Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

wym

Pronouncing "papaya"

36 posts in this topic

Mahlahgaw

I hear it pronounced with a glottal stop at the very end.

Does that happen even when there is no instance of the Thai letter explicitly indicating a stop?

Or is it just very short?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never heard the glottal myself, just a short vowel. just my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pa Pa Ya

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

Round here anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pa Pa Ya

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

Round here anyway.

Agreed + 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pa Pa Ya

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

Round here anyway.

I think the OP is referring to the Thai word for papaya, malagaw though.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pa Pa Ya

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

Round here anyway.

I think the OP is referring to the Thai word for papaya, malagaw though.

The topic title is "Pronouncing papaya"

Malagaw is a city in Spain where wanabe posh people go for holidays wink.png

Yes, but, what is the sub-forum title?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pa Pa Ya

All short vowels, maybe aspirate the last one.

Round here anyway.

I think the OP is referring to the Thai word for papaya, malagaw though.

The topic title is "Pronouncing papaya"

Malagaw is a city in Spain where wanabe posh people go for holidays wink.png

Papaya is malagaw in Thai http://thai-language.com/id/134728

If you read the original post properly you will see it begins with that word.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some being clever some not so much, afraid I can't tell the difference. Maybe someone could answer my question?

Does the Thai word มะละกอ have a glottal stop at the end of its pronunciation?

I have no idea about the written aspect and that's a secondary question if anyone wants to address that.

Thanks in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some being clever some not so much, afraid I can't tell the difference. Maybe someone could answer my question?

Does the Thai word มะละกอ have a glottal stop at the end of its pronunciation?

I have no idea about the written aspect and that's a secondary question if anyone wants to address that.

Thanks in advance.

If you look at the spelling, มะละกอ, you will see it is not a glottal stop, though easy to mistake it as such because that final "vowel" is a short vowel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some being clever some not so much, afraid I can't tell the difference. Maybe someone could answer my question?

Does the Thai word มะละกอ have a glottal stop at the end of its pronunciation?

I have no idea about the written aspect and that's a secondary question if anyone wants to address that.

Thanks in advance.

If you look at the spelling, มะละกอ, you will see it is not a glottal stop, though easy to mistake it as such because that final "vowel" is a short vowel.

The final vowel is actually long (but yes, no glottal stop). (If it were short a short vowel then there would be a glottal stop.)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, maybe I was mis-hearing it short at the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard this word pronounced differently in different areas. It seems to range from "ma la gaw" to "ma la gor". This is not a glottal stop. Glottal stops occur when there is a short vowel ending, not followed by any consonant.For example in the word 'island' เกาะ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glottal stops occur when there is a short vowel ending, not followed by any consonant.For example in the word 'island' เกาะ.

That is unclear or incorrect (not sure which).

For all syllables ending in a written short vowel there is a terminal glottal stop. So, for example, in มะละกอ there are two glottal stops - after ma and after la.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For all syllables ending in a written short vowel there is a terminal glottal stop. So, for example, in มะละกอ there are two glottal stops - after ma and after la.

That's true for a careful pronunciation, but word internally these syllable-final glottal stops are usually dropped in normal speech. In the case of มะละกอ, the first seems to be more likely to be preserved. This isn't surprising given that the มะ in the names of fruit is a shortening of หมาก.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 25 July 2017 07:38
Sponsors