Esterhazy

Home internet: True or AIS?

61 posts in this topic

As I mentioned earlier the international lines (Cogent, GTT, NTT, AAG etc.) that your traffic get rerouted through (independent of ISP) each have their own per connection speeds which are typically limited to at most 1 Mbps (time of day dependent).

This is completely untrue. You really ought to be sure you know what you're talking about before making pronouncements of this nature.

For reference, I have True's Small Business aDSL service, 3,000ThB/month. It's 8mb/sec down and 512kb/sec up.

Due to TCP RTTs, I get ~6mb/sec downloads transpacific for TCP-based stuff, irrespective of time-of-day. There is no inter-provider QoS; there is no 1mb/sec throttling for either the Small Business aDSL I have, or the normal consumer-grade product.

I would be on True fibre, but they don't have it built out in my area, yet. The reason I use the Small Business service is because the local loop is separated from the consumer side, so I'm not competing with a lot of BitTorrent.

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As I mentioned earlier the international lines (Cogent, GTT, NTT, AAG etc.) that your traffic get rerouted through (independent of ISP) each have their own per connection speeds which are typically limited to at most 1 Mbps (time of day dependent).

This is completely untrue. You really ought to be sure you know what you're talking about before making pronouncements of this nature.

For reference, I have True's Small Business aDSL service, 3,000ThB/month. It's 8mb/sec down and 512kb/sec up.

Due to TCP RTTs, I get ~6mb/sec downloads transpacific for TCP-based stuff, irrespective of time-of-day. There is no inter-provider QoS; there is no 1mb/sec throttling for either the Small Business aDSL I have, or the normal consumer-grade product.

I would be on True fibre, but they don't have it built out in my area, yet. The reason I use the Small Business service is because the local loop is separated from the consumer side, so I'm not competing with a lot of BitTorrent.

Sorry, you are correct - I should have said 1 MBps (Megabytes) - around 8 Megabits.

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I have had True for many years. Sometimes the speed slows to a crawl but if you unplug the router and plug it in again it will make a new connection to a node on True's server. Then the speed is OK. Also I had a lot of problems with firstly the True Router provided and then the TP-Link Routers with 7 going faulty. I switched to Belkin 4 years ago and now have no problems. True service centre were always helpful even though most of the time the problem was the defective TP-Link Routers.

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Also I had a lot of problems with firstly the True Router provided and then the TP-Link Routers with 7 going faulty. I switched to Belkin 4 years ago and now have no problems. True service centre were always helpful even though most of the time the problem was the defective TP-Link Routers.

Can anyone else corroborate the TP Link router issues? Not that I don't believe Estrada, but more than one data point could be helpful. Also, it's possible that the default factory setting on the TP Link's were different than the default setting on the Belkin's and that's the difference. I'm always gobsmacked at the number of optional settings available. And I don't have a PhD in networkology.

Anyone? (I'll be buying a Belkin regardless, just to try it out) Thanks, Estrada!

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We have had 3bb for some years now (Khoksamrong Lopburi). Very helpful with any line problems and always return my calls with good spoken English.

I agree with you. We had a router go faulty. I could have put a new one and programmed it but as we are paying for the service we caled them and within hours they came and changed it for a new one. I have no complaints with 3BB. People here seem to think their download speed will remain constant, it wont for a number of reasons I wont go into here. Shannon provides all the answers if anyone knows of that theory and understands it

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Also I had a lot of problems with firstly the True Router provided and then the TP-Link Routers with 7 going faulty. I switched to Belkin 4 years ago and now have no problems. True service centre were always helpful even though most of the time the problem was the defective TP-Link Routers.

Can anyone else corroborate the TP Link router issues? Not that I don't believe Estrada, but more than one data point could be helpful. Also, it's possible that the default factory setting on the TP Link's were different than the default setting on the Belkin's and that's the difference. I'm always gobsmacked at the number of optional settings available. And I don't have a PhD in networkology.

Anyone? (I'll be buying a Belkin regardless, just to try it out) Thanks, Estrada!

I cannot corroborate Estrada, but it is a common issue with consumer grade routers..... especially if you torrent alot. The more connections you open, the more memory used -- and quite a few don't do the best job of cleaning up their memory.... they will then slow down to a crawl because of the lack of memory. Turning them off and on cleans up the memory and they are back to their old self. Because of the volume / activity I could put through a modem I found them already beginning to degrade after 24 hours....

I do have a TP-Link Router, but not one of the cheap ones (cheaper, but not cheap). I use a TL-ER5120 router which allows me to load balance across multiple lines (in my case 2). I still use the consumer grade "routers" but they are turned to bridge mode (meaning I just use them as modems - no other functionality) - no software, no memory issues on the modems. I have no problems with slowdowns, but then it cost me probably around 10K to 12K baht in Thailand (overpriced, but not many options for them here).

P.S. Most consumer grade "routers" are pretty much crap, memory problems and lots of security issues across quite a number of them.

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I had a True Internet DOCSIS connection for 3 years and it was the most stable internet connection I've ever come across,just amazing never needed rebooting for months at a time I can highly recommend it.I think the router was a Thompson one which was ok and did the job adequetely but obviously a third-party Cisco should do a better job speed wise,the only thing I had a nightmare with was trying to connect a WiFi printer to it.

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Ask your new neighbors. They'll have better information about service in your location.

I have True ADSL and it sucks. Goes down for hours, sometimes days at a time. Call them up, go through the menu, "press X for English" and get another Thai message. Have one of our Thai people call them, and it's go home and have an argument with the guy they send, who says my brand new router is "obsolete", need a new one.

Slows to a crawl whenever it rains, leading me to suspect crappy wiring down my sub-soi around Asoke. (Or everyone gets on the Interweb when the weather sucks)

But some of my workmates have True and it works great in their locations around BKK. And if you don't have problems with the signal, the field service frustrations don't really factor in.

If you are not connected by wire or fiber then expect the speed to vary with rain. Normally the attenuation over 300MHz is very significant in radio based systems

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Slows to a crawl whenever it rains, leading me to suspect crappy wiring down my sub-soi around Asoke. (Or everyone gets on the Interweb when the weather sucks)

If you are not connected by wire or fiber then expect the speed to vary with rain. Normally the attenuation over 300MHz is very significant in radio based systems

Sadly, I have to confess that I have 2 wires coming into a junction box on my balcony and nary a clue where those 2 wires lead on their side. I thought I was connected by wire... I guess for all I know, those wires may lead to a satellite dish on the roof, though I figured I was somehow connected to that ungodly rat's nest of cables on the poles at the street in front of my apartment building.

Which begs the question, is there a resource (link) that explains in English the different connection schemes for the internet options here in Thailand? Cable, fiber, frequencies, bandwidth, limitations, idiosyncrasies, caveats, etc?

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ID: 30   Posted (edited)

If you have a pair of wires it is a normal phone line so an ADSL connection (with or without an actual landline phone/number). This is normal and what most people have used until that last year or two. There has been limited coax access for internet as an addition to cable TV in a few locations - but this has been very limited and only in major cities AFAIK - this allowed always on higher speed connections than most ADSL. New option is Fiber Optic directly to home and this allows very high speeds and other services (such as phone/CATV) to also be provided.

Edit: today even ADSL can be quite good as backbone becomes more fiber optic cable the distance that signal must travel on bare wire is being greatly decreased - allowing much higher reliable speeds.

Edited by lopburi3

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ID: 31   Posted (edited)

try the new AIS Fiber if possible, it is fast, reliable, no up and down, never any problem 50/15 for 590 Baht!

pdc

After years of dealing with the various frustrations of True's spotty cable internet service and equally spotty customer service in BKK, I just ditched them this week and finally was able to sign up for 3BB's Fiber to the Home (FTTH) service of 100/10 Mbps for 1200b+ per month.

Thus far in my testing, it's way faster for both domestic and international (tested U.S. and Singapore servers) than the prior 30/3 MbpsTrue Online package that I was paying 799b+ a month for, which also included a mobile phone SIM I didn't use and cable TV I didn't watch.

I don't really care about 100 Mbps for Thailand connections, for the most part. But with True, I was getting about 1.5 Mbps to the U.S., and with 3BB, I'm getting 4-5 Mbps. And that I DO care about.

In the end, the final straw with True was they did something with their network, and for the past year or so, my upload speeds, even domestically, had been HORRIBLE. Supposedly has a 3 Mbps upload plan, but what I was getting was often less than 300 Kbps, even for basic things like Hotmail and Gmail. Had them out many times, they switched routers, changed all the lines, etc etc., and never did fix the problem. And for that matter, never could explain why suddenly, after years of no problems, their upload speeds had gone to h**l, at least for my location.

Plus, I really came to "enjoy" waking up for the day, sitting down in front of my PC to do some work, and finding my internet connection was dead. Call True, can't get thru on their phone line to English support, and it seemed they'd often turn off their voicemail menu option for English support during those times. And then eventually, I'd get a phone recording telling me their service was going to be out for most of the day for "network improvements." Well, if they're going to do like that, how about doing the work during off hours when people aren't trying to work. Or, at least, posting or sending some kind of advance notice to affected customers so they'd know ahead of time and could plan accordingly. But of course, never did like that.

Or, have a scheduled True service call, and wait at home during the appointed time. They don't show or call. Call them, they promise the tech is coming later. Wait at home for the rest of the day. The tech never shows, and their customer service never calls back.... That's the kind of stuff you can expect, if you ever have to deal with them for customer service.

Can't speak to AIS, since their fiber isn't available in my BKK neighborhood as yet. But in terms of customer service, I've always found AIS (whom I use for my mobile service) to be excellent, especially their English call center. The various flavors of True... not so much.

See my 3BB FTTH test results here below:

https://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/906767-3bb-fibre-quietly-upgraded-to-100-mbps/?p=10714664

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK

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I have True signal up and down in strength all the time

And mine is stable 99% of the time.

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Slows to a crawl whenever it rains, leading me to suspect crappy wiring down my sub-soi around Asoke. (Or everyone gets on the Interweb when the weather sucks)

If you are not connected by wire or fiber then expect the speed to vary with rain. Normally the attenuation over 300MHz is very significant in radio based systems

Sadly, I have to confess that I have 2 wires coming into a junction box on my balcony and nary a clue where those 2 wires lead on their side. I thought I was connected by wire... I guess for all I know, those wires may lead to a satellite dish on the roof, though I figured I was somehow connected to that ungodly rat's nest of cables on the poles at the street in front of my apartment building.

Which begs the question, is there a resource (link) that explains in English the different connection schemes for the internet options here in Thailand? Cable, fiber, frequencies, bandwidth, limitations, idiosyncrasies, caveats, etc?

Have a look at this link, it may help. It isnt a real technical piece of work but may be of use to you. If you need something more technical let me know. http://compnetworking.about.com/od/wirelessrouters/bb/wirelessrouter.htm

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As a side note I believe the True DOCSIS connections are a dedicated,single IP address to your house only,unilke the normal broadband which is bundled to 20-30 or more for the same IP address.I have to say the Customer Service in Bangkok was always excellent and I never had any problem at all,believe me I dumped their Platinum Package cable TV deal years ago when they lost the English Premier League and didn't knock a single satang off the bill,so I have less than zero reasons to recommend anything from them!

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One more time, back from a short trip and no luv from True ADSL using a Zytel or TP-Link router. Resets, on-off, unplugging- all the usual things haven't worked and it's the weekend so I have no translator to call their service line.

Off to Fortune Town to buy a Belkin router and if that doesn't solve the problem, I'll be switching providers.

I've had to do about half my web surfing this year by tethering my cell phone, and it's time for a change.

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If you are in Bangkok on an older True phone line (rather than installed for internet) that was installed under the old New York Telephone contract (first major phone line upgrade in Bangkok) believe they installed remote loopback terminators which is a known negative factor for ADSL. I had the issues but after many calls to fix something was done outside home and had no further issues.

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As a side note I believe the True DOCSIS connections are a dedicated,single IP address to your house only,unilke the normal broadband which is bundled to 20-30 or more for the same IP address.I have to say the Customer Service in Bangkok was always excellent and I never had any problem at all,believe me I dumped their Platinum Package cable TV deal years ago when they lost the English Premier League and didn't knock a single satang off the bill,so I have less than zero reasons to recommend anything from them!

I don't believe that's correct. AFAIK, the normal True cable internet service is based on Dynamic IP address assignments. They do have fixed IP address services, but those are more expensive and not the normal consumer plans they offer.

I had True DOCSIS cable internet for the past many years, and it was always Dynamic IP, and their service plans specified it as such.

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Quick tip: If you want a Belkin ADSL router, Fortune Town ain't the place to go. They have 'em on Lazada, but I was headed out for lunch anyway. May as well have been looking for unicorn eggs.

I felt kinda bad after the 8th shop... I was very polite and patient the first 4 or 5, explaining that the multitude of ADSL routers they did have were not what I wanted, I wanted to try a Belkin, blah blah blah. By the 7th or 8th, I was a little short- "if you don't have a Belkin, I don't want what you have, thank you". That's when it was time to come home and regroup.

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On 6 May 2016 at 3:22 PM, patyh said:

IMHO, if I only need internet and do not need cable TV from True, I would go for AIS.

As AIS is a new player, their network is not as congested as True. furthermore, they have more bandwidth than True.

AIS is also indirectly controlled by Singtel so the people handling the network is pretty knowledgeable..

My experience with their customer service so far has been top notch. Fast and helpful response. With True, it's always a 24 hours wait.

It may be because AIS is still new, but hey so far they are doing a pretty good job.. And for their price? Why not give them a go?!

Hi Patyh,

 

could you kindly recommend an AIS package of basic Internet and tv? 

 

Many people including my agent recommended True but I'm seeing too many horror stories. 

 

My prepaid sim card is AIS and so far so good. 

 

Thank you in advance. 

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11 hours ago, JWNY said:

Hi Patyh,

 

could you kindly recommend an AIS package of basic Internet and tv? 

 

Many people including my agent recommended True but I'm seeing too many horror stories. 

 

My prepaid sim card is AIS and so far so good. 

 

Thank you in advance. 

 

AIS basic internet is essentially powered by something like a android TV box. So, if you want to avoid the hassle, then the AIS playbox is a good pick. 

 

The plan with AIS playbox starts at 888 for a 50mbps plan. If you are a existing AIS post paid subscriber, the you can get 10% off. 

 

If all you do is just simple web browsing and TV watching, then 50mbps plan is more than enough. Heck, it's more than enough for me considering how many stuff I stream online nowadays. 

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