rooster59

May ready for tough talks over Brexit

5,555 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Grouse said:

 

I have no intention of discussing this further. 

 

You have clearly not not considered either of the pieces posted on here.

 

I have no interest in insulting you; frankly It's unnecessary.

 

As for arrogance, absolutely!🙂

 

You have not even noticed the change in May's stance and the effect of that,  have you?

 

So, as I say, provide some useful, interesting input or use a different thread. OK?

 

The link provided by Jingthing (love his food and restaurant threads by the way) is old ground, already discussed on the last thread.

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14 minutes ago, Khun Han said:

 

The link provided by Jingthing (love his food and restaurant threads by the way) is old ground, already discussed on the last thread.

 

From 3 days ago.

 

Listen Han, you're an intelligent bloke. I want to debate the issues. Stop sniping. Please? 🙂

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5 minutes ago, Khun Han said:

 

I'm not sniping. I pointed out that we've already discussed the NYR article.

 

I had not seen it

 

Was it on the closed thread?

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Grouse said:

 

I had not seen it

 

Was it on the closed thread?

 

 

Actually it's #5 on this thread. 

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2 minutes ago, ilostmypassword said:

Actually it's #5 on this thread. 

 

Thats what I am referring to!

 

Han wants to beat me up for not seeing the piece on the closed thread

 

Any idea what number?

 

I'm trying to be polite!

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I don't know whether the topic of this thread is still the same as the title 'May ready for tough talks over Brexit' but the reports seem grim from what I've been reading in the papers. The EU negotiator asked that discussions be in French and then May was kept waiting until 1am to give her 'Brexit' speech that lasted all of 5 minutes. This type of treatment was always to be expected when the UK tried to negotiate with a bloc 9-10 times its size. 
From the UK's perspective, it must be terrifying to see how one small area of Belgium is blocking the Canada-EU trade deal that's been dragging on for 7 years, prompting Canada to walk out and brand the EU impossible. A sign of things to come for the UK I think. 

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2 hours ago, Grouse said:

 

Powerfully put!

 

I wonder whether there is a possibility of adjusting the free movement of workers regulation to tamp down the growing unease about this across much of the EU now?

 

I agree with your economic case.

 

There's no growing unease about free movement of workers across the rest of the EU as far as I'm aware. Why would you think that there was?

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9 minutes ago, Xircal said:

 

There's no growing unease about free movement of workers across the rest of the EU as far as I'm aware. Why would you think that there was?

 

If Schengen borders were secure, I don't think there is a major problem. But in the current febrile environment there are problems in several northern EU states which require attention. How to deal with the specific UK issue is a bit different. Maybe the collapsing pound will produce its own solution.

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ID: 52   Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, Khun Han said:

 

If they put a lid on their arrogance and condescension Bill, all they have left is speculation that keeps getting confounded by events, thirteen admin jobs from a fancy dress costume company going to Holland, and THE EXCHANGE RATE!!! (:shock1:). Much easier to call anyone not agreeing with them (including the prime minister) stupid in as many 'clever' ways that they can think of.

 

Yes, the exchange rate. IMHO, dismissal of sterling's precipitous drop is not something which is exactly the smartest thing to do, but I can appreciate the distress suffered of others pointing it out.

Edited by SheungWan

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4 hours ago, SheungWan said:

 

Yes, the exchange rate. IMHO, dismissal of sterling's precipitous drop is not something which is exactly the smartest thing to do, but I can appreciate the distress suffered of others pointing it out.

 

On that note:

 

"The pound has found some support as traders recognize that its depreciation has benefits for a nation that’s struggling to boost exports and needs to fund a record current-account deficit. Sterling traders were also encouraged by U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond’s suggestion this week that the government wants to keep all options open as it leaves the EU. Still, most of the pound’s moves in recent months have been downward -- and there’s little suggestion that this is set to change. Pound forecasters polled by Bloomberg are more bearish than ever on the U.K. currency’s prospects.  And though the $1.25 median year-end prediction is now stronger than the exchange rate, that reflects how difficult it’s been for strategists to keep pace with sterling’s slide, rather than optimism about a bounce. “What we should expect now is a certain amount of quiet before the next lurch lower,” said SocGen’s Juckes.

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-22/pound-s-uncomfortable-truce-can-t-mask-the-risk-of-abrupt-swings

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5 hours ago, chiang mai said:

 

On that note:

 

"The pound has found some support as traders recognize that its depreciation has benefits for a nation that’s struggling to boost exports and needs to fund a record current-account deficit. Sterling traders were also encouraged by U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond’s suggestion this week that the government wants to keep all options open as it leaves the EU. Still, most of the pound’s moves in recent months have been downward -- and there’s little suggestion that this is set to change. Pound forecasters polled by Bloomberg are more bearish than ever on the U.K. currency’s prospects.  And though the $1.25 median year-end prediction is now stronger than the exchange rate, that reflects how difficult it’s been for strategists to keep pace with sterling’s slide, rather than optimism about a bounce. “What we should expect now is a certain amount of quiet before the next lurch lower,” said SocGen’s Juckes.

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-22/pound-s-uncomfortable-truce-can-t-mask-the-risk-of-abrupt-swings

 

Yes, that's a good piece!

 

I agree with all of the points made

 

Be interesting to see how it gets shot down 🙂

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If they put a lid on their arrogance and condescension Bill, all they have left is speculation that keeps getting confounded by events, thirteen admin jobs from a fancy dress costume company going to Holland, and THE EXCHANGE RATE!!! (:shock1:). Much easier to call anyone not agreeing with them (including the prime minister) stupid in as many 'clever' ways that they can think of.



The chief executive of the bankers association has some news for you

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/22/leading-banks-set-to-pull-out-of-brexit-uk?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

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33 minutes ago, Johnyo said:

 

 


The chief executive of the bankers association has some news for you

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/22/leading-banks-set-to-pull-out-of-brexit-uk?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

 

 

 

Very worrying. Confirmed by Reuters

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKCN12M0U7?client=safari

 

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15 hours ago, Khun Han said:

 

If they put a lid on their arrogance and condescension Bill, all they have left is speculation that keeps getting confounded by events, thirteen admin jobs from a fancy dress costume company going to Holland, and THE EXCHANGE RATE!!! (:shock1:). Much easier to call anyone not agreeing with them (including the prime minister) stupid in as many 'clever' ways that they can think of.

 

Here's a good quote from H L Mencken

 

"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard"

 

:smile:

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1 hour ago, Johnyo said:

 

 


The chief executive of the bankers association has some news for you

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/22/leading-banks-set-to-pull-out-of-brexit-uk?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other


Sent from my iPhone using Thaivisa Connect

 

 

On the other hand, having such a concentration of financial institutions gives them a disproportionate amount of power in the UK.  They played a major role in getting the Tories to slash taxes on the wealthy to cut services to the unemployed and to  inadequately fund the NHS.  Perhaps that is one reason why the middle class in other Northern European nations mostly has it so much better than do the British.  The pestilence has largely been confined to the UK.

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15 hours ago, Khun Han said:

My prediction (everybody seems to good at these on here) is that PM May will continue to cut a balance between stated aims and 'singing nice songs' whilst keeping the UK's negotiating cards close to her chest. The deal eventually struck will be quota-based immigration with some restrictions on lower skills migrants. And a trade deal costing an annual fee of several (but less than ten) billion Euros which will also be quota-based, with quite high minimum quotas for import of German and French products and services and a few from other countries to give an appearance of fairness.

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/may/10/uk-trade-deficit-hits-new-record-of-24bn-pounds-eu-referendum-brexit

 

Figures from the ONS showed that Europe is gradually becoming a less important destination for UK companies. In 2000, 60% of exports went to other EU countries, but the percentage fell to 58% in 2005, 54% in 2010 and 47% in 2015.

                                                            -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The UK doesn't need the EU to be successful. The EU will implode. A hard brexit is better than allowing negotiations to drag on and on. It is not what T May wants, it is what the EU will allow the UK. The arrogance of people like Junker is enough to walk away from the table now.

 

I am sure the EU think the UK will come cap in hand begging for a trade deal. Pull the rug from under their feet and leave as soon as article 50 is enacted. no negotiating. For the UK to get a good deal they need the threaten the survival of the EU.

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43 minutes ago, Grouse said:

 

Here's a good quote from H L Mencken

 

"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard"

 

:smile:

 did you watch Paxman on Trump and Clinton? :whistling: 

I'm with Churchill when he said 

 

"The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter." 

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BANGKOK 28 May 2017 21:19
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