rooster59

Chiang Mai city transport: Uber or "Rot Daeng"? Thousands of Thais want change

45 posts in this topic

ID: 1   Posted

Chiang Mai city transport: Uber or "Rot Daeng"? Thousands of Thais want change

 

taxi.PNG

Image: Daily News

 

Thousands of Thai people in Chiang Mai have demanded change in the city's transport provision after four people were fined for running illegal Uber and Grab-taxi services.

A campaign has been launched that calls the city's traditional red four wheelers (Rot Daeng) an outdated scourge that should be run off the roads - not the new taxi firms.

Daily News reported that the local land transport department had stopped four members of the public from running Uber and Grab-taxi businesses. The department called the private cars "black plate cabs" and therefore illegal.

And they said they would continue on the crackdown.

But now a website has been set up calling for change - and seven thousand local residents have signed a petition.

The website is at www.change.org.

The website poses the question: "Are 'rot daeng' wanted anymore?"

Then it continues: "They have been around for ages. They cut in and out and are noisy. They provide a bad service and are polluting causing harm to the public health.

"The land transport department have been unable to regulate and improve their service. When Chiang Mai people have a chance for an improved, safer, quicker and healthier transport system they just try to ban it without coming up with anything better."

Daily News said that social media in the northern capital was abuzz with comment as people went to the website to agree with its sentiments.

 

Source: Daily News

 

 
tvn_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2017-03-04
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ID: 3   Posted

4 hours ago, rooster59 said:

Uber and Grab-taxi services

The future.

 

Thailand, stuck in the past.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ID: 5   Posted

9 minutes ago, 1337markus said:

Wasn't the CBD of Chiang Mai promised a light tram system to remove these red vehicles out of the area by the then PM Yinluck on one of her many visits???

Indeed but the military seem to have scuppered that plan a couple of years ago.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ID: 6   Posted

Apart from the pollution problem of the diesel smoke they spew out, I dislike drivers asking for 2 or 3 times the going rate for a local fare.   Often these are empty, and I just wave them off, and they leave with no passengers;  the next wagon or two is usually available at the normal price.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ID: 7   Posted

1 hour ago, edwinchester said:

Indeed but the military seem to have scuppered that plan a couple of years ago.

Yes, with reason.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ID: 8   Posted (edited)

Change to taxis is not a fantastic change, at all.

Some form of public transport controlled by local authorities is a  possible answer.

But please everyone, don't forget many people earn a living driving tuktuks, rotdaeng.

Edited by hansnl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, rooster59 said:


"The land transport department have been unable to regulate and improve their service. When Chiang Mai people have a chance for an improved, safer, quicker and healthier transport system they just try to ban it without coming up with anything better."

Thats it in a nutshell. Add my name to the list. My g/f left for 4 days and told me not to walk her up to the corner because if the red trucks saw me waiting they would double the price to the bus station. Yes I know 90% of transportation funding goes to Bangkok and we get scraps left overs. Cancel one submarine and give us an upgrade. Get your priorities straight for a change and get out of the sandbox with your military toys.  

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 1337markus said:

Wasn't the CBD of Chiang Mai promised a light tram system to remove these red vehicles out of the area by the then PM Yinluck on one of her many visits???

You got to stay up to date. YL plans have changed considerably since then. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, hansnl said:

Yes, with reason.

Submarines, tanks, planes, trains, etc.etc.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Saladin said:

The bandits are the tuk-tuk drivers who expect 100 baht minimum just to say good morning, and so are avoided like the plague by the locals.

Amen. Plus with my poundage and advanced age I find its hard to contortion my way into the back. The pollution is far worse. It has gone beyond a fair price argument and advanced to a health problem when all the traffic is factored in. 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, slapout said:

If you spend any time watching the way the people driving these vehicles, you might realize they might earn a living at it but they also are bigger threat to the living people who are exposed to their erratic way of driving. Many park in the street near the moat to wash their vehicle, take public parking areas to take a nap, charge tourist 5 times the official rate, dump a group on the moat instead of driving down the soi to hotel/guest house, etc. Most seem to have no idea of how to read a map of the old city which is only 1 square mile in size and they can be quite rude when you tell them where you want to go and the decline to take you.

Most are owned by a single company and rented out to drivers.

I guess your last sentence explains it all. I see a lot of shiny new ones out and about it must be a paying business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah! It´s always been my problem too! Should I choose the red or the yellow one? Confused!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had some friends come to stay. They caught a red songteaw which charged them 200 baht a person from the town to Hang Dong and then dumped them near Ob Khan in the middle of nowhere instead of at the Moo Baan where we live. The friends had detailed address and map so there was no need. 4 people x 200 = 800 baht from the City centre to the Ob Khan road near the Canyon.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thaskin Shinawatra was the patron saint of Thai motorcycle taxi drivers  be thankful there are none to be seen in Chaing Mai .

There are bus stops all over the city but the local buses are a rare sight.

A monopoly is never good however and the local community deserve to have a choice of suitable transport. Competition  is good for the customer perhaps that is why there's  none in Chaing Mai.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Light Mono tram makes sense...can just get funded with the ticket sales..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A reliable friend who uses Uber very frequently makes it a habit to find out what he can about the Thais who have picked up on what is fast becoming the service of choice for many journeys around town.  It turned out that he had given up driving a Tuk-Tuk in favour of Uber and although the income per trip was lower, it was more than compensated for by the number of rides and lack of hassle.  There is a place for songthaws on regular routes where their frequency can't be beaten, but if Uber were to replace Tuk-Tuks and the ("Sorry, the meter doesn't work.") meter taxis I'd expert the general population would be over the moon.

 

Uber has given my 15 year old son his first taste of independent travel beyond (safe) cycling range and l hope the vested interests are resisted strongly.  Incidentally, I know that in the West Indies the minivans that are their equivalent of songthaws are almost exclusively owned and rented out by influential local councilors or members of the government.  Of course that's probably not the case here so I'm sure that the whole transport issue will be dealt with very evenhandedly.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, malibukid said:

lets see how long the Chiang Mai Taxi Mafia will put up with the competition that offers point to point service with polite drivers at reasonable rates.  

i was offered a return trip from CM immigration yesterday by the Songthew Mafia for an outrageous price.  i got on my iPhone and arranged the same trip via Uber.  driver arrived in 10 minutes and charged me 80 baht.  

Songthew driver loose face big time and was very angry.  

typical Thai think, can't stand some honest competition.

 

 

 

Probably not a good idea to rub the CMTM's nose in it if you want the service to continue.  Walk round the corner next time :smile:

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, jippytum said:

Thaskin Shinawatra was the patron saint of Thai motorcycle taxi drivers  be thankful there are none to be seen in Chaing Mai .

There are bus stops all over the city but the local buses are a rare sight.

A monopoly is never good however and the local community deserve to have a choice of suitable transport. Competition  is good for the customer perhaps that is why there's  none in Chaing Mai.

saw both at arcade station..moto drivers--a few and new city buses...

i would LOVE to get rid of ALL the tuk tuk drivers in cm...every.last.one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have used UBER on a number of occasions and been very pleased with the service provided.  Whilst I note that the local authority sting involved posing as a legitimate customer for this to work an e-mail and phone number would have to be registered. I am quite certain UBER would have immediately blocked the e-mail and phone number used after the sting had been identified thereby preventing it's reuse.  Unless the local authority are prepared to make numerous fictitious registrations I don't see how this policy is going to work as UBER will continue blocking them when identified.  This is in addition to UBER's "Greyball" tool which is meant to disguise UBER cars from detection by the local authorities as reported in the New York Times.  It's also interesting to note that Bangkok has not banned UBER but merely restricts there vehicles from picking up passengers from the airport. 

 

It is my personal impression UBER are not the kind of company to back down from a fight. As has been reported, and confirmed by local UBER drivers, they are paying fines of the drivers which have been caught. If London, and other major world capitals, have failed to block UBER I don't see what Chiang Mai will be able to achieve.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good point, i asked my Uber driver if he was afraid of the CM Mafia and he just grinned, these guy's are not going anywhere soon

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

BANGKOK 24 April 2017 20:19
Sponsors