was lucky to have a recorder there as it was completely uknown to my ears. I believe it was a maha. Temple, though he was trained in Lanna culture so the difference was astounding.

By "ther/there" you're referring to Thammayut Nikai, correct? At the Thammayut monasteries I've visited in Thailand the resident monks chanted using the usual Thai pronunciation. I didn't realise there were some that tried to cleave more closely to the (perceived) Pali pronunciation..

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BANGKOK 21 September 2017 22:44
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