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Video: weaving truck case prompts highway chief to consult with land department about dash-cams

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Video: weaving truck case prompts highway chief to consult with land department about dash-cams

 

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Picture: Daily News

 

BANGKOK: -- A dash-cam video that caught a Chiang Mai truck weaving recklessly across a road has prompted the chief of highway police to discuss the admissibility of such footage for prosecution.

 

It is hoped that damning dash-cam evidence may help to change poor driving habits on Thai roads, reported Daily News.

 

The footage was actually taken by a leading Region 5 policeman in his private car but as he was not on duty in a police vehicle the admissibility of the evidence is unsure.

 

Highways chief Somchai Kaosamran said that dash-cam footage was a relatively new phenomenon in Thailand and the law has to catch up with its increasing prevalence.

 

He said there would not be much point in having it if it could not be used to nail negligent drivers.

 

The footage of the Chiang Mai truck shocked many people - not least those in the car doing the filming.

 

Many want to see such footage used for prosecutions that go beyond the provisions of the highway code.

 

Source: Daily News

 
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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2017-04-21
 

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1 hour ago, dutchweller said:

How is it that Dash cam footage admissibility is unsure

Bbut CCTV footage is ok? what is the difference??

 

I can only speak to what I know.

 

Where I come from, you can have your own CCTV set up attached to your own property for your own safety and peace of mind.

 

However, if your CCTV overlooks any other property, eg a main road or next door's garden, any CCTV evidence will be void.

 

This means that if someone steals a car in front of your property but not from your property, even though you can see exactly who did it, the police would need other evidence to trap the thief because your CCTV footage would be inadmissible.

 

I believe that is the state of UK law but of course if you are able to update that I would be happy to read the latest position.

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I have had a dash cam now for a few yrs and my main reason was so that if some idiot in front of me did something to cause me to have an accident I would at least have a case to present to my insurance Co.I have not had cause to use it thus so far ,but maybe they too would baulk at the idea of using this as evidence.Has anyone had any experience with this problem?.Let's face it,it's all relative to this thread.

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My impression was that the articulated lorry was travelling a little too fast for safety , it is a pity the Dashcam kph was not working .  The only severe wobble I noticed was almost certainly due to the trailer fishtailing as a result of retaking the nearside lane too fast after overtaking a car .

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In the UK, the policeman would be the witness giving evidence about the speed, manner of driving. The dash cam footage is simply corroboration (support) of what the witness says. In fact, UK courts accept a police officer's opinion as an expert witness about estimated speed even without corroboration, in the absence of any evidence to the contrary. This is one of the few cases where evidence of opinion is admissible there.  

 

Most UK traffic patrol cars, marked and unmarked, have video recording, onboard radar, and certified speedometers which have to be checked regularly over a measured mile to make sure they have the evidence to present against offenders. Maybe one day it will happen in Thailand. 

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<deleted> of course it is admissible, let the truck driver challenge its authenticity in court and see how that goes, it is no different than using cctv or phone camera footage of other types of crime

 

it is only a video not some technical equipment that might need certified and calibrated in order to use as evidence such as a breathalyser or speed detection device

 

 

I'm going to use the "stupidity" word again

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19 minutes ago, biplanebluey said:

I have had a dash cam now for a few yrs and my main reason was so that if some idiot in front of me did something to cause me to have an accident I would at least have a case to present to my insurance Co.I have not had cause to use it thus so far ,but maybe they too would baulk at the idea of using this as evidence.Has anyone had any experience with this problem?.Let's face it,it's all relative to this thread.

I have cameras for this reason front and rear of my car, and already used it twice to show police and insurance the actions of the idiot motorcyclists who drove into me. No one worried about any rules of evidence or inadmissibility, but it didn't come to a court case.

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My impression was that the articulated lorry was travelling a little too fast for safety , it is a pity the Dashcam kph was not working .  The only severe wobble I noticed was almost certainly due to the trailer fishtailing as a result of retaking the nearside lane too fast after overtaking a car .

Drivers can do that Fishtail easy, not good,it's their way of Flipin the Bird to inconsiderate lane joggers like the Cop with the Cam.


Sent from my iPhone using Thailand Forum - Thaivisa mobile app
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Normal day on the roads,nothing to indicate "weaving".

In the interests of road safety education,the authorities should look at whatever education or training is used to make Thais park with their front wheels "straight".

Perhaps this could also be used to have more relevant issues addressed and adhered to.

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There are good reasons to be very wary of video evidence in court. Anyone who understands the basics of imagery in either photos or film will know full well that seeing is not believing.

As another poster points out whilst filming the “incident” the video also records a fault in the video-makers driving.
Furthermore video only records what it is pointed at.  Although unlikely it is possible that the factor causing the truck to weave was out of shot. In other videos this is often the case - they simply don’t record everything and a construct a false reality - sadly this is usually overlooked.
Film is a far more manipulative and manipulatable media than most people would give credit .
 

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Hold on, how can a police man see a crime and not do anything about it?
I thought policemen were never completely off duty.

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1 hour ago, trainman34014 said:

If they got just a small percentage of their 310,000 lazy ass Cops out on the roads in unmarked cars they would soon be raking in enough money to install all the equipment needed to bring an end to much of the bad driving we see on a daily basis.

 

This particular recording is pussy compared to many of the Trucks i have followed even in the last few months !

You got that right  310,000 lazy cops who dont even know the rules themselves. This guy talking must of had nothing to do So hang on i will grab a mic and talk Nothing will happen Its just talk talk I have seen cops drive through red lights and when they do the rest of the traffic just follows

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BANGKOK 26 April 2017 10:56
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