BugJackBaron

The thaiglish thread

33 posts in this topic

vice versa, as we can guess from the sound, is not English at all, it's Latin
you don't ignore that Romains stayed sometime in England and there are some Latin expressions in English ( vice versa is also used in French )

I assumed that Thai was using the English vice versa from the way it was used. I have no idea what it means in Latin or French for that matter, but if the same as English then there is no way of determining which language the Thai comes from.


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You only have to look at how it's pronounced in Thai to see from which language vice versa was borrowed from.

 

Most, if not all, mainland Europe languages would pronounce the "i" in vice as อี, English is the only one that pronounces it ไอ

 

On the other hand, if you look at the Thai pronunciation of words using the metric system, like meter, liter, etc. , you can see they are borrowed directly from French:

mètre เมตร

litre ลิตร

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Why use Thai squiggly letters ,few know or care anymore what u mean


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Which would you say is the more important word, know> don't understand Thai, or care> given up trying to understand Thai?


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I just find youngsters trying to be clever annoying. Xkkpafi and Thurien get there without being clever


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I was being clever on the golf course the other day, said ร ริงไต่ลาว and told them that I was from Isaan. Someone passing tried to correct me, คนไทยน่ารักจัง


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We've all done it. My last one.. No time to visit Waterfall in Thai. Asked Wife why that posh Lady in the Car Park laughed at me.?.. You said "No Time to see Droopy Tits". Num V Nam big difference.:post-4641-1156693976:

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Big difference in the tone, water is high tone wheras breasts is mid tone. Thai people tend to like water to be said high and longish. My accent makes water nam and breasts nom.
The spacing in your post had 'big' on its own and I wondered how ตก could be droopy. Once I heard someone say of fruit trees, ตก and when I asked for a translation was told it meant abundant, I never bothered to look it up until juist now. I can't find anything but dropping or falling, but I think that if the tree had abundant fruit some would have fallen and some would be left on the tree, maybe making the branches droop. I wonder if I were to comment ผลไม้ตกมาก it might be interpreted as abundant fruit.


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18 hours ago, tgeezer said:

Once I heard someone say of fruit trees, ตก and when I asked for a translation was told it meant abundant

It is ดก with ด.เด็ก.   

ดก means prolific.  

ผลไม้ลูกดก = abundant fruit (tree)

พ่อลูกดก = a guy with lots of kids

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Ta awfully. I think that this isn't the first time I have made this mistake. If I can get it so wrong using Thai, imagine what misapprehension there must be among people who use transliteration!
This is how language changes naturally I believe.

Just had a look at the RID and see มากกว่าปกติ
ลูกดก of a woman who has had many kids at regular intervals.
So with ไม่มีเวลสไปชมน้ำตก he must have said นมตก falling mamaries, interpreted as droopy mamaries. Is there room for นมดก , of a cow, I wonder.


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On 3/10/2017 at 9:47 AM, Ace of Pop said:

I just find youngsters trying to be clever annoying. Xkkpafi and Thurien get there without being clever


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Thanks for the compliment. Now moving on with the next phase, 'Really' annoying.

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On 3/8/2017 at 10:55 PM, Aforek said:

you don't ignore that Romains stayed sometime in England and there are some Latin expressions in English

the English has not only "some" Latin expressions.

Quote

About 80 percent of the entries in any English dictionary are borrowed, mainly from Latin. Over 60 percent of all English words have Greek or Latin roots. In the vocabulary of the sciences and technology, the figure rises to over 90 percent. About 10 percent of the Latin vocabulary has found its way directly into English without an intermediary (usually French).

 

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ID: 28   Posted (edited)

:sorry:

Edited by Naam

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ID: 29   Posted (edited)

 

sorry

Edited by Naam

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ID: 30   Posted (edited)

sorry, double posting

 

Edited by Naam

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BANGKOK 26 July 2017 02:04
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