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BANGKOK 19 October 2018 23:17
KevT

University degree an obligation?

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23 minutes ago, theguyfromanotherforum said:

Bro, it's just annoying to read a reply after reply telling you that university degree is a requirement in Thailand, but you go on about all the irrelevant diplomas you have and languages that you speak. Completely irrelevant as University degree is the only legal requirement in Thailand.

 

BTW, I finished a 3 year CEGEP in Quebec (btw, CEGEP is not a college, it's more like an extension of high school). Even in Quebec this is not recognized as a university degree. However, University in Quebec is only 3 years instead of 4 and they are dirt cheap, so there is your chance.

 

I reread my posts. 2/3 of them were useful questions or information which helped me better understand details about requirements in Thailand. And for what it is worth CÉGEPS are actually called colleges, even though they might not be the same as colleges. 

 

The thread was basically done, I don't see why you had to dig it up.

Edited by KevT

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On 10/3/2016 at 6:51 AM, allane said:

Yes, if you want a Work Permit, and/or your employer wants you to have one. If you want to complete the Thai Culture Course, so that you will not be dependent on two year waivers, you must not only have a university degree, but an education degree, to be allowed to that.

I know 2 people who circumvented the official rules. One has a degree from a university which no longer exists (he is very old). And to avoid hassle like Krusapha waivers, he seems to have taked the government employer into changing the job description. Voila, no TCT approval needed. And because of an O Visa, he won't show up at Immigration to report the job. (Not sure if that's illegal?)

 

#2 is a guy who never went to university, period. He's making 25 k up North, working for an agency. To protect a confidence, I won't say more. But there must be thousands like him!

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On 10/17/2016 at 7:46 PM, Kf6vci said:

 

#2 is a guy who never went to university, period. He's making 25 k up North, working for an agency. To protect a confidence, I won't say more. But there must be thousands like him!

 

Doubt it's thousands mate. More like a couple hundred. It's all about the money. You won't get money from Bangkok unless you use an agency and lie or condone the agencies lies. It's just a circle but money trickles out and down. 

Edited by BruceMangosteen

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On 10/7/2016 at 8:38 PM, KhaoNiaw said:

 

Unfortunately, you'll find that Thai students will mostly give up speaking English if you use Thai. I have colleagues who spend half their time talking  to students in pidgin Thai and it's a total waste of time. I even worked with one guy whose contract wasn't renewed because he kept speaking to the students in Thai, though the funny thing was they probably understood more of his English anyway. 

 

My Thai is excellent but very few of my students ever work out that I can even understand everything they say, although sometimes the penny drops when I answer questions they've asked in Thai. It's not because I believe L1 has no place in the classroom because I feel it's a very valuable tool. But you're very unlikely to be teaching a class in Thailand where the positive advantages of speaking Thai outweigh the negatives. Work out how to put it to good use in homework assignments etc. where the students are working on their own or together. You simply spouting the Thai definitions of "diligent, decision, false, discipline and intention" isn''t going to help any students learn the meanings or make your class go more smoothly. Very often, the students will be way ahead of you anyway, looking at the dictionaries on their phones, at their own pace and accessing the vocabulary they want to learn, which is generally much faster than you doing it in Thai.

 

Your reply validates my theory that the immersion method is best. I have read that in US military language schools, English is essentially forbidden. Want to say something? Learn how to do it in the language you are learning. I'm sure it presents challenges, but of course learning a new language is a challenge itself.

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For the vast majority of jobs in teaching, you will have to have a degree and the degree will have say 'Bachelor's' on it.   The degree and the police clearance are essential for the vast majority of people teaching.  Actually, the degree needs to be in Education, otherwise the Teacher's License is not issued, but instead a waiver is given, but it is not permanent.

 

Schools can apply for a Work Permit listing an employee as something other than as a teacher, such as assistant, coordinator, etc..   Most schools do not hire people in those positions, but give them to existing staff who they wish to retain.   There is a limit on the number.   I know one school can only have 10% of the staff as something other than a teacher.   The Ministry of Labor is well aware that this is generally just a work around to the regulations on teachers and occasionally an employee or the school are called to task for trying it.  

 

I know of some language schools who do supply a work permit, but all the people I know who got a WP, also had a Bachelor's degree.   I don't know if it was required or not.

 

Whether a degree is necessary is not has been argued out many times and just ends up in a circular argument.

 

Best of luck to the OP.

 

 

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25 minutes ago, jumpzone123 said:

No you do not need a degree to teach.  The only people that say this are sour people with useless degrees.

Whether or not you NEED one is irrelevant, Thailand REQUIRES that you have one.

 

 

In fact in some countries a Masters is required.

I think most people think they are experts on teaching because they went to school - this just reflects on how bad the schools were to leave them with this illusion.

 

The fact is that regardless of subject, teaching is a skill just like any other profession; accountancy, law engineering, medicine and all these require a degree most of the time.

 

If you are going to teach without a degree, you need to demonstrate you have the critical faculties and learning abilities that you are trained to use on a degree course......it is very unusual to see people without a degree - however innately intelligent - who can actually display the critical abilities that are required to deliver an edifying lesson. Certainly not straight off - and they often develop some very strange ideas of their own as they "progress" without grounding or tuition during their career.

 

It would appear though, that basic educational theory is missing from teacher education in Thailand.

 

 

Edited by cumgranosalum

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Sorry to hijack the topic but looking for some advice.
I have just moved to Thailand & completed my TEFL 120 hour course.
I am looking for a job and see nearly all jobs require a degree. I have a 2 year diploma in Accounting. This gave me more credits than what a degree could in relation to the professional accounting exams in UK.
I would like to know if I could complete a degree in Accounting or Business studies in Thailand, using my diploma credits to maybe progress me to the final year of a degree?
I feeI that I would need to have a degree to give me more options in obtaining a teaching position.


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A university degree is only required if you insist on working for someone else for chump change.

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5 hours ago, LammyTS1 said:

Sorry to hijack the topic but looking for some advice.
I have just moved to Thailand & completed my TEFL 120 hour course.
I am looking for a job and see nearly all jobs require a degree. I have a 2 year diploma in Accounting. This gave me more credits than what a degree could in relation to the professional accounting exams in UK.
I would like to know if I could complete a degree in Accounting or Business studies in Thailand, using my diploma credits to maybe progress me to the final year of a degree?
I feeI that I would need to have a degree to give me more options in obtaining a teaching position.


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Yes You can. You must find an English Language program unless you are fluent in Thai however.

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2 hours ago, BruceMangosteen said:

You were scammed by the TEFL outfit. Just accept it and move on with your life. Good luck and may God Bless You.

 

Your god is a scam.

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On 11/14/2016 at 2:30 AM, A1Str8 said:

A university degree is only required if you insist on working for someone else for chump change.

 

Yup......Couldn't have said it better myself!

Edited by ukmark67

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