peter smith

credit card

28 posts in this topic

ID: 16   Posted (edited)

In the USA, after (I believe) 7 years (or less, maybe 5?), the debt is no longer collectible if they never pursued action, and the credit reporting agencies remove the debt from one's credit report.

 

If one pays back anything before that time, the 7 years begins anew.

 

So depending on how long ago this was, what the law is in your country and Thailand, how credit reporting agencies in Thailand work, etc., you'd be best served by assessing all of this first and making a judgement call on how to proceed as far as contacting the credit card companies or not.

Edited by JimmyJ

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You can also do a National  Credit Bureau Report through Krungsri.com....online..have a look.  Also, you could contact Amex in your own country.  You do come across ad an entitled, immature xxxxwit, though.  Might even be on your home country credit report.  Just don't cry foul when you get caught gaming the system...like so many others.  A teacher with bad credit?  Say it isn't so, lol.

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10 minutes ago, KhonKaenKowboy said:

You can also do a National  Credit Bureau Report through Krungsri.com....online..have a look.  

 

Do you have a direct link to that at Krungsri? I can't find any reference to it. Thanks

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2 minutes ago, thedemon said:

 

Do you have a direct link to that at Krungsri? I can't find any reference to it. Thanks

I will have a look....you may need an account...I know I have seen it at their website, which is quite extensive.

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I think there is a lot of confusion between credit rating and immigration status in this thread. There is rarely a relationship between the two. You can find out your credit rating in many ways without needing to use a Thai entity. This is information shared widely among credit rating agencies. A bad credit rating can affect you in many negative ways, but credit card debts will never affect your immigration status, unless a court case has been initiated as a result of them. (Did this happen?) Even in that case, and a judgment against you in court, there is a further process needed before you are put on an immigration watch list. To check your immigration status (which, as I said, has nothing to do with your credit rating) you can contact http://www.thaivisaservice.com/.

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19 hours ago, KhonKaenKowboy said:

I will have a look....you may need an account...I know I have seen it at their website, which is quite extensive.

After logging onto your online account look under Other Services for Request NCB Report...see image below.  Cost is Bt150.   It's mailed to your Thai address.  And nope if wondering if I've asked for one the answer is no.

Capture.JPG.3296de757797cb496b39228aa984214f.JPG

 

Capture2.JPG.ed815d189233b2f330b6eb14479cebc2.JPG

 

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ID: 22   Posted (edited)

Thanks, Pib.  Also, looks like there are at least three locations on BTS to get one from NCB....also says free from certain branch of GSB.  Or you could email them, or just email Thai Amex.  I would bet that it could easily be linked to your credit report in the west.  Grab it by the horns...I have used card points for 10 return trips Thai-US...and rarely used the things.  Got one now that is better than cash...gives me 1% back and no foreign fee.  No where near possible to get good and free cards with less than excellent credit.  A default on your report could also mean higher rent as people with nice rentals wouldn't touch you with a barge pole..unless you have big deposit and pay stupid price.  It can also affect your employability....I had to sign off on a credit report for a teaching job twenty years ago....it is about honesty and integrity.

Edited by KhonKaenKowboy

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2 hours ago, Pib said:

After logging onto your online account look under Other Services for Request NCB Report...see image below.  Cost is Bt150.   It's mailed to your Thai address.  And nope if wondering if I've asked for one the answer is no.

Capture.JPG.3296de757797cb496b39228aa984214f.JPG

 

Capture2.JPG.ed815d189233b2f330b6eb14479cebc2.JPG

 

Thanks for the link Pib. Unfortunately I don't hold any accounts with Krungsri.

 

I have trawled through the KBank online banking site and can't find any mention of a similar service. I have online accounts with SCB and BBL so will look at those too.

 

I had a report generated several years ago directly from the Credit Bureau and recall that they required quite a bit of documentation from me. I have also given personal guarantees on some corporate loans and have had to sign a form giving them permission to do a credit check.

 

That is why I was surprised it could be done online so easily.

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On 4/21/2017 at 0:15 PM, peter smith said:

 I lost my job then, i ddnt have means to pay back. the only option i had was to return to my country.  life was bit tough then. now i have an opportunity to go back and start everything new. i know this is not an excuse for not owning up your dues.

My sincere apologies if my question made you feel uncomfortable. I was merely trying to understand the scenario and meant no malice at all, Nonetheless, hope all is well now and that you are able to return. Take care. 

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ID: 25   Posted

if the cards were issued in the US, expect a 1099c , cancellation of debt; your taxable income goes up but the debt is cancelled

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ID: 26   Posted

1 hour ago, YetAnother said:

if the cards were issued in the US, expect a 1099c , cancellation of debt; your taxable income goes up but the debt is cancelled

Yes.  Very good point.  I have known people that have walked away from houses that were "under water", had credit card balances discharged, etc. but I have never personally heard of a 1099C being issued, but I am aware of it. Frankly, I don't see how it benefits the creditor, and why the institution would take the time to do it unless it is just a way to formally document the debt forgiveness, or because the IRS regs say to do it, or to make sure the debtor is held liable to some degree for the debt by getting a tax bill.

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ID: 27   Posted

Yeap, Uncle Sam considers it income since you didn't have to pay the debt.  But there a exceptions/fine print when filing your federal taxes relating to the debt.   Below website gives a good explanation.

 

http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/1099-c-tax-form-questions-answers-1282.php

Quote

The IRS requires banks and other creditors who forgive debts of $600 or more to file the forms. Why? Because the IRS says you have to pay taxes on that so-called income, unless you qualify for an exception.  

 

And an IRS weblink regarding 1099C, Cancellation of Debt

https://www.irs.gov/uac/about-form-1099c

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ID: 28   Posted

I Know for a FACT That British Credit Card Companies write OFF The Debt after 2 Years,That's IF It's Not in the Thousands of pounds which I Very much doubt that this one is.....

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BANGKOK 25 July 2017 12:10
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