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Pilot forced to drop animal due to windy weather: Ministry

47 posts in this topic

Wind shear was not the issue here. The pilot, who I can only imagine had very limited experience slinging, used a lanyard that was far to short and exceeded the aircrafts speed limitations (VNE) while carrying an underslung load. 
 
 


What was the length of the lanyard he used? What should it have been?

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18 minutes ago, SABloke said:

 


What was the length of the lanyard he used? What should it have been?

 

At the moment they are still doing studies into that all over with various countries armed forces. The problem has so many variables they might take a long time to come up with a 100% formula to address the problem. It happens more often than people are aware of.

This one is getting a lot of attention because it's a bear. If it had been 10 sacks of rice it would be a different story or a non story.

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6 hours ago, Bluespunk said:

Inept, incompetent officials who couldn't plan their way out of a wet paper bag are the cause. 

With scissors in their hands

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At the moment they are still doing studies into that all over with various countries armed forces. The problem has so many variables they might take a long time to come up with a 100% formula to address the problem. It happens more often than people are aware of.
This one is getting a lot of attention because it's a bear. If it had been 10 sacks of rice it would be a different story or a non story.


I understand this. My comment was a sarcastic one, because Wingman categorically stated that the lanyard was too short: to make such a statement one should have the 'facts'. He clearly doesn't in this case and is just making assumptions wrapped in the guise of an "expert opinion" ;)
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19 minutes ago, elgordo38 said:

Market has better odds all the stocks keep going up. Asia follows the Dow Europe follows Asia its an upward spiral. Investors are winners. Companies fudge their quarterly profits with the governments blessing, they borrow our savings at next to nothing, Large corporations have large algorithym programs that make them winners 99.9% of the time all with the governments blessing how can we loose.!!!!

The bear was the loser in this one.

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7 minutes ago, SABloke said:

 


I understand this. My comment was a sarcastic one, because Wingman categorically stated that the lanyard was too short: to make such a statement one should have the 'facts'. He clearly doesn't in this case and is just making assumptions wrapped in the guise of an "expert opinion" ;)

 

 

😆

Never really liked choppers, anything that has wings travelling faster than the main frame always sounded dodgy to me.

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9 minutes ago, overherebc said:

The bear was the loser in this one.

Sometimes in death we can become winners. 

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overherebc  nailed it.

 

Think of the rotors as the main stable part with the chopper body swinging about underneath. This does not normally matter as this is how choppers fly and the pilot can make small flight adjustments to keep movement to a minimum.

 

As soon as a load is slung under the chopper the normal slight movements of regular flight are magnified and need extra attention. Add an external force on the slung load, like a gust of wind and this is magnified though the chopper body up to the rotors, makes for tricky flying.

 

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, overherebc said:

Armed forces all the world over are still doing studies into the instabilities introduced due to slung loads, some still ongoing into the reasons for Australian British and American helicopter pilots having to drop loads instead of crashing.

But don't let facts get in the way of Thai bashing from your early morning bar stools.

The above are u/s loads for the most part with quite large weights. An 80kg sedated bear is hardly a drama.

 

'Thai bashing'- I would have questioned this pilot's ability if he were a Martian! I certainly would not want to fly with him.

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19 minutes ago, Psimbo said:

The above are u/s loads for the most part with quite large weights. An 80kg sedated bear is hardly a drama.

 

'Thai bashing'- I would have questioned this pilot's ability if he were a Martian! I certainly would not want to fly with him.

I don't know the pilot, you don't know the pilot but you are very quick to blame the guy for making a decision that most likely saved the lives of maybe 3 'people' on that chopper. Do you get to know every pilot before you climb onto a plane to go on holiday?

An average chopper pilot has more co-ordination skills, between eyes brain hands and feet than a plane pilot. In fact you need to qualify fixed wing before you can try rotary. It's a whole different ball game.

I am a great believer in the expression, 'never assume because the ass is u before me'

😆 Have a nice weekend.

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14 hours ago, overherebc said:

On the point of wind shear, the reason in can catch out even experienced pilots is that it doesn't have a big sign pointing to it, it's invisible, it's wind. When a plane enters an invisible upward, downward or sideways moving piece of air as well as it's forward speed it moves upward, downward or sideways at the exact same speed as that piece of air. That's why in a plane that hits turbulence if you're not strapped in and the plane drops suddenly you stay where you are. In real terms the luggage locker comes down and belts you, you don't go up and hit it.

You can be made aware of it pre-flight but you have no control over when you are going to encounter it.

Comments about wind shear particularly true over uneven terrain.  It simply cannot be accurately and reliably forecast, esp. in remote/wilderness areas to which I presume this bear was being transported.  It's possible that preflight planning was inadequate, but you certainly can't adjudicate that from the article.  But why spoil wannabes' fun, right?

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15 hours ago, overherebc said:

Does that mean that all the planes that crashed on landing due to wind shear at airports all over the world were piloted by xxxxxx, you fill in the blanks.

😆

According to wikipedia, the statistics of crashes due to wind shear in commercial flights is 1 every 10 years in the US. Divide that by the number of flights landing in 10 years and you realize that it is not a scary number. The pilots are often under pressure to complete the flight, or their company has a couple of hundred angry passengers to calm down and rebook and compensate.

 

The helicopter pilot was simply delivering a bear. He had many options beside dropping the animal.

 

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It makes perfect sense to describe this 'lesson' as wind shear when this exercise was really imperfectly rigged and planned. 

 

Random is acceptable in Thai professional outcomes.

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Off topic trolling posts about the stock market performance have been removed. 

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15 hours ago, SABloke said:

 


I understand this. My comment was a sarcastic one, because Wingman categorically stated that the lanyard was too short: to make such a statement one should have the 'facts'. He clearly doesn't in this case and is just making assumptions wrapped in the guise of an "expert opinion" ;)

 

SABloke

 

28 years as a helicopter pilot and still flying...............makes me somewhat of an expert.  

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SABloke
 
28 years as a helicopter pilot and still flying...............makes me somewhat of an expert.  


I know you're a pilot and normally read your posts with interest. Normally you are more factua though (real numbers/stats etc) ;)

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Facts, real number and statistics...................do your own research SABloke (Einstein)!


YOU said his lanyard was too short. For something to be categorically too short it needs a value applied. I asked you what length his lanyard was and what it should have been since you were so adamant in you post. Still waiting for the response...:)

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Perfect length would in theory keep the load vitually attached to to the floor, between the skids, unfortunately it would mean landing on the bear and that would have the same result as dropping it.

😆

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SABloke................to make such a statement one should have the 'facts'. He clearly doesn't in this case and is just making assumptions wrapped in the guise of an "expert opinion".

 

I have information regarding this scenario and I will not be baited by a sarcastic comment. 

 

My original comment stands.

 

 

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BANGKOK 26 April 2017 10:56
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