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What are you eating? (food porn)

718 posts in this topic

On 13/04/2017 at 7:42 PM, tutsiwarrior said:

fer the chappatis inna big mixing bowl I use half and half all purpose white and wheat flour, baking soda and salt (2 empty tuna cans of each plus 1 teaspoon of the others), mix then add some oil of any kind and mix again until it starts to ball up...then add water and mix until ye get a nice round, non sticky dough ball...be careful with the water as it's harder to add more flour...

 

in most chappati recipes baking soda is not included but I like a bit of rise...

 

cover and let the dough ball set fer a bit...sit down and have a drink...then roll out on a floured surface...

 

heat up a skillet (I use gas) then cut the ball into pieces that when ye roll flat will fit the skillet, I can usually get 12 from the amounts above...roll flat with a suitable device, I use a big pestle, and drop in the skillet when it's hot...when the surface starts to bubble flip over fer another 30 seconds...repeat with the rest...keep hot inna tea towel...

 

fer the tortillas it's the same but using all white all purpose flour...

 

just like anything else experiment until ye get what ye like...once ye get in the rhythm it's all done in an hour...

 

I read something somewhere about a gringo in rural mexico waking up to the pleasing sound of women slapping tortillas around a communal wood fired comal (griddle) and chatting and thought hmmm (I grew up with tortillas in southern California)...then I worked in the middle east fer a number of years and got used to arabic bread...and then flatbread took over my life...

 

 

 

 

That's a really nice post Tutsi. Just for that I'm gonna share my Indian bread recipe. Deep fried and puffs up into a hollow ball that you can stuff with curry & rice. Crispy outside, chewy inside and tastes a little like a doughnut. Best with chicken madras.

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On 13/04/2017 at 6:08 PM, Minnie the Minx said:

For the crabs they were killed humanely, in the fridge then split in half. Roe is delicious. 

 

Marinate them for half an hour in a dash or soy, oyster sauce, hoi sin, rock sugar, shallots, ginger, garlic, fresh chillies, sea salt and white vino.

 

Into the pan with some fish stock and basically steam them, cover off and let the mix reduce. The famous Singapore crab dish is spicy, tone this down if you have kids, my view is the seafood should be the centrepice flavour not the spices but in this case the sauce is the star. 

Fish stock, what do you use?

 

I keep all the shells and prawn heads till I've a good pan full. Fry up some onion, celery, garlic in olive oil, add white wine, carrot, prawn heads & shells. Boil for 10 mins then add water, salt & pepper and simmer for 30 mins. Strain and freeze in ice cube trays. Good stuff.

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2 hours ago, grollies said:

That's a really nice post Tutsi. Just for that I'm gonna share my Indian bread recipe. Deep fried and puffs up into a hollow ball that you can stuff with curry & rice. Crispy outside, chewy inside and tastes a little like a doughnut. Best with chicken madras.

yeah...some years ago someone in the US came up with the 'breakfast burrito' where ye had rice n beans, ham n eggs and whatever else all wrapped up inna flour tortilla, then down the hatch...

 

I was amused as back in the 70s when it was my turn to make breakfast I'd do scrambled eggs with whatever available leftovers and then set them out with the usual toast, butter and jam but also with a stack of nice fresh (store bought) corn tortillas and some bottled salsa...while the others were buttering their toast I took a tortilla and went at it with some salsa and folks took note...and a new culinary horizon suddenly appeared although the mexicans had been eating this way fer hunnerds of years...

 

flat bread goes well with everything and is part of a great tradition...

 

 

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ID: 705   Posted (edited)

5 hours ago, U235 said:

Strange enough I like it, I can not imagine how my reaction would be if a restaurant owner at home would tell me that the nice lamb dish I had was in fact goat ;-)

when i found out (40 years ago) that in India "mutton" = "goat" and mentioned "you Injuns have 1,001 ways to büllshyte a Ferangi like me!" i was told "THIS IS INDIA!"

Quote

As per the English Dictionary, LAMB refers to the meat of a baby sheep whereas MUTTON refers to the meat of an adult sheep.

However, in Sub Continent Countries (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh etc.) and Arabian Gulf Countries (Saudi, Dubai etc.) MUTTON refers to GOAT MEAT whereas LAMB refers to SHEEP MEAT.

Hence, when westerners come to these countries they get confused because GOAT MEAT there is referred to simply as GOAT MEAT or Cabrito and Sheep Meat is categorized as LAMB (baby sheep) or MUTTON (adult sheep).

https://www.quora.com/Why-in-India-mutton-is-referred-to-meat-of-goat-while-it-is-actually-the-meat-of-sheep

 

Edited by Naam

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54 minutes ago, CLW said:

Anyone ever tried to make fermented cabbage / sauerkraut at home?

YEP, we did that 60 years ago. i was chafing the cabbage, my little brother added the layers of salt and both of us were pissed off because we'd rather gone swimming in the river.

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My mum used to, in huge sterilized glass jars, German style, from memory she shredded the white cabbage, black peppercorns, dill, salt, fresh horseradish shoot to give it a kick and three parts water to one part white vinegar. Gerkhins were another favourite.

 

Actually after shredding it she sprinkled salt all over it and left it for thirty minutes then squeezed out the juice and packed it in layers like that with the above condiments and herbs.

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22 minutes ago, Minnie the Minx said:

My mum used to, in huge sterilized glass jars, German style

our Sauerkraut fermented in a huge and heavy earthenware round container about 100cm high, diameter 40cm.

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ID: 711   Posted (edited)

What do you flavour it with? The preserving jars idea is nice as they went into the cellar and subsequently used to make cabbage rolls as well as an accompaniment to meals. ( Basel ) they were also portable, the smaller ones brought to the table.

 

That's a huge container.

 

Hey I will dig up the exact recipe for you, this was my Swiss grandma's recipe the quantities are important.

Edited by Minnie the Minx

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29 minutes ago, Minnie the Minx said:

she shredded the white cabbage, black peppercorns, dill, salt, fresh horseradish shoot to give it a kick

our Sauerkraut was tasty but what your Mum prepared sounds delicious! i am planning to give it a try and do the same.

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Just now, Minnie the Minx said:

What do you flavour it with?

for the fermentation process only unrefined salt was used. later smaller portions were put in separate containers, drained partly and very dry white wine (rather cheap vin de table from our own vineyard) as well as caraway seeds were added.  

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I found some recipes on the net but they call for a fermentation temperature between 18-20°C which is difficult to achieve here.
Outside too warm and in the fridge too cold.
The recipe uses big glass jars

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On 4/24/2017 at 7:41 PM, grollies said:

Where????

I wasn't ignoring you just missed it. Social & Co here and if you can finish it in half an hour it's yours free.

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11 minutes ago, CLW said:

I found some recipes on the net but they call for a fermentation temperature between 18-20°C which is difficult to achieve here.
Outside too warm and in the fridge too cold.
The recipe uses big glass jars

Here's a weird idea you may want to try. Mother did this stuff in the cellar. You relocate to Ozland and dad had a room under the house so all good. He also liked to make his own beer and let me tell you that one when the temps got to 40C and he stored over a hundred bottles of home made and they exploded in the garage lol. Firebrigade etc.

 

You can successfully make sauerkraut and keep it in A/C conditions, how that relates to folks on here I don't know. It goes off quickly true. 

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14 minutes ago, CLW said:

I found some recipes on the net but they call for a fermentation temperature between 18-20°C which is difficult to achieve here.
Outside too warm and in the fridge too cold.
The recipe uses big glass jars

No problem, the jars I made in my previous post are just kept in a kitchen cabinet, next to the home made picked gherkins and onions.

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