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BANGKOK 17 November 2018 07:06
hermespan

Burma's strong and weak points compared to Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos?

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10 hours ago, watcharacters said:

 

 

The Great Frontier?

 

 

Maybe in 2014 when the post you responded to was written. On the oil and gas exploration side, the gild is off the lily but that's a global thing dictated by the US's success in fracking. Interesting to read subsequent posts that banking and non-energy related businesses also appear to be hedging their bets though. The infrastructure is woefully inadequate despite the Chinese funding the 'motorway' from Yangon to Napyidaw but there's millions of Chinese-made solar panels in just about every bamboo hut so they can watch Chinese-made satellite TV while watching the cars go by.

 

The comment was made that Myanmar has the benefit of being a multi-ethnic nation. With the recent excesses with regard to the Rohingya and the quietly ongoing unrest with the minority armies in the Kachin and other northern states, beyond moving the capital further north, there haven't been any great strides in making The Union of Myanmar anything like a union. There's still a disconnect despite having elections and having an intramural, seated parliament headed by a self-admitted de facto leader with popular appeal and little else.

 

Sorry for the double post earlier. The ancient ipStar system we have on site can't keep up.

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On 4/22/2018 at 9:01 PM, NanLaew said:

Despite a boom in offshore oil and gas exploration around 2015 and a coincident but smaller surge of the same work onshore, very few E&P companies retain an office and full-time expat staff in Yangon. A lot of explorationists involved with Myanmar tend to run their 'Burma desk' out of another, regional office such as KL or Singapore. Not sure if it's a cost issue, a visa and WP issue or a board and lodging issue but the collapse in global oil prices probably didn't help. I have been involved with onshore exploration here since the new year and the whole permitting process is the biggest time waster as noted earlier. The excessively long time to get the top-level government permission is only matched by the excruciatingly long time it takes for such permissions to trickle down to regional, provincial and municipal levels. Both projects started about 6 months late and thus remain uncompleted despite the initial approvals being obtained almost a year earlier. I have heard from those involved with similar ventures over the past 2-3 years that this is par for the course.

 

Compared with my +12 years in the same game in Vietnam where they also have an overreaching bureaucracy with approvals coming from the PM's office, the trickle down is a lot faster... unless you time things very badly and lose traction due to Tet. Vietnam has a tad more dynamism.

 

I hope to add Laos to my portfolio before I hang up my boots but the last thrash for oil in Savanakhet drilled a duster about 7 years ago and there's been little uptake since. Bit of a bugger being land-locked too.

In Laos many companies especially multinationals are gradually starting to rid themselves of expensive farang staff in favor of locals and citizens of neighboring countries. Can't really blame them.

 

If you're in O&G Myanmar is really where you want to go, not Laos.

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On 4/23/2018 at 10:35 AM, NanLaew said:

Maybe in 2014 when the post you responded to was written. On the oil and gas exploration side, the gild is off the lily but that's a global thing dictated by the US's success in fracking. Interesting to read subsequent posts that banking and non-energy related businesses also appear to be hedging their bets though. The infrastructure is woefully inadequate despite the Chinese funding the 'motorway' from Yangon to Napyidaw but there's millions of Chinese-made solar panels in just about every bamboo hut so they can watch Chinese-made satellite TV while watching the cars go by.

 

The comment was made that Myanmar has the benefit of being a multi-ethnic nation. With the recent excesses with regard to the Rohingya and the quietly ongoing unrest with the minority armies in the Kachin and other northern states, beyond moving the capital further north, there haven't been any great strides in making The Union of Myanmar anything like a union. There's still a disconnect despite having elections and having an intramural, seated parliament headed by a self-admitted de facto leader with popular appeal and little else.

 

Sorry for the double post earlier. The ancient ipStar system we have on site can't keep up.

I thought it was a local company linked to the drug smuggling trade from Shan State that financed the Yangon to Naypyidaw expressway, not a Chinese one. Ethnic Chinese yes, the company has an office in Hong Kong.

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