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lostinisaan

How Dangerous Are These Scorpions And What's Best If One Stung You?

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You should learn from this, it's always dangerous to move stones, debris, dry wood piles or old wood logs. In most case, there are scorpions nesting underneath. A bite will take you from a very nasty painful sting that you will fell weeks later, to a certain death when left untreated for 20 minutes.

in the scrub, torn, and wild countryside, whether it's been south Tennesee or south Eesaan, i ve adepted the habit to let my eyes scan the ground while I walk.

The risk is foreseeable. The deeper in the bush you are, the more dangerous your environment becomes.

I am surprised you mention you don't kill them . . . if i find any of them around the house, I will kill them instantly. They are not by far such an endangered species as we humans are !

You should mind the country side at all, stay in your "safe" cities... The black scorpions are quite harmless, not as poisonous as their smaller brothers and by far less dangerous than the Vietnamese centipede. Thais in my surroundings usually don't care about the black scorpions, but if somebody wants to get rid of them, then they eat them...

There are few accidents with snakes or scorpions on the country side, worst are encounters with the above mentioned Vietnamese centipedes, the only insect I know which actively goes forward attacking you... very scary, but no reason to kill any wildlife around my house and village. Give nature a chance (btw... I kill the mentioned centipedes, these fellows I don't need/want around my house. My neighbours will preserve the beast in a bottle of LaoKao and enjoy this "medicine" after three to four months. Cheers)

Fatfather

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You should learn from this, it's always dangerous to move stones, debris, dry wood piles or old wood logs. In most case, there are scorpions nesting underneath. A bite will take you from a very nasty painful sting that you will fell weeks later, to a certain death when left untreated for 20 minutes.

in the scrub, torn, and wild countryside, whether it's been south Tennesee or south Eesaan, i ve adepted the habit to let my eyes scan the ground while I walk.

The risk is foreseeable. The deeper in the bush you are, the more dangerous your environment becomes.

I am surprised you mention you don't kill them . . . if i find any of them around the house, I will kill them instantly. They are not by far such an endangered species as we humans are !

Moving stones, I have already seen centipedes, which ran away, 10 cms from me : now, I put gloves and boots

as for scorpions, I have read than in Thailand they are not very dangerous, but avoid them anyway

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Thanks, mate. Thought they'd sting?. Are you still alive? coffee1.gif

A lot more than that "creepy crawly". Was a few years ago in Surin. It attached itself to my bedding when it was outside drying after washing. Not the nicest midnight surprise I've had in bed!
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I have been stung by the light brown ones and Father in law gave me a leaf to rub on the sting. Absolutely no problem - less painful than a wasp sting and less irritating than Mosquito bite.

I did unearth this dark blue scorpion whilst I carefully moved some debris. Nobody had seen one like this. It looks dangerous!?!? (got to figure out how to upload an image - sorry). it was dark blue and about 125mm in length

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I have been stung by the light brown ones and Father in law gave me a leaf to rub on the sting. Absolutely no problem - less painful than a wasp sting and less irritating than Mosquito bite.

I did unearth this dark blue scorpion whilst I carefully moved some debris. Nobody had seen one like this. It looks dangerous!?!? (got to figure out how to upload an image - sorry). it was dark blue and about 125mm in length

Figured it out here is the image:-

post-55459-0-74348100-1430280611_thumb.j

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Lostinisaan, they have a lot less powerful venom than the local millipedes. Those are worth watching out for (having been bitten twice!)

milipedes aren't venomous. centipedes are.

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Have also been stung by the small brown ones.

Made me jump, my MIL laughed at me and made me feel like a right wimp.

Edited by soihok
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Wife says: the big black ones are by no means lethal.

When I see the quite relaxed reaction of my family when they see one this seems plausible.

And also the after pain seems much less bad than the much feared centipedes.

Those buggers are much more dangerous.

Edited by KhunBENQ
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Not sure about the one in the photo but all in our family at the farm have been bitten by the browny/black scorpions a few times. It stings for about 24 - 30 hours but no problems after that. They are about 40 - 50 mm long. Not sure about the bigger, black ones that you find under water tanks, logs etc

40- 50 mm "long"?

These guys who came for a visit were about ( at least) 150 mm long. Without the dangerous tail. I like big spiders and spiders look like pets to me, comparing to these creatures.

This is what a "brown widow spider" can do to you (in Thailand)

attachicon.gifImageUploadedByThaivisa Connect1430281335.363730.jpg

The brown widow is thought by some researchers to originate in South Africa. The origin of this species is uncertain, as specimens were discovered in both Africa and South America.[1] They are usually found around buildings in tropical areas. They can compete with populations of the black widow spider. It has migrated to many parts of the world. It is found in many areas of the United States, Australia, Afghanistan, Japan, Tanzania, Dominican Republic, Cyprus, Costa Rica, El Salvador, and Brazil, and there have been sightings in the United Arab Emirates and Thailand.

Wiki

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post-156436-0-29893400-1430281452_thumb.

Do these bury holes in the ground?

An old friend spent some time in Surin and went catching them, roasting and eating them (look like what he described).

A bit of an odd thing to do, but he was from Kent so understandable.

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That last picture is not a true scorpion, but a whip scorpion or vinegaroon.

It is harmless to people and in fact helpful as it eats cockroaches and other pests in the house.

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BANGKOK 21 November 2017 05:58
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