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Total Immersion – An Expats View after 10 years in Thailand

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Johnniey    1,858

Sorry buddy but you can't start the naturalization process. Why mention it apart to sound superior.

You don't even have the Tabien bahn(Yellow Book) or the 3 years paying tax on over 40k.

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Khun Paul    489

It was an interesting read, unfortunately a lot about what he wanted and did, a sort of self congratulatory article, attempting to educate us poor uneducated seniors who shoyld know better. Some good points, learning Thai and more interaction.

Food, after 15 years eaten Thai food , it does not agree with me some does but sitting on the floor , fine occasionally but not all the time, many of my Thai friends use tables and chairs as well.

Air-con goes without sayin g 5000 a month as opposed to 1400 a month for electric makes common-sense.

If it suits him so-be it ,but for many of us we have learnt to live and let live, as integration is obvious that assimilation into Thai society is very hard, also losing his British nationality would be a retrograde step as movement around the world will be harder.

But to each his own, not for me.

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faraday    770
10 hours ago, hobobo said:

3,378 words! Words of infinte wisdom, and a subtle mockery of everyone else. What a lot of drivel!

Do you live in Thailand?

I thought that what the op wrote was very good. Its certainly not 'drivel'...

but maybe you are one of the 'many fools' on here that only wants negativaty, so they can boost their impotent ego.

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PumbaBangkok    17

Bryan , is your effort to learn the language better quite recent? 28 hrs tuition per week would seem a lot after 10 years . I enjoyed the article, thanks for posting.

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onemorechang    3,722
11 hours ago, hobobo said:

3,378 words! Words of infinte wisdom, and a subtle mockery of everyone else. What a lot of drivel!

 

Well done  counting all them words. 10 out of 10  for endurance .  :thumbsup:

 

Cant take a western bar owner to serious on Tv :coffee1:

 

Edited by onemorechang
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joepattaya1961    692

After almost 13 years living in Thailand I do agree on most of the OP's post.

 

Thai food: Not my favorite especially when lemon-grass or fermented fish-sauce is involved, but luckily there are some nice Thai dishes. I found a good balance between Thai food and Western food,  self-cooked or ready made .

Thai language:  I should be able by now to read, write, speak and understand Thai 90%, but unfortunately I'm not. If I'm trying most Thais say "Phood kaeng kaeng", but that's more a kind way of saying: The bugger is doing his best, but we've no clue what he's on about.

Thai time and appointments:  I've learned that having an appointment at 9 a.m. means that the actual meeting time is somewhere between 9 a.m. and 9.59 a.m.; as long as the "9" is used, they're in time. Was not easy to accept with my 50% German genes. However, more and more Thais manage to be in time for appointments and that's probably due to the smart use of smart-phones.

 Thai attitude:  The Thai's attitude and social behavior is pretty selfish and ignorant. Not only towards foreigners, but towards other Thais as well. Was not easy to deal with, but after almost 13 years I got used to it. It doesn't mean that I now slam the door in other people's faces or leave a full tray of waste at a KFC table.

Corruption:  That's something I'll never get used to. "Under the table deals", paying off officials, paying off police.....I just don't understand the 'game'. I don't seem to recognize the moment to make a 'deal'.

Thai discussion:  I've learned that Thais like to argue until the moment that they're about to loose (face). There will be a silence which should be respected or in other words: If the Thai become silent during an argument, stop arguing. There will be no more replies and it's if you're talking to a wall. Depending on the severeness this silence may last a few days until suddenly all is forgotten and fine again. This is not the moment to start the argument again......."Let it be!"

Having an argument with unknown Thais (e.g. in a bar or disco) will mostly result in a win on your side and the Thai opponent will leave the "battle-field" with a big smile, but watch out, he may return with (armed) forces and win the argument in his own way.

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hobobo    710
22 minutes ago, onemorechang said:

 

Well done  counting all them words. 10 out of 10  for endurance .  :thumbsup:

 

Cant take a western bar owner to serious on Tv :coffee1:

 

Luckily Microsoft Word can still count the words, I would have fallen off my bar stool before the end 55555

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Khon Kaen Dave    2,737

:clap2:Great post,now,what was it you said again? I must be one of the much older guys(i'm not 60 yet) that he found it easier than to fit into life here.:coffee1:

What a waste of screen time,electricity and interest.

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Johnniey    1,858
8 hours ago, Khun Paul said:

It was an interesting read, unfortunately a lot about what he wanted and did, a sort of self congratulatory article, attempting to educate us poor uneducated seniors who shoyld know better. Some good points, learning Thai and more interaction.

Food, after 15 years eaten Thai food , it does not agree with me some does but sitting on the floor , fine occasionally but not all the time, many of my Thai friends use tables and chairs as well.

Air-con goes without sayin g 5000 a month as opposed to 1400 a month for electric makes common-sense.

If it suits him so-be it ,but for many of us we have learnt to live and let live, as integration is obvious that assimilation into Thai society is very hard, also losing his British nationality would be a retrograde step as movement around the world will be harder.

But to each his own, not for me.

You don't lose your British nationality when getting Thai citizenship.

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Zyxel    110

You wrote:

Learn the Language

 

Language is one of the biggest causes of arguments, conflicts in relationships, business and daily life. Not only that you become less efficient as a human and not reaching your potential here, you miss out of the ways Thai think, to really know what they are like, you need to learn their language, it does really teach you about their culture. Once your language skills take off, you have more understanding, therefore less things to get mad about. For instance Thais often say “wait 5 minutes” they translate this to our language and we take it as accurate approximation, otherwise they would have said 10 or 20 minutes right? Well they say 5 minutes to anything, so it could be 30 minutes lol But now I understand that I can deal with it by doing some work on my phone or going away and coming back. There are too many benefits to list from learning the language of the country you stay in and you often underestimate it until you start learning but if you want a better chance of happiness and satisfaction here, its better to talk to the locals and you will find a lot better prices around and maybe people that can help you. Plenty of Thais are more capable of helping us than most farang here, so its good to befriend them. I am currently learning Thai 28 hours per week again, reading and writing in part of my quest for total immersion. There is a whole new world opening up for me right now and you sure get Thais being a lot friendlier with you and nicer.

 

 

   I assume you are about 35 years old since you have been in Thailand for 10 years and you were 25 when you arrived. Learning Thai is difficult but at your age it is still possible. I was 44 when I started to go to a Thai language school and after 3 years I could speak not too bad, write simple sentences and read children books with simple vocabulary and also street signs etc. Today without enough practice I start forgetting my vocabulary and sometimes the right tone for a word. When I was 24 my company sent me to South America where I spent 6 years and I was fluent in Spanish in 3 or 4 months and still now after 30 years I can speak and understand very well. Just to say that  age is paramount when somebody is learning a new language especially Thai. Of course there are exceptions but if you start at 50 or more forget it you will never be fluent.

The graph below might be a bit extreme but it gives a good idea:

 

nihms234356f2.jpg

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Johnniey    1,858
14 hours ago, Khun Paul said:

It was an interesting read, unfortunately a lot about what he wanted and did, a sort of self congratulatory article, attempting to educate us poor uneducated seniors who shoyld know better. Some good points, learning Thai and more interaction.

 

One thing you should know Paul is that nobody calls themselves "Khun". This is a word of respect that other people call you.

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BANGKOK 22 August 2017 12:26
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