Jump to content
Thailand Visa Forum by Thai Visa | The Nation
rooster59

Thailand to mark World No Tobacco Day on May 31

Recommended Posts

Any person who refuses to wear a helmet on a motorcycle is unlikely to consider the potential health risks of smoking.

For many wearing a helmet gives as much of a false sense of security as a plaster Jesus on the dashboard and consider potential health risks of their actions even less. Although they may not smoke themselves.

Indeed. I'm not even very confident that the quality or Thai crash hats is good enough to prevent head injury. many of them seem to disintegrate if you so much as look at them, but I guess that's another story...

Many motorbike accidents in Thailand occur at relatively low speeds, (20 to 60 kph) similar to what might occur on a pedal powered bicycle. In these cases, the foam cored, plastic shelled cheapo helmet WILL make the difference between a fractured skull and a nasty headache and mild concussion if it is being worn and is fastened securely, not a given.

They will not be of much assistance in a high speed collision, or in being run over by a heavy goods vehicle, but in the latter case neither would a 20,000 baht proper helmet.

What this has to do with cigarettes I am not sure!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any person who refuses to wear a helmet on a motorcycle is unlikely to consider the potential health risks of smoking.

For many wearing a helmet gives as much of a false sense of security as a plaster Jesus on the dashboard and consider potential health risks of their actions even less. Although they may not smoke themselves.

Indeed. I'm not even very confident that the quality or Thai crash hats is good enough to prevent head injury. many of them seem to disintegrate if you so much as look at them, but I guess that's another story...

Many motorbike accidents in Thailand occur at relatively low speeds, (20 to 60 kph) similar to what might occur on a pedal powered bicycle. In these cases, the foam cored, plastic shelled cheapo helmet WILL make the difference between a fractured skull and a nasty headache and mild concussion if it is being worn and is fastened securely, not a given.

They will not be of much assistance in a high speed collision, or in being run over by a heavy goods vehicle, but in the latter case neither would a 20,000 baht proper helmet.

What this has to do with cigarettes I am not sure!

Nothing at all, unless the crash victim was also smoking. It was off-topic, you're right.

W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about simply making the highly addictive drug illegal to use? The reason it isn't is because of the incredible hypocrisy of those who make the rules. Yaba, marijauna, mushrooms, etc all illegal because they are considered 'dangerous'. Tobacco kills scores of thousand a year -- but no problem. Hypocritical to the max. No tobacco day is a band-aid on a bullet wound.

More harm is been done to the body and lungs by inhaling "Fresh Air" from the environment in bigger cities due to the amount of carbon monoxide in the atmosphere. If you want to stop this danger walk around with a respirator around your neck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tomorrow every school in Thailand puts on an anti smoking show for the students to watch and rightly so. Except if you smoke and your a teacher. It's a day that some teachers who smoke call a Sicky to get away from the anti smoking histeria. I smoke and wish I could give up the habit, but nicotine is not easy to give up. Children aren't told this, all they are told is the fire makes smoke side. I found out from the internet that it is easier to quit heroin than it is to quit nicotine. A friend of mine quit smoking using an e cigarette. Now that's banned in LOS. I guess patches or nicotine gum can be purchased in Thailand but I've never seen them for sale. Any helpful information would be gratefully received. Nicotine is the killer, just one cigarette and your hooked for life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about simply making the highly addictive drug illegal to use? The reason it isn't is because of the incredible hypocrisy of those who make the rules. Yaba, marijauna, mushrooms, etc all illegal because they are considered 'dangerous'. Tobacco kills scores of thousand a year -- but no problem. Hypocritical to the max. No tobacco day is a band-aid on a bullet wound.

Yeah because weed, shrooms and yaba are soooo hard to get. Every ban just creates a black market. Australia is about to that out the hard way with their defacto ban.

And to mark the day I am told I will no longer get a refund on my empty Winston packets. This 'promotion' which had been going for well over a year has now ceased. Not that is a lot of money, but whoever heard of getting a refund for an empty cigarette packet? Amazing Thailand!

Yes the black market is alive and well. (and has been for a long time) I just rang my mate to tell him I'll be back in Oz for a visit soon. He reckons he has already organised mine. Thanks mate!

Australia's outrageous taxes and impositions are going to have many unintended consequences. Your average, lone, late night convenience store operator will now be standing guard over a veritable gold mine. For an armed robber, stealing a mere 10 cartons of smokes will be the same as stealing $4,000, much more than they ever allow in the till at any one time. There are many parts of Melbourne where you should not wander around with a packet of smokes protruding from your top pocket, in a place where people will kill you for nothing, a packet of smokes will be a huge bonus.

The underworld will be rubbing their hands .....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any person who refuses to wear a helmet on a motorcycle is unlikely to consider the potential health risks of smoking.

What if they wear a helmet while smoking?

Working on Thai logic that seems like an ideal compromise!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This isn't going to go down well in our neighbouring villages where tobacco is a lucrative cash crop. When we go to the market at the village down the road we pass a tobacco buyers premises and at the village nearly every property has racks of tobacco leaves out drying in the sun.

Oddly enough I've never seen any in our village, but that's probably because we're in rice central.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any person who refuses to wear a helmet on a motorcycle is unlikely to consider the potential health risks of smoking.

What if they wear a helmet while smoking?

Working on Thai logic that seems like an ideal compromise!

harvey_williams.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about simply making the highly addictive drug illegal to use? The reason it isn't is because of the incredible hypocrisy of those who make the rules. Yaba, marijauna, mushrooms, etc all illegal because they are considered 'dangerous'. Tobacco kills scores of thousand a year -- but no problem. Hypocritical to the max. No tobacco day is a band-aid on a bullet wound.

Yeah because weed, shrooms and yaba are soooo hard to get. Every ban just creates a black market. Australia is about to that out the hard way with their defacto ban.

Agreed. And every black market is a potential tax and private business revenue stream if the banned products are made legal. Remember alcohol prohibition (yes kiddies, it was before my time too, but I remember The Untouchables with Elliot Ness). biggrin.png

We never eat fruitcake because it has rum,

And one little slice turns a man to a bum.

Oh, can you imagine the sorrier sight

Of a man eating fruitcake until he gets tight?

Away, away, with rum, by gum,

Rum by gum, rum by gum

Away, away, with rum, by gum,

The song of the Temperance Union.

A ban that worked until it didn't. Now alcohol sales provides huge income streams to major corporations (think Bud) and tax revenue streams for the every hungrier federal, state, and local governments (Well Budweiser probably doesn't pay taxes, but plenty of 'sin' taxes plus sales taxes are collected from John Q. Public.)

Every excuse for banning currently 'banned' products can be used to invoke a ban of tobacco and alcohol; and conversely, every excuse to legalize banned products can, and has been used for the legalization of tobacco and alcohol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 17 December 2017 17:08
Sponsors
×