swbailey

Jellyfish - The Facts

84 posts in this topic

Best advice is when swimming in the sea always cover up.

If you swin in the sea every day eventually you will be stung by a jellyfish. Depending on the type of jelly fish you could have mild or severe symptoms.

A sting from the wrong kind of jelly fish can kill.

Its pointless describing the very dangerous ones as we have seen from this post you rarely see what stings you.

When I learnt to dive I would go in with only shorts. I got a sting from a unseen JF around my ankle which didn't heal for months , I still have the scar years later.

Now when i want to dive or snorkel I completely cover up. Wet suit , gloves , hood and booties. The only part of my skin that is exposed are my lips and cheeks and I still get stung (petroleum jelly helps as a protective barrier).

If I want to swim I do so in a pool. If I really needed to swim in the sea daily I would get one of those Lycra skins.

If I took children into the seas I would insist on them being covered up.

Cheers

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Nasty wounds!

Never saw anything like it!

There was a thread on Jellyfish around already - vinegar yes, but if i recall correctly "hot water"...?

There's differences of opinion on the effectiveness of hot water as a treatment.

I spoke with a Doctor about this. His take was that for the water to have any effect on the toxins from the JF it would have to be hot enough to start breaking down the proteins in the toxin. The offset of that would be it would have to be hot enough to break down the proteins in the tissue affected.

I'm not sure either way.

Cheers

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I spoke with a Doctor about this. His take was that for the water to have any effect on the toxins from the JF it would have to be hot enough to start breaking down the proteins in the toxin. The offset of that would be it would have to be hot enough to break down the proteins in the tissue affected.

I'm not sure either way.

Cheers

So there was something about it... think it's the "new Australian" way...believe it's somewhere in the threads i've linked to.. just don't have the time right now!

And the "Pak Boong Talay" (Beach-Sea Morning Glory) seems to be a local remedy... but don't know exactly how to apply/ make use of it..

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As requested, the topic is now pinned. We need to make some more pinned topics as well. Please

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As requested, the topic is now pinned. We need to make some more pinned topics as well. Please

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As requested, the topic is now pinned. We need to make some more pinned topics as well. Please

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As requested, the topic is now pinned. We need to make some more pinned topics as well. Please PM me for ideas on restaurants, activities around Hua Hin and Cha Am, etc.

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Surely this post caters to all seaside resorts and nut just Hua Hin.

If it should be pinned anywhere it should be pinned in the Health section.

Cheers

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If you don't have a wetsuit, pantyhose will protect your lower body and a long sleeve T-shirt your upper body.

Right now there are heaps of them off Cha Am, the fishermen are scooping them up with nets, must be catching 1,000's from the look of it.

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Right now there are heaps of them off Cha Am, the fishermen are scooping them up with nets, must be catching 1,000's from the look of it.

Heaps of pantyhose? :o So that's where they come from. Kinda like a sea sponge, huh? :D

I hope the fisherman can get good prices at market. :D

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And the "Pak Boong Talay" (Beach-Sea Morning Glory) seems to be a local remedy... but don't know exactly how to apply/ make use of it..

The way the locals showed me, it's used more to prevent stings and "sea lice" than as a treatment. They crush the leaves by rolling it between their palms then wipe it on the body .. especially around they eyes and face.

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The large jelly fish only give a mild sting. Put a little ammonia on it for relief. However some people are allergic to jellyfish stings and can get very ill from them. The very small Portuguese man-o-war is terrible. It is iridescent blue with long tentacles. The pain is very severe so you must get medical treatment, usually anti histamine injections. Fortunately quite rare but I have seen the odd one washed up on the beach. Frankly I don't like swimming when there are a lot of jelly fish about. I prefer my pool

To regular visitors/residents to the beaches of Hua Hin.

Hi

I have browsed the forum to look for facts about Jellyfish. Its all very ancedotal and there is nothing about treating stings.

It would appear that you could spot Jellyfish all year round, but they only come near shore during rainy season, or times when it rains in dry season. Is this true.

Are there different types - stingers and non-stingers.

What should one have ready in the hotel or apartment if you are stung by a jellyfish. No point going out to buy the vinegar if you have already been stung.

If you were to swim in the sea every day for 1 hour what are the percentage chance of been stung during the rainy season. (and same question during the dry season).

What are the dangers of not treating a jellyfish sting. Ive read stories of scars. Are they true.

What are the dangers for a child of 2 years been stung by a jellyfish.

Have they ever considered nets in certain areas of Hua Hin.

Ive seen mention that Sai Noi is the nicest beach without jet-ski and jellyfish. Is this true. Where is Sai Noi (sorry if I have now advertised Sai Noi), but I dont think circulation of this topic will be huge.

Thank you to anyone who takes time to add a few facts about jellyfish.

Blamamber.

I have lived in Jamaica where Jelly fish appeared for a couple of months every year, so yes they are or can be seasonal, and yes there are very many different types of Jelly fish, and the first thing to do is to identify the level of danger the local type offers, as some are indeed very deadly like the box jelly fish in Northern Queensland you would be very foolish indeed to swim in the sea at times when they are about, because you are most likely a dead man if you get stung by one of those.

Others do not hurt too much , in Jamaica there was one about the size of a dinner plate and about 3" thick that did not have very long tentacles and kind of pulsated, that did not sting too badly the locals said they had been 'scratched' by it when they got stung, then there was also what they called the portugese man of war that tended to be very small a bit like an ice cream cone with sometimes quite long tentacles coming out the end. This one was a nightmare and I speak from experience of being stung on two occasions by it.

The skin reddens up and has small blisters presumebaly where the tentacles deposited the poison, in such a way that it does get into the body, this process is greatly enhanced if you scratch the afflicted area, but as you have a great compulsion to do so you probably will and assist the flow of the venom into the blood stream. It takes about an hour or more for the venom to start affecting you big time spreading from the bite site but, when it does it is extremely unpleasant and it is easy to think you could die in the near future ( I am sure some people do!) as the venom seems to visit each organ one by one and you can feel them being affected and you wonder when it will stop, all this time you really want to scratch the bite site and feel delirious and very hot and cold and itchy all over, all this last 2-3 hrs and then you start to come down and if it happenned on your morning swim by the afternoon you more or less feel back to normal.

I guess you're reaction will be governed by your fitness and personal reaction to the venom.

It is true that vinegar is supposed to cause the deposited venom to be washed from the skin it also true that in emergency urine has the same effect. I don't think it will altogether stop the process I described above but it may alleviate it, like you say you don't usually have vinegar to hand.

There are antidotes to jelly fish stings and the local hospital in an afflicted area should keep it in stock, so you could check this position in your area and maybe campaign for some if not available , if it is available the first thing you should do on being stung is go to hospital and get an injection.

Some jelly fish even small ones can have very long (6 feet or more) tentacles and it is possible to get wrapped up in them and be very badly stung indeed.

I used to swim a long way every morning, and you could not see these men of war all the time, they kind of fade in and out of view with the angle of the light in the water and some were very small about the size of a small pear, so I would not bank on avoiding them.

If they are about I would always now swim with a long sleeve T shirt on as you tend to swim into them shoulder/arm first.

I do however believe that avoiding being bitten when they are expected by not swimming is the sensible answer.

My ten bobs worth :o

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