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Gardening Safety

59 posts in this topic

Going a bit further from topic: snails are not biting or stinging, but they carry deadly viruses and eat flowers and sprouts of our herbs and passion trees we grow from seeds. We remove them humanely to wild, uncultivated locations, but it seems as a losing battle - more and more of them, now getting to our small lotus pond, munching on leafs. What to do? Thanks!

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23 hours ago, Slain said:

Blimey, sounds like a nature reserve..Keep aligator's in the swimming pool?

Strange you should mention that.....

 

 

IMG20170422135113.jpg

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23 hours ago, Jai Dee said:

Chaindrite_1_M_0029.png

 

I usually get mine from Makro, but most grocery stores have it too.

Tesco Lotus, BigC, etc. all carry it.

Chaindrite_1.pdf

I have attached the MSDS for the product... I would hazard a guess as to say that it is very harmful to pets.

It is very toxic and I am very careful to be upwind of it when spraying so not to breathe any fumes or get it in my eyes.

A thorough wash of the hands after use is also advisable.

The most obvious effect of its toxicity is the number of dead cockroaches you find in the vicinity the following day.

 

You might want to consider that you are going to get more serious health problems from using this stuff so often around your property... than from any ant or scorpion stings! 

 

I did a bit or gardening this morning.. putting up new bamboo fence... in just over an hour I had already met with a tree snake jumping at my face, 2 scorpions, several spiders, angry hornets, huge black ants enjoying stinging my arms, and an inquisitive buffalo.

 

I think I am hardened up to most of the average creepy creatures.  Lost count of the number of times I have been stung by scorpions, wasps, hornets etc.  See lots of snakes too... even 4 banded Kraits this year... and countless (harmless) sunbeam snakes. I was even bitten by a snake a while back (but he was my pet ball python who mistook my hand for his rat dinner). 

 

I did have a thriving bee nest like the above posters photo.. until one of the villagers climbed over our wall and stole it for the honey. 

 

 

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On 4/21/2017 at 4:44 PM, djayz said:

Me too... I work like a madman all day in the scorching sun and come 4:30-5pm it's time to pack the tools away, wash up and crack open a big, ice cold Beer Chang and just wallow in the fact that I did something useful that day. 

In the space of a year/year and a half I turned our neglected house and garden into a place that now looks like human beings actually live there.

Still a lot more to do, but finally I'm happy with what I've achived so far. 

Only 18 months to get the yard cleaned up ey?  Well get to work on the other half and we'll see you in 2019.

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-22 at 5.12.37 PM.png

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On 21/04/2017 at 3:42 PM, sandrabbit said:

In our garden in Rayong we mostly get oriental rat snakes & red necked keelbacks, the rat snakes always make a fast getaway but the keelbacks don't seem to care about people. We always know when there's a snake in the garden as the mynah birds (Thais call them buffalo birds) make a hell of a racket and follow the snakes around the garden, I was surprised how close they follow the snakes on the ground and sometimes even the sparrows get in on the act.

 

Those red ants are evil and seem to regard the mango trees as their property but for something small the bite don't half hurt!.

Best way to get rid of ants I have found is with borax  mixed with sugar into a paste and place it near the nest/trees.

I don't use any chemical  sprays.

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Rubber boots are a bit of overkill in most of my garden. Use Crocs but socks are a must because of Ants. Only the small red fire ants are a problem, when i locate a nest it is time for the boiling water. I keep that up along with a bit of excavation with a hoe for a day or two until all dead or they relocate. Otherwise trousers if not to hot. Cannot really get along with gloves, i need that 'hands on' feel' and take it slow, then you don't get bitten.

 

Finally, snails. Never heard of viruses but can get other parasites from them. I just crush them up and feed to my ducks or fish, In the lotus pond if they are golden apple snails (big ones) you need to hand collect them. If smaller ones get some carp - they love snails.

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ID: 55   Posted

4 hours ago, drtreelove said:

Nobody is going to get serious health problems from using  Chaindrite Crack and Crevice according to label instructions. 

The 2 active ingredients are pyrethroids, and are minimal toxicity for mammals. Just don't get overspray in your Koi pond, it's toxic to fish, and don't spray plants in flower or bees could gain contact while foraging. 

It's always better to find organic program compatible, integrated pest management solutions.  But pyrethroids used for spot spraying are very effective and the least of your worries for toxicity to people and pets. Don't spray the entire property. Follow the ant trail back to where they come out of the ground or crack or crevice. Spot spray there. 

IPM first line of defense is sanitation, clean up food sources for ants and cockroaches so they aren't attracted to your kitchen or dining room in the first place. 

BIO-RATIONAL PEST CONTROL.pdf

You believe what they say on the label?

 

Would you spray it on your cheese sandwich and eat it?  Read these before you do....

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1519860/

 

Overview of human health and chemical mixtures: problems facing developing countries.

 

 

 

 

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ID: 56   Posted

On 21/04/2017 at 6:42 PM, jko said:

My recipe for all insect bites is to very quickly apply a pad soaked in standard 70% alcohol (surgical spirit) , and keep it held there for five minutes or even longer, rubbing gently. This seems to change the chemical structure of the venom (?) and the sting is considerably lessened, or often goes away completely. I have tried this with the small (almost transparent) scorpions, big black soldier ants, and most recently with a bee sting. All worked nicely! If you delay the alcohol treatment, the result is not as effective. The alcohol will also act as an antiseptic, so good to do anyway. Comments on this technique will be welcome.

My comment: working in some places I will be bitten about every minute unless I apply Chaindrite. I have a tube of Systral cream in my pocket. I don't care about chemical structures I just want to get rid of the sting.

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ID: 57   Posted

I was relieving myself by a lime tree and got stung on the old fella by a wasp.
 
I rushed indoors and asked the wife to get me some antihistamine cream. She returned with a paracetamol and said it should take away the pain but leave the swelling.
 
Boom, boom.
 
:sorry:

Is it throbbing?


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app

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ID: 58   Posted

Re: Snakes

 

Years ago I had climbed out on a series of rocky outcroppings to fish in a local river near some rapids.(back in the USA). After an hour or so of fishing I made my way back to shore but suddenly saw an Eastern Rattlesnake (commonly called a Water Moccasin) blocking my path...and he did not want to move as he used his rattle to warn me not to get closer. I tried using my fishing pole to get him into the water but he stood his ground and struck at it. I had to wait about 30 minutes before he decided to slither off into the river and let me go.

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ID: 59   Posted

18 hours ago, jak2002003 said:

You believe what they say on the label?

 

Would you spray it on your cheese sandwich and eat it?  Read these before you do....

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1519860/

 

Overview of human health and chemical mixtures: problems facing developing countries.

 

 

 

 

Valid point. I fully support reducing hard chemistry pesticide use.  

Pesticide labels, for synthetic chemistry products or OMRI organic program  compatible, are not just about ingredients, but have important instructions on safe and effective use. And that's my point in a discussion on gardening safety. Nobody here, except Jak, is talking about spraying a cheese sandwich.  

You can find negative information on just about everything in our environment and food chain.  

 
"Changes that occur in cheese with the fermenting and “ripening” process include the production of a toxic alkaloid called roquefortine, a neurotoxin which can cause mice to have convulsive seizures."

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BANGKOK 25 July 2017 17:47
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